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Its not necessarily a faulty design, it was more of faulty process at the Alabama plant. I wonder what the percentage of failed engines will ultimately be.
 

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Finally, now we know for sure

Straight from Hyundai Motor -

Date: September 24, 2015


Subject: Recall Campaign 132: 2011-2012 YF Sonata GDI Engine Inspection/Replacement

What You Need to KNOW -

Hyundai will soon announce, but not yet launch, a safety recall involving 2011-2012 model year YF Sonata vehicles with GDI engine (hybrid Sonata vehicles of these model years are not impacted).
Thank you Sbr 711 for the info. Finally, we have definitive proof that a lot of the 2.4 L spun rod bearings were caused by defective manufacturing.

I'm especially pleased to see this mandate from Hyundai to the dealers: "Provide the customer with a Service Rental Car if any interim engine repairs are needed." I hope Hyundai makes the same requirement when the recall procedures for repairing/replacing 2.4L engines are published.
 

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doesn't cover oil consumption, running out of oil, or ...

Dealers will inspect the cars and replace engines at no cost to owners, a company spokesman said. The company also will increase the engine warranty for 10 years or 120,000 miles. Inspect??? Not knocking so keep your old engine and here is your new warranty?

Hyundai discovered the problem when owners started reporting engine noise. I guess the multiple class actions had nothing to do with it.

What about the failures manufactured after April 2012?
Or the owners out of warranty who already paid? Reimbursement time?

The company said that the 2011 Sonata was the first Hyundai vehicle to use engines made in Alabama, where the company initially used a mechanical process to remove machining debris from the crankshaft. That process was changed to a high pressure wet blasting system in April of 2012.
I guess that they are not blaming southern work ethic. I wonder what that so-called 'mechanical process' is that is being blamed.

This, btw, doesn't have anything to do concerning 'oil consumption' or 'running out of oil', ....

How to make your engine knock? Run it without oil for a few minutes, refill, and go to dealer for an 'inspection'. >:D

Gm' methods sure is cheaper:
2015 Corvette Z06 Engine Failure Solution | GM Authority
 

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This, btw, doesn't have anything to do concerning 'oil consumption' or 'running out of oil', ....

How to make your engine knock? Run it without oil for a few minutes, refill, and go to dealer for an 'inspection'. >:D

Gm' methods sure is cheaper:
2015 Corvette Z06 Engine Failure Solution | GM Authority
It said the problem of debris would stop the oil from circulating properly. Could this cause the oil consumption?
 

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Took my 2012 Sonata to the local dealer and showed him the recall. He said they knew about it but had not received final word from Hyundai yet, but was expecting itn in the next few weeks. Asked me to return next month. This is the dealer that does my oil changes by the way.

No issues with the car yet- just playing it safe and advising them. Will bring it back next month-- they also mentioned that I would be getting a letter directly from Hyundai in October.
 

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No, it shouldn't cause oil consumption. It's only reducing/blocking flow to that single component which then should fail.

Anything that washes back down into the oil pan should be stopped by the pickup screen or caught by that useless appendage called the "oil filter", hopefully when i t is not in bypass.

I call BS because the failure would be rapid on any oil starved bearing.

I would wager toward more rapid wear caused by 'streaks' in the bearing as the machining debris is recirculated and finally caught by the filter or drained out during the 1st oil change. Damage was done initially, and at the mercy of whatever is left of the bearing surface for the future.

If that debris is larger than the clearance, then it will 'grind' away that component quickly or block oil flow. Failure would be pretty quick.

Obviously, if the manufacturing method was changed from mechanical process(probably media blasting) to liquid power washing, then the issue has been known since before the 'change over'. The inadequate manufacturing process was replaced by an adequate one. What employees did the visual inspection or assembly? Or is it overly automated? Robots can't see swarf. Or an employee just didn't care.
 

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No, it shouldn't cause oil consumption. It's only reducing/blocking flow to that single component which then should fail.

Anything that washes back down into the oil pan should be stopped by the pickup screen or caught by that useless appendage called the "oil filter", hopefully when i t is not in bypass.
thanks for the detailed explanation. What's the oil filter joke here i'm missing?
 

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No, it shouldn't cause oil consumption. It's only reducing/blocking flow to that single component which then should fail.

