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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys, i'm on my 3rd set of rotors and pads in 6 months. At 65k i bought a small trailer and se it periodically. Had about 800lbs on it and warped the rotors. I replaced with EBC slotted fronts and green pads which dusted like crazy. Swapped out for ceramic pads and nothing has worked well since.'ve tried the same rotors with Truxp pads front and rear. Rear rotors are AZ duralast premium.
My issue....noise and warpage. I have squealing at speed, and when almost stopped applying brakes, they make a groaning sound...that coincides with the speed of the wheel. It's driving me nuts. I've been doing brakes for 20+ years and have never run into anything like this on a car before.
Sorry for the long question. Also, car now has 128k on it, and i did replace the whole suspension at 115k.
What and where should i start?
 

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Ok guys, i'm on my 3rd set of rotors and pads in 6 months. At 65k i bought a small trailer and se it periodically. Had about 800lbs on it and warped the rotors. I replaced with EBC slotted fronts and green pads which dusted like crazy. Swapped out for ceramic pads and nothing has worked well since.'ve tried the same rotors with Truxp pads front and rear. Rear rotors are AZ duralast premium.
My issue....noise and warpage. I have squealing at speed, and when almost stopped applying brakes, they make a groaning sound...that coincides with the speed of the wheel. It's driving me nuts. I've been doing brakes for 20+ years and have never run into anything like this on a car before.
Sorry for the long question. Also, car now has 128k on it, and i did replace the whole suspension at 115k.
What and where should i start?


It sure does sound like your typical caliper problems to me. Based on my long experience with Hondas and others I find that at around 100,000 the first inkling oof brake issues I start switching out the offending calipers. I have not had any issues with my sonata 65,000 but my daughters Elantra was squeaking and pulling at 35k Dragging brakes making noises etc. I stopped it by taking the **** thing off and just ggiving it a good cleaning like Hyundai seems obsessed with when you take it in. And 40 some years of driving and fixing cars I never had to clean brakes on anything so it might be a Hyundai thing but it’s easy enough to do just take it loose get in there and clean it up.

The thing is that with that many miles you might have corrosion hindering the free sliding action of that piston causing your brakes to drag. You can’t easily see the crud rim either without pulling up the dust boot . Given where you are in your problems and what you spent already and the mileage I think I just go ahead and find some rebuilt calipers from Amazon Auto Zone whoever and put them on. Don’t bother trying to rebuild the calipers with a kit because the kit cost 2/3 as much is a whole new rebuilt caliper and they’re pretty cheap these days between 35 and $70 typically each.
I live up in the North country Rust Belt area with lots of road salt so Around 100 thousand it’s not a bad time to just switch that stuff out. Don’t feel you got it put new rotors and either just change out what’s bad.Also if you’re cleaning your old ones. make sure the slide bar, that chrome plated rod inside the boot is clean and lubed.


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Hyundai Sonata: Troubleshooting - General Information - Brake System - Hyundai Sonata YF 2011

Pick up a new set of OE rotors from any online Hyundai dealer. My local dealer doesn't price match. If OE rotors are too expensive, RockAuto has a good list of 'coated' solid rotors to pick from. Do not use drilled or slotted rotors. I'd even mount and check the runout of the new rotors.

Get a brake hub cleaning tool. You should not install rotors without cleaning the hubs.
https://www.autozone.com/test-scan-...l/oem-hub-resurfacing-tool-with-pad/13590_0_0
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/3M-07547-Scotch-Brite-Roloc-Cleaning/dp/B0013HHNPY[/ame]

Order front/rear sets of brake pads. Use Raybestos EHT, PowerStop Z23, Wagner Thermoquiets, or Akebono ProAct pads. If EBC is your brand, use the Yellows or the Blacks(Ultimax). At this point, I'd skip the generic 're-boxers'.

EBC Greenstuff should never be used with drilled/slotted rotors.

Either rebuild or replace the calipers. Also get the caliper pin and boot kits. Order front/rear sets of brake hardware kits. I usually use Carlson or Raybestos. I like the new/rebuilt autopart store warranty calipers with brackets... which usually come with all the hardware/pins/boots... I do not use loaded calipers because the pads usually suck. If calipers are recent, then replace all the pins/boots/hardware.

Pick up a can of quality synthetic or silicone brake grease. Silicone is better for pins because some synthetic greases are not compatible with cheap rubber caliper pin boots.

Buy enough cans of brake parts cleaner to clean EVERYTHING before installation. Even your new rotors needs to be cleaned and fingerprint free during installation. You might need to use a dremel with brass/stainless wire brushes to clean everything up, especially where the pads/hardware sits. And,the caliper guide pin bores need to be spotless which might need help from bore/barrel brushes.

