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Is brake fluid flush a required maintenance on a 2017 Elantra? If so, at what interval? I ask because no where in the maintenance schedule do I see this service as either suggested or required.

Thanks
Michael in NJ
 

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Dot 3 brake fluid is hygroscopic, in English, absorbs moisture, really critical with "worthless" ABS can cause the hydraulic valves to seize so either no ABS for that wheel or no brakes at all. Is a minor air leak in the master cylinder if not, a vacuum would prevent fluid from flowing down. While some vehicle manufactures recommend new fluid once a year, living in road salt country, I feel every three years is enough.

Feel vacuum bleeding is the best and done by two people or one very busy one person. Good to remove the bleeder fitting, coat with non-hardening Permatex gasket maker, this prevents air from leaking past the threads. Using a clear plastic line, want to pump fluid out had to be bubble free and clean looking.

Procedure is rr, lf, lr, rf, the other person stays by the master cylinder and keeps the reservoir filled. If the fluid goes down, air gets trapped in that congress approved piece of crap ABS module, will get air in there and never get it out.

Only way to get it out is need a scanner to activate the ABS pump, with air in there, your brake pedal will go to the floor. Never was a problem without ABS, is now. Optional ABS has a huge ABS pump that can be activated. Shop manual for the congress approved and demanded ABS with a scanner states to activate the ABS pump very briefly or else you will burn the ABS motor out, about the size of a slot car motor.

ABS in a number of different vehicles, all the same piece of crap only pulses one time per second. locks the spin wheel, but if that wheel slid on bare pavement, is wrecking your front suspension. Not fun having a bunch of spoil brat rich kids making stupid laws for our country.

Some Standford Professor was giving a ton of money to say ABS is 14% safer. If you have to slam on your brakes driving on ice or gravel, you are driving way too fast.
 

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At least you can still steer the car under brake lock situations. Yes it's required when the water level gets above 2% which is about every 1 to 3 years depending on car usage and location.
 

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ABS is the opposite of traction control, but done by the same unit,

With ABS if a wheel is locked due to no friction on a moving vehicle, braking to that wheel is interupted by the ABS unit. Based on a weak theory a slightly rotating wheel has more stopping traction than a completely stopped wheel. The friction between that wheel and the road surface can vary from something to nothing, but the results are the same.

So ABS weakens braking while traction control adds braking, but this time to the wheel that is rotating faster than the other wheel opposite to it. Now this time while easing braking with ABS to increase traction, the laws of nature are reversed, adding braking increases traction!

Does this make any sense? Best part of traction control is, you can turn it off. Some GM vehicles are even worse if one wheel slips due to lack of traction going up the hill, the engine is killed. If followed by a vehicle, will get rear ended.

Other enemy is insurance companies, if you are in an accident, your fault or not, if your ABS light is on, you may not be covered. Traction control will never replace a limited slip differential, but sure is cheaper, but sure can't tell this by the way vehicle prices have escalated.
 

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Since Hyundai does not seem to require this it becomes an individual choice. My last car I thought I would have it done as preventative maintenance. Called a few mechanics and they said just wait till brakes are serviced. That was at 200k when I bleed them myself with a one man bleeder when replacing rear wheel cylinders. Now with my Elantra I think I will just wait until brakes are serviced since I still have a lot of warranty left. It is one of those better be safe then sorry scenarios. Do what makes you feel good at night.
 

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Question? Hypothetical. New brake fluid on a new vehicle is clear as water. Aging, 20k for example, turns the fluid to a light honey color, as a couple of you stated.

suppose youused a turkey Baxter to remove not all but most of the honey color and refilled the master cylinder with new clear fluid. Provided, you don’t pout it in and agitate a bunch of bubbles. Do any harm? Hurt brake performance?
 

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Question? Hypothetical. New brake fluid on a new vehicle is clear as water. Aging, 20k for example, turns the fluid to a light honey color, as a couple of you stated.

suppose youused a turkey Baxter to remove not all but most of the honey color and refilled the master cylinder with new clear fluid. Provided, you don’t pout it in and agitate a bunch of bubbles. Do any harm? Hurt brake performance?
i hate this new format on here. No editing privileges?
 

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It's turning color due to water absorption. So just cleaning out the reservoir leaves the old fluid in the lines and pistons. This is where the water laden fluid does the most damage as it becomes corrosive and eats up the steel. Granted it may take years.

Always a good idea to use the turkey baster first to get all the old fluid out when you do a brake fluid flush though.
 

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As condensation resides in the lower part of the caliper, flushing the brake fluid every 2-3 years always a good idea, especially if one intends to keep the car for a long period of time. They do have test strips that one can purchase to see condition of the fluid.
 

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Here's an example of fluid starting to get contaminated. New fluid is very clear with a slight pale yellow tinge.

Doing a proper fluid flush is the only way you get all of it out. Unlike coolant or other fluids, there is no circulation inside the brake system so barely any new fluid makes it down to the calipers. For the $6 a 32oz bottle of DOT 3 and 4 costs, just flush every couple of years or when you see it start turning that color.

442664
 

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I'm going to echo a lot of the above sentiment; If it isn't in the manual as a maintenance item, then it really doesn't need to be done until the brakes are due for service. A simple drain-and-fill is sufficient, as recommended above (turkey baster etc, drain the reservoir, refill with fresh fluid). That will get the majority of the moisture-laden fluid out, and eventually it'll all mingle together and go through the lines and help you retain the original brake feel and performance. If I had kept my car longer than 2 years, I would have done the same thing, just because I enjoy that little extra peace of mind. Then a full drain and fill would be done when the pads are due. Brake fluid is pretty cheap anyhow.

Sometimes fluid is due sooner than brakes, depending on your climate and how many miles you driver per year. I don't put a lot of mileage on my cars (any more) and I live in a place that's pretty dry more than half the year. If I decide to keep my N-Line when the lease is up, I'll do a baste-and-fill, just because it's a little more performance oriented than a base car. But I probably won't otherwise concern myself until pads are due.

For the Elantra sedan, Sport or otherwise, brake fluid INSPECTION is listed as being every 30K miles, under Normal driving conditions. The rest of the detail can be found here: https://www.hyundaiusa.com/maintenance-schedule/index.aspx

Whatever sets your mind at ease. I've owned close to 30 cars already, in my life, and the only time braking performance was ever really a concern or a problem, was when the pads were low, and/or the rotors warped.
 

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Have you really read your owners manual. Hyundai say to replace the brake fluid every 2 years or 30,000kms. Man you must work for a stealership using a turkey baster and only changing whats in the master cylinder reservior. Have you ever seen the muddy crap that first comes out when you start vacuum bleeding? I have seen neglected cars with black brake fluid only to end up getting work when the hot summer comes on and the fluid starts vaporising and ends up with a spongey pedal.
 
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