Anything that washes back down into the oil pan should be stopped by the pickup screen or caught by that useless appendage called the "oil filter", hopefully when i t is not in bypass.

I call BS because the failure would be rapid on any oil starved bearing.

I would wager toward more rapid wear caused by 'streaks' in the bearing as the machining debris is recirculated and finally caught by the filter or drained out during the 1st oil change. Damage was done initially, and at the mercy of whatever is left of the bearing surface for the future.

If that debris is larger than the clearance, then it will 'grind' away that component quickly or block oil flow. Failure would be pretty quick.

Obviously, if the manufacturing method was changed from mechanical process(probably media blasting) to liquid power washing, then the issue has been known since before the 'change over'. The inadequate manufacturing process was replaced by an adequate one. What employees did the visual inspection or assembly? Or is it overly automated? Robots can't see swarf. Or an employee just didn't care.
I think we are getting an oversimplified explanation from HMA. Remember back in the old days, we changed oil for the first time at 1000 miles to supposedly remove the metal shavings from the mfg process? If the oil has been changed several times (considering these cars at 4-5 years old), wouldn't any debris be gone by now, either exiting thru the oil filter or the draining process?

There has to be more to this story!
 

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It sounds like those early engine builders were just blowing out the passages instead of cleaning them. I was taught that the last cleaning step in engine building was to flush out all passages with hot soapy water, since solvents were great at cutting grease/oil, but detergents are needed to lift out and transport fine metal contaminants. If you don't do this before assembly, the engine oil will do it for you during the first hours of operation and the bearings will suffer. I would think the damage from this would all be done early on but could shorten engine life due to scarred bearings.

Many engine designs have natural steps, stubs or pockets in the oil passages where in theory, larger particles could remain trapped for an extended period. I see Hundai is now saying trapped metal particles may be restricting oil flow. Those are some big particles. There are also some posts about GDI engines building up excess carbon on the intake valves. I can believe pieces of that may cause damage to the upper end, but I would not think it would ever make it past a properly operating filter.
 

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Closing thread - job well done

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread. This thread was started because there were a number of engine failures with most caused by spun rod bearings. We've had a lot of good discussion about potential engine defects and, even, whether or not there was a defect. No doubt in my mind that this discussion was one of the factors that caused Hyundai to make a public response.

FINALLY, Hyundai admitted factory errors and issued a recall. The purpose of this thread in determining if there were significant defects causing catastrophic engine failures has been met. Now we move into the next phase which is the actual recall. So, I'm closing this thread.

However, there is a recall thread that includes recall discussion and provides ongoing information related to the recall. The recall thread is located here: http://www.hyundai-forums.com/yf-2011-sonata-i45/414281-recall-connecting-rod-wear-may-result-engine-stall.html

Again, thanks to everyone who read, watched and/or who contributed to this thread. Good job!!!
 

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Thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread. This thread was started because there were a number of engine failures with most caused by spun rod bearings. We've had a lot of good discussion about potential engine defects and, even, whether or not there was a defect. No doubt in my mind that this discussion was one of the factors that caused Hyundai to make a public response.

FINALLY, Hyundai admitted factory errors and issued a recall. The purpose of this thread has been met. Now we move into the next phase which is the actual recall. So, I'm closing this thread.

However, there is a recall thread that includes recall discussion and provides ongoing information related to the recall. The recall thread is located here: http://www.hyundai-forums.com/yf-2011-sonata-i45/414281-recall-connecting-rod-wear-may-result-engine-stall.html

Again, thanks to everyone who read, watched and/or who contributed to this thread. Great job!!!
the lawsuit is a bigger issue than the recall. unless the lawsuit ended, the recall is just 1 bandaid hyundai is trying to use. close the recall thread and keep talking in this thread of whether the recall really addresses all the causes of engines seizing
 

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the lawsuit is a bigger issue than the recall. unless the lawsuit ended, the recall is just 1 bandaid hyundai is trying to use. close the recall thread and keep talking in this thread of whether the recall really addresses all the causes of engines seizing
I appreciate your perspective. But, this thread has over 700 posts. If anything happens in the class action law suits, it can be addressed in the Recall thread or, if it has significant impact, a new class action suit thread can be started.

However, to give this thread prominence so members and visitors can quickly find it, we will probably turn this thread into a sticky.
 
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