Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Bother with ACEA A5 oil or just buy fully sinthetic 5w30?

The manual recommands ACEA A5
But also 5W30 oil on the viscosity page.
Nowhere is listed 0w20 or 0w30.

So should I bother finding an A5 oil, or just use any premium 5w30 synthetic oil like mobil1, castrol edge, etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,156 Posts
Manual recommends many options and ACEA A5 is not required. ACEA is a European spec and not common to North America, stuck on API/ILSAC usually obsolete when compared to automaker requirements.

If your engine is a turbo, and with the normal GDI issues, I would recommend ANY 5w40 oil. For colder winter climates, can't go wrong with a 0w40 either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
Manual recommends many options and ACEA A5 is not required. ACEA is a European spec and not common to North America, stuck on API/ILSAC usually obsolete when compared to automaker requirements.

If your engine is a turbo, and with the normal GDI issues, I would recommend ANY 5w40 oil. For colder winter climates, can't go wrong with a 0w40 either.
I'm not in a climate with snowy winters...but our dealer actually recommends and uses 0w-20 synthetic oil for any turbo engines. More and more of the turbos of other brands are also moving customers to 0w-20.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
I use a quality syn 5w-30 in 2013 SFS 2.0T and don't worry about the ACEA A5 spec would be ok with 5w-40 in summer.

While the 0w -20 oils have become much better, it's for max fuel economy that some mfgs recommend, but the oil will be thinner than a 5w30 or 40.
Since you'll get sub par fuel economy anyways with a SFS ulimate model I'd go with the heavier weight.

Could barely believe the EPA rating on the 2019 SF LWB AWDultimate - I think it's 17/22 pathetic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
yeah my 2.0t is horrible for fuel economy, they failed at that. I'd switch it for a 3.5 v6 any day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
I use a quality syn 5w-30 in 2013 SFS 2.0T and don't worry about the ACEA A5 spec would be ok with 5w-40 in summer.

While the 0w -20 oils have become much better, it's for max fuel economy that some mfgs recommend, but the oil will be thinner than a 5w30 or 40.
Actually....the dealer and another source both told me the preference for 0W-20 synthetic oil for the 2.0T turbo engine here was to 1) provide easy engine startup 2) maximize protection/minimize wear during engine startup - prior to when the engine gets warmed up for a couple minutes, and 3) improve fuel mileage.

The thicker the oil...the slower it travels through the various oil chamber locations until it's warmed up. Once warm/hot...there's no longer a significant difference in any of those points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,156 Posts
Read your owners manual. If a dealer recommends 0w20 for a 2.0T, they should be AVOIDED. And, your "another source" recommending 0w20 for a Hyundai/Kia 2.0T doesn't have a clue.

The class action lawsuit and allegedly numerous failures of the 2.4GDI and 2.0T says much concerning stupid dealers and cheapskates pushing the oil change intervals forever to the point of running out of oil, and using overly thin oils with a potentially fuel diluting GDI engine. Obviously, driving style plays a big role with the common failure points of ANY engine, regardless of automaker.

You won't see conventional oil, blends, thins oils, or extended intervals with any of my Hyundai/Kia products. And, you won't see regular/midgrade fuel with ANY of my turbo'd engines.

Unless Hyundai uprev'd the owners manual recently, attached photo is what the 2018 oil chart looks like..... 20 grades aren't used with the 2.0T. 2.0T still has a somewhat classic oil grade/temp recommendation chart including 5w40, 15w40, and 20w50....

Do whatever you want but don't complain when you have a failure.

So, post a picture of your owners manual to see if its any different than this. Be smarter than your dealer or "another source".
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: dreamtheaterr

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
Read your owners manual. If a dealer recommends 0w20 for a 2.0T, they should be AVOIDED. And, your "another source" recommending 0w20 for a Hyundai/Kia 2.0T doesn't have a clue.
That information is totally out of date and incorrect.

The manufacturer's recommendated standards been updated by Hyundai and Kia. A little Google homework would help bring folks more up to date on this topic.

In fact there are 2 Kia dealers and 3 Hyundai dealers within 20 miles of my home, and they are ALL singing the same song - I actually took the time to call each of their service managers when first informed about the 0W-20 synthetic oil. A Honda service center and Acura dealership are also within 5 miles here. They all told me the very same thing.

