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Hyundai Santa Fe, wife and I are interested in that vehicle, didn't know it was using parking brake shoes, now even more interesting.

We are kind of dead with our Elantra Limited if there is more than 4" of snow on the road.

Probably owned more vehicles with drum brakes, the guts are inside the drum protected from road salt. With disc brakes, everything is exposed. With those combination rear disc and parking brake, road salt becomes even a much greater enemy.

Really don't have to replace them if they don't ratchet, can just remove the caliper and screw out the piston by hand so it drags slightly.
 

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great car, i love it. lots of legroom in back for my teenagers, 7 seats in case the relatives visit, pretty economical since its diesel, pulls a trailer really well, never vern stuck in deepmud ir snow never even needed to take the chains out, not even in blizzard conditions on topofmountain pass in italian alps last year
 

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After 30 years the caliper pistons started to leak in my 88 Supra, the rear drum parking brakes looked like new, only time I used those is when parked. Pistons were made of stainless steel, cleaned up like new. Used a cylinder hone to clean up the bore, use brake fluid of lubrication and clean up. Made everything like new again for a total parts cost of $8.00, new piston square ring and the protective boot.

That is on the outside, packed that full of silicone grease to keep out the moisture.

Hyundai copied the gas cap and trunk release levers down by the inside of the drivers door, identical in every aspect the is my 88 Supra. Would have prefered if they copied the rear calipers.

Hooked up my remote starter to where the ABS pump relay plugs in, Hooked up a clear plastic hose to the bleeder, yes, put on Permantex non-hardening gasket maker, held the switch closed on the brake fluid was bubble free.

Have a four way tool to rotate the pistons on other combo rear calipers, worthless on the Hyundai, uses two holes in the piston to adjust those, got by with an extra long nose nose pliers. I set that loose to make sure the parking brake took up the play. Just work it, foot off the brake pedal, in park, engine off to get a hard brake pedal after pushing three times to bleed off the vacuum. Pedal should only go down about a half an inch.

You do not use a large C-clamp to compress the pistons on the rear calipers. Reason for those pad brackets, the brake caliper should slide off after removing the guide pins. Then you can pry out the pads to slide out that pad bracket.

Before they came out with the pad bracket, if you had a wear ridge on the rotors, had to hand grind that off to remove the calipers.
 
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