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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2013 elantra wit approx 67000 mi
dealer quoted $790 to replace the front disk brakes & rotors which I feel is much too high.....
I have replaced many disk pads in the past but @ 73+ yrs I am a little hesitant to do it myself especially removing the screws that attach the rotors to the hub.
What is your experience in using aftermarket brake parts and what are the best brands....
I have no complaints about hyundai's brake performance as it is probably one of the better features of the elantra...just that the OEM parts are expensive...thanks for your help....
 

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I bought rotors and pads from Advanced auto, got the premium stuff (full ceramic) and it is doing well. It seems to be putting out less dust than the OEM stuff. I think any premium version at any auto store would be a good bet.

The screw that holds the rotor onto the hub is there for assembly purposes. It serves almost no purpose once the wheels are on since the wheel holds the rotors onto the hub. The screw will most likely sheer off once you try to take it off. I had an impact driver loosen it and I was only able to get one out of the four off.

My rotors were stuck on due to salt and tight tolerances. I got some large bolts and nuts, put it through the brake caliper mounting "ears" and then pop the rotor off from the back (not my idea but read it somewhere on this forum under stuck rotors). If you have the nuts/bolts, it'll take you two minutes to take off the rotor, assuming you get all the other bolts off. I had to do this since it was stuck on pretty good.
 

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That's crazy high for pricing. Kia/Hyundai dealers that I've been to have always been relatively fair with repair/parts costs when compared to other makes.

You can't go wrong with Bendix, Raybestos, Wagner, Akebono, ... and most of the premium auto store products. Skip the entry level cheap stuff.
 

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My dealer quoted me ~ $760 for all four corners, rotors and pads. I bought the parts from RockAuto and paid $135 delivered. Raybestos RPT rotors and Wagner ThermoQuiet ceramic pads. Did it myself. It can't be much more than 2 hrs of labor at the dealer to do all four. DOing it myself in the driveway took longer than a professional, maybe 4-5 hrs total. Even paying the pro's $150/hr. that's ~$450 for all 4 corners not 2. anything above that is pure profit. There is nothing special about Hyundai brakes. (my Hyundai OEM pads delaminated from their backing plate!) Check with your local independent mechanic. It should be a lot less than dealer.

P.S. I'm 65 and I know what you mean. I had to drill out 7 of those 8 screws holding the rotors to the hubs. Those screws are very soft steel. I didn't use them during the reinstall.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for all the replies..........RXElantra, what did you use in trying to get those screws out?....they are really the most concern I have in doing the brake job.....
 

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Easiest way to take care of those screws is a drill and a 1/4" bit. Just drill till the head pops off and forget about them. Takes all of 5 seconds per rotor.
 

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[email protected], that screw is really soft and easy to drill. (full disclosure: my car is a Korean build. Screws may be harder if built in the US?) I 1st tried breaking them free with an air impact That just managed to round out the recess of the screws. That's good because it now gave a fair amount of centering for the subsequent drilling process. I used a bigger drill than 1/4". Maybe 3/8"? Slightly smaller than the head dia of the flat head screw. I wanted to drill out the head of the screw, down to the hub. The screw is 6mm. 1/4" drill is just too close for a guarantee that the head will be drilled completely off. I made sure that the remainder of the screw was flush, or below the surface of the hub so not to interfere with the installation of the new rotor. I hope that helps.
 

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I buy my brake parts at Rock Auto. It's just easier for me to sit here and pick the parts I want than go to the local store and get what they got. Does it make any difference? Probably not. I've had good luck with ceramic pads.

This tool has worked for me for 30+ years. Sears.com Twist clockwise until it loads up, hit it with a hammer. Do that a couple of times and the screw will be loose. Make sure you use the proper bit. It must fit tightly in the screw head. Too small and you will damage the bit and you'll be using the drilling advice above. Works every time. Put NeverFreeze on them and the next time you won't need the tool.

The screws are needed. They hold the rotor tight so you can replace the brake pads. If the rotor is flopping around, it will make it harder to get the caliper with new pads back on.

I file the ears on the new pads so they move freely in the clips. Not doing this results in the pads getting jammed in the clip and not releasing so they wear out along with the rotor. I just did the fronts on our Sonata and noticed one of the rears was dragging. You could see the bluing on the rotor and it dragged when spun. So I cleaned up the pads and all was well. This is a common problem with this design used by many manufacturers. First, the ears on the pads are always rough. Even if you clean them up and add lube, rust builds up between the clip and bracket which pinches the pads. I have been putting grease between the clip and bracket but with the salt and brine used around here it really is an ongoing maintenance issue.

I'm only 64 but I broke my foot last summer so I'm just getting back into working on the cars. The swapping snow tires and replacing the front sway bar links on the Elantra went pretty good the other night. Doing the links all around, front brakes, oil change and swapping snow tires on the Sonata a couple of weeks ago was another story. It's fun right?
 

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The "easiest" way to remove the screw is an impact screwdriver. You hit it so it keeps pressure on the screw while it turns it.

The screw is not needed.. nothing flops around if you know how to do a brake job.

As for the brand of pads.. you can go with anything. As for Rock Auto, they have cheap parts but I don't necessarily think they have the best quality parts.

Over $700 for front brakes is theft. My dealer wanted around $350 on my Elantra.. even that's too high.
 

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if you have to drill them all out just use a lug nut and some sort of spacer to hold the rotor down. it gets kinda tricky to start a bracket bolt with the rotor floppin around.
 

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Mine just came out with a screwdriver big enough to fill the head (#2 or #3), a little power by Armstrong, and a <TINK> as they broke loose and came right out. And I live in New England! I coated them with Anti-seize and reinstalled them. Makes holding the rotors in place so you can install a loaded caliper a snap!
 