...and it's not just Hyundai/Kia. Nor is this new...Honda, Toyota, and others have recommended 0W-20 synthetic for years.

Fact is...it costs a bit more, which is why some folks avoid it.

Perhaps a bit more research would help uncover the correct information:

https://mobiloil.com/en/viscosity/0w-20

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2012/09/fuel-economy-race-brings-expensive-oil-to-inexpensive-cars/index.htm

https://www.cars.com/articles/2013/08/expensive-oil-changes-are-here-to-stay/

http://www.autonews.com/article/20170821/RETAIL05/170829991/ow-16-engine-oil-in-united-states
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
All those links mention fuel economy as the primary reason for development of lower viscosity oils, in my 2013 owners manual the recommend viscosity is 5w-30 or 10w-30 depending on the winter temps. So what has Hyundai changed from sometime between 2013 and today- it's been discussed here - lower capacity oil pump and smaller diameter oil passages - all in the interest of attempting to improving fuel economy, IMO they would be better served working on friction losses in the drivetrain and reducing unsprung weight - as many cars with better mpg ratings have done.
So for my car I am staying with 5w-30, per the owners manual recommendation and for a turbo engine for later model 2.0T owners I would recommend using a 5w-30 or 0w -30 so long as the owner's manual specs that as an approved viscosity. In higher temps - such as oil encounters from cooling the turbo bearing - a lower viscosity oil will thin more, any SAE viscosity chart will show that, so I'll gladly sacrifice the few pennies of gas saved and stay with my owner's manual recommendation.
The 0w-20 oil is all about fuel economy and additional profit for the producers, up next the even pricier oils marketed to control GDI carbon buildup. The reality is not a whole lot of difference between a 5w-30 and 0w -20 oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
One other thought - it is interesting that Hyundai/KIA, the shortest OCI mfg out there is now recommending 0w-20 - I may be wrong but isn't that mostly produced as a synthetic oil ? So do they allow for a longer oci if you use a 0w-20 - as the other mfgs you mention do ?
Looks like Hyundai is now slyly moving people to synthetic oils - while keeping their same outdated oci intervals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,156 Posts
I don't care about other automaker's recommendations. The GDI 2.0T is Hyundai/Kia's nightmare, not Toyota's or Honda's or whatever automakers left. Other automakers recommend stuff that they design/build their engines for. My neighbors new Camry takes 0w16.... This doesn't mean I'll use it in my Hyundai. Pretty lame logic there. BMW uses a 10w60... maybe we all should use a 10w60? And, the SRT Mopars use a 0w40, which seems to be the newest spec for Corvettes now too.

Please list the dealers providing the 0w20 recommendation for the 2.0T. And, show the owners manual or TSB that recommends it for the 2.0T. Should be easy enough to provide the proof.

Synthetic costs more.... doesn't make a difference if its 0w20 or not.

And, none of your links provides any 0w20 info relevant to the Hyundai 2.0T's needs, requirements, or recommendations. No facts provided so don't use that word fact in your useless argument. You are seriously misinformed on the needs/requirements on the 2.0T.
 
  • Like
Reactions: joegr

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
my manual recommends 5w30 so that's what I bought. Mobil 1 had a rebate on it so I grabbed that.
Thanks all.

What about the filter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
my manual recommends 5w30 so that's what I bought. Mobil 1 had a rebate on it so I grabbed that.
Thanks all.

What about the filter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
I don't care about other automaker's recommendations.


Please list the dealers providing the 0w20 recommendation for the 2.0T. And, show the owners manual or TSB that recommends it for the 2.0T. Should be easy enough to provide the proof.
Seriously? The links in my previous post prove this from the both oil manufacturer AND some auto manufacturers perspective. Hyundai's documentation isn't current, but the 2019 models should have the newer info on the turbo engine oil.

I can't speak to your 8-year old Sonata...and have to question why you are even interested...but for 2017 & newer Hyundai turbos..this applies.

Go prove it to yourself. It took me all of 45 minutes to contact all of the Hyundai and 1 Kia dealers in my area. Two Hyundai and one Kia dealership is owned by the same large dealer group. I specifically asked for the service managers to discuss this topic.

