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Question for all of you. Today I serviced the front brake pads .. I have a 2016 Hyundai Sonata 2.0T Ultimate (Canada). I have about 23,000km.

I noticed the pads were good .. the passenger front pads wore about 2mm more than driver. I noticed no lube on the metal brackets of the pads or the back of the pad (metal part) that touches the caliper. I lubed this up.

Here is my question ... it was hard to push the brake pads back on. I got them on eventually but is there a reason this was hard or perhaps I was doing it wrong? Any advise is appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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basically you want to avoid metal to metal rubbing between brake pads and hardware kit. You can use lube such as anti-seize. I've also seen people use RTV as well. Don't use flammable lube, if you leave anything on the brake rotor, you may get sticky brake, strange braking noise
 

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Thanks. Yes I used anti-seize (3M brand). It was just hard to put the pads back in place. Got them in eventually. I'm still on OEM hardware kit that came from the factory. Maybe this is normal for the sonatas?
 

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Thanks. Yes I used anti-seize (3M brand). It was just hard to put the pads back in place. Got them in eventually. I'm still on OEM hardware kit that came from the factory. Maybe this is normal for the sonatas?
You really need to use a file and take off the surface rust where the pads go in. Once the rust is removed the pads should slid in easily.
 

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Here is my question ... it was hard to push the brake pads back on. I got them on eventually but is there a reason this was hard or perhaps I was doing it wrong? Any advise is appreciated.
Yes, pushing the brake piston back into the caliper so one can install brake pads is difficult. You're pushing back on the hydraulic pressure of the system. Usually to push them back enough to install new pads, this requires a clamp or big pliers to squeeze them back in.

Personally, I use a clamp that uses a screw to tighten up. But first I put the used pad over the piston to protect it from the clamp. It also even out the pressure on the piston.

Note: On some "rear" calipers, depending upon the e-brake system used, it may require a tool that help to screw the piston back into the caliper.
Front caliper usually don't need this tool.
 
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