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In case you're wondering what power by Armstrong is...

 
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I respect you hanging in their at 73 years old. I'm no spring chicken, and at 48 I'm finding it easier to pay for a lot of the work I use to do without even considering all issues with doing such things (multiple trips for parts, tool and things I forgot) not to mention how my back will feel the next day ...lol

My best advise would be to use never seize compound on any bolt you can that will need to be removed at the next service. I am replacing my brakes and rotors on my 03 Celica and thank myself for using the stuff on those bolts as well as the center where the rotor meats the hub. My rusty rotors slipped right off....

Over $700 sounds crazy to me. Even for all 4 corners. As a reference, I did my Celica, with Ceramic pads and upgrades rotors for somewhere around $150. Certainly an Elantra can be done for the same or less. I watched many YouTube videos on this car before buying mine. Brakes are very easy, well at least t it seems so...
 

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Regarding the screws holding the rotors on: I too was worried about getting them out as I had this issue many years ago on a Honda. I tried a technique learned on line: I soaked them in penetrating oil for 20 minutes then took a steel bar and hammer and beat the heck out of the rotor near each screw to cause a shock to loosen it up. The screws came out quite easily after that.
 

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Changed the front only with

EBC Ultimax Slotted Rotors
Front Rotor Set
2016 Hyundai Elantra
(Sedan)
Part #: USR7629

EBC Red Stuff Brake Pads
Front Pads - Full Set
2016 Hyundai Elantra
(Sedan)
Part #: DP31874C

It stops like a different car.
Dust is a problem.
2k miles on them , dust is a bit less.

Sloted disks changed my stoping in rain after I hit a puddle , with the stock brakes I needed a 1,2 pump after a puddle to be a able to stop.
With these no problem.
They are pricey but you CAN'T cheap out on brakes and tires it migh be the difference between life and death.
When you hit the brakes hard for a long stop they do make a low grouling noice but they stop my god they stop!
 

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I have a 2012 Elantra sedan with 72000 miles on it. As the miles piled up, I noticed there was more "play" in my brake pedal than years earlier. I inspected my front rotors & pads. The rotors had the usual rust around the circumference, but otherwise looked fine. The pads were worn evenly but still had plenty of material left, just not as much as the new pads had. I wanted less play in braking and thought a new set of pads would do the trick. I ordered through Amazon. I did nothing to the rotors, they hardly looked used. On the right front I removed the caliper assembly completely. This required removal of 2 large machine bolts, 17mm hex heads that were very hard to loosen even with PB Blaster & hammering, but they came off after several rest breaks for my arms. I used a 25" 1/2" drive wrench I got from Harbor Freight and had to hammer the end of it to loosen the bolts.
Then on the other side I discovered that I could have removed the old disk pads without removing those 2 pesky machine bolts holding the calipers on. When the front wheel is off the rotor, I found I could just lever the old pads out of their brackets with a screw driver as a pry bar.

On both wheels I used a 4" C-clamp and a small flat steel plate to make the disk piston back off to give me enough space to drop and then clip the new, thicker pads in.

Not messing with the rotors saved a huge amount of time & effort, along with not removing the entire caliper assembly with its 2 rusty machine bolts.
After this was done, my brake pedal action is like new, very crisp and smooth.

I am 71 and was pushing my personal limit on loosening those 17mm hex head bolts. Other than that the procedure was easy.
I know most disk brake repairs include working on or replacing the rotors, but this seemed entirely unnecessary based on my inspection & my experience after the job. I have put over 100,000 miles on many different vehicles in my life time, their rear brakes never really needed replacement, only the front brake pads or disk pads.
 

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The "easiest" way to remove the screw is an impact screwdriver. You hit it so it keeps pressure on the screw while it turns it.

The screw is not needed.. nothing flops around if you know how to do a brake job.
I have no impact screwdriver. If you are going to get rid of the rotor anyway, why not use the metal cutting edge on an angle grinder to cut a slot in the retention screw head? This would also cut a bit into the old, doomed rotor. I like seeing the sparks. A regular straight slotted screwdriver should be able to then get a very good grip on the retention screw.
 

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I have no impact screwdriver. If you are going to get rid of the rotor anyway, why not use the metal cutting edge on an angle grinder to cut a slot in the retention screw head? This would also cut a bit into the old, doomed rotor. I like seeing the sparks. A regular straight slotted screwdriver should be able to then get a very good grip on the retention screw.
When I did mine, I used a technique that I read somewhere on line, perhaps here: I soaked the countersunk screws in penetrating oil, let them sit for 20 minutes or so, then took a chisel or thick steel rod and hit the bejesus out of the rod with one end on the rotor near the screw, hitting with a big hammer. The idea is to shock the heck out of the joint to knock the individual pieces into being individual once more. It worked great!!! They came out with modest effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
finally got around to replacing the front disk brakes @ approx 71,000mi....it is probably the easiest and most satisfying job one can do on their car....although, it took me much longer to do than I expected....the screws that attach the rotor came out real easy using the impact tool mentioned in the posts....I finally went with OEM hyundai parts as I could not be certain of the exact fit of aftermarket parts and their longevity....even if they lasted 30,000mi, one would have to replace them again to get to the 70,000mi range so the total price difference would be minimal.....
giving credit where credit is due, the hyundai brakes have been excellent and that is another reason I went with them...
the only regret is I got coated rotors which are more expensive then regular one because I could not find out which was which, upfront...

2 rotors....148.76
dis pad kit....61.20
motrin...$10.00....LOL.....alot of aches and pains after that one @ 74yrs...

got the parts from the link below

http://www.hyundaipartsdeal.com/
 
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