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Hello everyone,

I picked up my brand new 2013 Elantra a few weeks ago (still have under 300km on it : ) ) and loving the car. I am in Ottawa so need to prepare for the winter and wondering what absolutely must do maintenance/prep work I need to do.

I AM putting on new winter tires.

Dealer says I don't need to change oil, washer fluid etc.

I've read about waxing new cars, but I am a complete newbie to both owning a car as well as owning a car in the winter...so appreciate if anyone has some advice on this.

Also, washing the car in the winter, some say do it, other say don't. I am a bit confused.

Any good websites, books folks recommend for new car ownership and some of these basic questions to be answered? I am slowly working myway through the owner manual.

thanks in advance,
 

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I'd wash the car in the winter. I'm not sure about Ottawa, but in the gta, they use salt on the roads. Always good to clean off that salt. Always make sure you have an extra bottle of windshield washer fluid in the car. good to have in case you run out, while driving. just remember to buy another bottle, if you use the one in your trunk. I use way more fluid in the winter months. Other than that, just regular maintenance when needed.

Not a maintenance tip. If you have heated seats, use them. They'll warm you up faster than the heat from the vents.
 

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I wash Ingrid by hand, even in winter months. As long as the temp on a weekend day doesn't drop below 45F, I'm in the driveway washing/rinsing. Only difference? I get warm water from the kitchen sink for my soap suds. Keeps my hands warmer.

Get yourself a good Carnuba-based wax and spend some time polishing her up in preparation for the winter onslaught.

If you want to go "all out," buy a good quality sealer and put that on first and buff it off before you wax/buff. Just follow the manufacturer's directions. That should get you by until Springtime pops around the corner. Which is, IMO, not soon enough!
 

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You might want to apply some silicone (spray onto a rag to apply) on the door's rubber weatherstrip seals to keep them from freezing and the doors freezing shut.

Otherwise, good advice above, and I'm glad I'm not the only one hand washing in winter (and I use warm water too).
 

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You might want to apply some silicone (spray onto a rag to apply) on the door's rubber weatherstrip seals to keep them from freezing and the doors freezing shut.

Otherwise, good advice above, and I'm glad I'm not the only one hand washing in winter (and I use warm water too).
Good for you, Randy, on those door seals. MY preference (although there are probably many) is the Liquid Wrench brand of silicone in the spray can. I see it, pretty much, in most auto parts stores, hardware and retail auto departments.

Hadn't thought about the seals freezing to the doors due to cold extremes and moisture, or rain/snow accumulations in the edges. Great pre-emptive measure to avoid that from happening. Maybe that's why I've never encountered that issue so the stuff must be working...I use it religiously. :thumbsup:
 

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Ive found this to be a fast, easy and safe way to remove that white stuff if needed. Here in NY it only seems to be available at Auto Barn.
SnoBrum
 

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Ive found this to be a fast, easy and safe way to remove that white stuff if needed. Here in NY it only seems to be available at Auto Barn.
SnoBrum
John, I saw some on the shelves in the auto department alongside other auto items (fuel additives, motor additives, carb cleaners, etc.) in our local Wally*World. And it works well to hide minor blemishes/scratches you might have on your door sill plates from your shoes scraping across them. As well as those door panels if you accidentally put a mark on one of them.

Bought my most recent two cans at Home Depot (gave my son the other one-I'm a GREAT dad, LOL).

Liquid Wrench also offers several other products in a similarly-sized can. I believe white lithium grease was one such offering. I'll have to check that again because I'm needing some for a few home/auto projects.
 

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:laughing: That's hilarious. "Dealer added option?" They have to pay their enormous overhead, somehow.

There was a Cadillac/Oldsmobile dealer in our area in the early areas that used to "partake" in a little nose candy. Whenever one of his salesmen would hit a home run on a car deal, he'd get invited upstairs to the office to "collect his bonus." Local authorities finally got wind of it and swarmed the place. Made for some great headlines and jokes in the area. "The higher the profit margin, the higher you get!" "The more you make, the more you take." Stuff like that! LMAO
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone. Lots of good sugestions. Lots to learn...exciting time.

Washing is not an option for me as I live in an apartment and have no access to hoses etc. Looking at some waterless product or will just take it to a car wash just 5 mins away.

Would you recommend a tire air pump of some sorts or just an air pressure gauge only?

Any particular products for the interior (its a GL so all plastic).
 

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I have an air pump that you plug into the power port in the car that I use alot, as we have 4 cars, and a high quality air guage (not the pencil type) that I use with it. Coincidentally, I used them twice this week, including today.



 

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Maintaining proper air pressure year round is important, and the pump is not just for fixing flats. (Note: I bought a real spare and kit for our E.)

When the ambient air temps change dramatically as the have here in the last few weeks (its going to be 28 in two nights after 70s in last few days), and adjustment is easy at home with the plug-in pump.
 

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Canada gets a proper spare tire


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
To quote Alohajoe: "How lucky they are!" Couldn't agree more! Haven't needed one yet, however. Knock on wood: :wallbash:

Maintaining proper air pressure year round is important, and the pump is not just for fixing flats. (Note: I bought a real spare and kit for our E.)

When the ambient air temps change dramatically as the have here in the last few weeks (its going to be 28 in two nights after 70s in last few days), and adjustment is easy at home with the plug-in pump.
Couldn't agree more with your recommendation to purchase a quality air gauge. The pencil type just doesn't do it for me. Too inconsistent.

I've entertained the thought of getting "another" air pump like Randy's illustration, above, shows. I just don't want to mess up the "new" by using my OEM pump that came with the car. I'd prefer to keep my original, "all original." (I know, it's a personal quirk.)

Remember guys and gals: For every drop in temperature of 10 degrees, your tires lose 1 pound of air pressure. And always check your pressures when the tires are "cold." Heat build-up during driving will raise the tire pressure and give you a false reading (think NASCAR). If tire monitoring was ever critical (and it always is, IMO) then winter time would be the most demanding of the 4 seasons. Or, for our Canadian and northern cousins only having 2 seasons: Winter and Spring. :wink2:

Our 7-11 convenience stores in Oklahoma have free air stations. Closest one to us is about a mile away. Makes it nice if someone needs a quick top-off.
 
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