For those using 5W-30 - that won't cause harm, but 0W-20 is now quickly becoming the preferred standard for nearly all auto manufacturers, in particular for turbo engines.

Feel free to do your own homework. If you don't want to be informed, that's fine. I prefer to do maintenance that will provide longevity to my engine and sustain my warranty - that means documented service work by the dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
If memory serves me correctly, this is the same poster that was running 26 psi in their tires because the dealer said that was the correct air pressure. Of course dealers want people to switch to 0w-20 oil changes because it fattens their margins, the op made the right decision in following the owners manual and choosing 5w-30 oil for a 2.0T engine., which was the only engine relevant to this discussion - not Honda, not Toyota.
 
  • Like
Reactions: solman98

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
People are free to use whatever oil they wish provided they are not concerned about warranty.

If a person is a very experienced chemical and mechanical engineer they may be in a better position to provide an informed view on oil selection rather than accept the opinion of a dealership or independent operator or internet blogger.

Why people will not accept what the owner’ manual states is beyond me.

If in doubt email Hyundai as I have done and get an answer in writing and you will find the overriding requirements are based on the viscosity of the oil for the operating conditions. You may then use Dino or the synthetic oil of your choice .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
If a person is a very experienced chemical and mechanical engineer they may be in a better position to provide an informed view on oil selection rather than accept the opinion of a dealership or independent operator or internet blogger.

W.
As it so happens I possess a degree in mechanical engineering - but that really has no relevance nor qualifies me as an expert, I can however read my owners manual as well as having a good understanding regards viscosity as it applies to motor oils and my autos never are subject to the dealership or repair shops with the exception of warranty work, tire changes and wheel alignments. So I would list basic mistrust of the dealership as my foremost qualification.
Having said the above using the internet I was able to dismount and replace the valve stem on my 14 yr old donut - when tire shops declined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
Of course dealers want people to switch to 0w-20 oil changes because it fattens their margins, the op made the right decision in following the owners manual and choosing 5w-30 oil for a 2.0T engine., which was the only engine relevant to this discussion - not Honda, not Toyota.
There is truth in the fact that the prices are higher for 0W-20...no dispute there at all...in fact...I mentioned that earlier.

Just for kicks & giggles...I called another Hyundai dealership this morning in another large city in a neighboring state. I patiently waited for the service manager. After providing some background...he and I discussed this topic for about 15 minutes.

A few things he shared:

1) The current owners manual provides recommended oil choices.
2) In the case of the 2018 (or 2017) Hyundai 2.0 turbo (Theta II) engine, there are actually 5 oil velocities that are acceptable in that engine - the difference being the average operating temperature and climate of the vehicle. It's in Section 8, page 8.
3) The oils considered "recommended: are: 5w-30, 5w-40, 10w-30, 15w-40, and 20w-50. Again, the climate/operating temperatures govern the best choices - so someone in Florida and Alaska will likely use different options.
4) 0w-20 synthetic oil is indeed fine for this engine, in fact, more of the Hyundai dealerships are starting to adopt it, even though "it hasn't made it into the manuals yet". I was told "What is driving the 0w-20 synthetic oils in more and more vehicles is a combination of the better gas mileage and minimized wear & tear at startup". He added "it comes down to owner preference as far as what oil they can use...all of these fulfill the warranty requirements, especially if a Hyundai dealer uses it during an oil change there."
5) One added item, he said "dealerships change brands of oil all the time. It comes down to the price when they get these in 55-gallon drums, We've used 4 different brands in just the past year alone here".

So...enjoy your oil changes...there isn't any real drama involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
This was not an attack on you or your views, but rather and attempt to provide what I thought was helpful information. In relation to internet bloggers I was referring to dangerous and incorrect information that is sometimes posted on many forums. I do not have a degree in mechanical engineering. I am just a retired Aircraft maintenance engineer who held FAA and Casa certification in avionics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
This was not an attack on you or your views, but rather and attempt to provide what I thought was helpful information.
No worries...appreciate the many contributions by folks at this site.

I have the good fortune to visit your fine nation later this year (Sydney anyway), and I welcome your input.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top