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I am wondering why there is a difference in the MPG rating on the Blue vs the SEL versions of the Ioniq. I thought it might be the rim and tire size but on the window stickers I have seen (from online dealer sites) both come with the 195/15 rims and tires. They are both listed as eco-spokes as well. Is this correct?

Looking to get my Ioniq this week.:grin2: I will probably still go with the Blue as it has everything I want like CC, bluetooth and Android Auto. I do like the LED DRLs on the SEL but not enough to cough up another 2k, especially when losing a few MPGs.
 

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The two big differences I see are in the front of the car and the wheel covers, as well as the molding on the side of the car on the SEL. While their is a bit of weight difference, I suspect it is the aerodynamics that provide most of the fuel economy gains on the Blue.
 

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Wheels have a lot to do with it. On our Blue we actually went from the 15" with aero hub caps to actual alloy rims and 16" tires and MPG dropped about 8 mpg. We just put the 15" stock setup back on and MPG picked right back up.
 

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If you're talking about the difference in the US EPA fuel economy ratings, it's an artifact of the way the cars are tested and the 36 pound weight difference between the Blue and the SEL. In the early days of testing, a weight was attached to the dynamometer's flywheel to simulate the car's weight. To keep the number of weights that had to be on site reasonable, the EPA lumped cars into inertia classes separated by 125 pounds. The Ioniq Blue and Prius Eco exploit the inertia clumping by removing enough weight to barely drop into the class below the SEL (and whatever the "standard" Prius is called). Then they are tested as though they weigh 125 pounds less, which gives a little better fuel economy figure. In actual use, there's no significant difference between the models. Last year on fuelly.com, I found 27 Blue drivers averaging 50.8 US miles per gallon, and 37 SEL drivers averaging 53.1.

To make the story stranger, modern dynamometers do not use physical flywheels to simulate car weight, so the weight classes are unnecessary.
 

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There's going to be more rolling resistance with bigger wheels and tires. I have a Limited and the mileage is quite disappointing. Unfortunately I'm getting older and had to have good headlights, so the Limited was the only choice.
 

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Bigger tires yes, more weight yes. Besides tires you have heated mirrors that add to weight, all the extras put into it add weight and it also drains more energy. Its the weight to energy required to move and the blue weighs the least
 

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There's going to be more rolling resistance with bigger wheels and tires. I have a Limited and the mileage is quite disappointing. Unfortunately I'm getting older and had to have good headlights, so the Limited was the only choice.
I think you will find the larger the wheel the lower the rolling resistance....assuming same cross section of tyre and pressure. :unsure:
 
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