Make sure that you have quality or calibrated torque wrenches and torque every not/bolt that you touch. Nothing worse than over-torqued components that cause warping.
Hyundai Sonata: Specifications - General Information - Brake System - Hyundai Sonata YF 2011

You'll also need 2 quarts of brake fluid to siphon/refill the master cylinder and to bleed 8-12 ounces out of each of the 4 bleeders. This is where a 2nd person comes in handy. If no second person is available, you'll need speedbleeders, mityvac, or motivebleeder to assist.

This helps:
Hyundai Sonata: Brake System - Brake System
 
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Front brake disc runout check
1. Place a dial gauge about 5mm (0.2 in.) from the outer circumference of the brake disc, and measure the runout of the disc.
Brake disc runout
Limit: 0.025 mm (0.00098 in.) or less (new one)

2. If the runout of the brake disc exceeds the limit specification, replace the disc, and then measure the runout again.
3. If the runout does not exceed the limit specification, install the brake disc after turning it 180° and then check the runout of the brake disc again.
4. If the runout cannot be corrected by changing the position of the brake disc, replace the brake disc.
Did you check for runout? Had problem with previous car. Had to shim passenger hub. Went through 3 sets of rotors. In 3k pulsation was unbearable. I bought indexing tools from Harbor Frieght and shim from Napa.
 

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Ok guys, i'm on my 3rd set of rotors and pads in 6 months. At 65k i bought a small trailer and se it periodically. Had about 800lbs on it and warped the rotors. I replaced with EBC slotted fronts and green pads which dusted like crazy. Swapped out for ceramic pads and nothing has worked well since.'ve tried the same rotors with Truxp pads front and rear. Rear rotors are AZ duralast premium.
My issue....noise and warpage. I have squealing at speed, and when almost stopped applying brakes, they make a groaning sound...that coincides with the speed of the wheel. It's driving me nuts. I've been doing brakes for 20+ years and have never run into anything like this on a car before.
Sorry for the long question. Also, car now has 128k on it, and i did replace the whole suspension at 115k.
What and where should i start?
your using good stuff, thats not the problem. someone mentioned checking for run out thats where you need to start.

stacked tolerances can cause this, bad hubs and bearings cause this.

Your car is in the mileage where bearings could be a concern, bad bearings = free play which = run out.

If you have been doing brakes for such a long time, i wouldn't doubt your skills for replacing the basic components.

Find a shop that has a PRO CUT on the car brake lathe. The machine automatically calibrates it self and cuts the rotor TO THE CAR. It eliminates run out. If any of the bearings have play in them the machine will pick that up and warn the user that it cannot calibrate it self to the car. This system beats out the old way of Using shims to correct run out. It will cost you a few hours labor but the end result will make you happy. I've personally used this machine on my car and have done hundreds of brake jobs in the shop using it. the end result is always good with a runout of .001 or less. Most dealerships require this equipment in there shops. Call around..

I replaced rear pads/rotors/calipers/hoses/hubs last month on my car. Using a dial indicator on the driver rear i got .001 and pass rear got .002 measurements with my dial indicator. anything more than .002 can lead to pulsations down the road.

EDIT:

Also want to add that using proper torque to tighten wheels is very important. get your self a torque wrench. you can get a decent click type one off amazon for 30-40 bucks, 4% variation. more than sufficient for torquing wheel lug nuts.
 
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EBC Green is a soft pad. Slots/holes will simply grind them down quickly. Use Green with solid blank rotors to avoid tearing 'em up. This is my recommendation based on many years of using EBC products(since mid 1980's). I don't even recommend Green anymore since too many want the cool look of slots and holes.

https://ebcbrakes.com/product/greenstuff-brake-pads/
I have used EBC for years (late 90s) and didn't understand your recommendation. I believe you should state what you quoted to me versus "don't ever use".

I use greens on my passenger cars and yes they do dust but you can't beat the first bite/grab. I, however, use blanks myself as there is no point to slotted or drilled. They are not "lifetime" pads by any means. But I am good with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK guys, some good things to look into thanks. One more point I should have mentioned. Last fall my brakes were bad so I opted to replace everything then. I also had a bad bearing. So I did f/r truth, all 4 bearings, mounts, and front lower control arms. I figured at 100kIsh I would only have to do it once. I will look into factory or better rotors, and pads. I'll have my buddy who's a Toyota master tech help me with the run out. See if they have that machine there. It's getting very frustrating and at 20mph and less that groaning is maddening.
 

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OK guys, some good things to look into thanks. One more point I should have mentioned. Last fall my brakes were bad so I opted to replace everything then. I also had a bad bearing. So I did f/r truth, all 4 bearings, mounts, and front lower control arms. I figured at 100kIsh I would only have to do it once. I will look into factory or better rotors, and pads. I'll have my buddy who's a Toyota master tech help me with the run out. See if they have that machine there. It's getting very frustrating and at 20mph and less that groaning is maddening.
If he works for toyota they should have a pro cut lathe collecting dust someplace in the shop.

Dont waste any more money with replacing pads and rotors. resolve your run out issue.
 
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