Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I decided I wanted to go ahead and buy a K&N Air filter so I wouldn't have to buy anymore air filters . The cheapest I found for the 2018 sonata on ebay was 74 dollars with free shipping and 62 dollars with free shipping on amazon.

Anyways if anyone is looking for one, amazon is 12 dollars cheaper and you do need to make sure on amazon you click for free shipping or sign up for their prime membership with free shipping.

Not sure why but 15-17 sonata's K&N Air filters on ebay was a lot less. I didnt think the 2.4 engine has changed any but to be safe I stay with the ones for the 2018
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
A lot of times you’ll find that things are cheaper on eBay. Lol. Amazon Prime is also a godsend when you buy a lot of stuff from there. I love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
A lot of times you’ll find that things are cheaper on eBay. Lol. Amazon Prime is also a godsend when you buy a lot of stuff from there. I love it.
yes ebay has the best prices most of the time which is why I was shocked amazon beat ebay on price but I am glad I look on amazon before I brought it from ebay, There is 2 on ebay with best offer and both will not go below 73.50
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
I’m due for a new filter soon and the K&N would be a good fit but I haven’t really gotten any input on them. I tried searching for reviews but they don’t seem to be around anywhere. Let us know how the filter is I’ll be looking forward to it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
I’m due for a new filter soon and the K&N would be a good fit but I haven’t really gotten any input on them. I tried searching for reviews but they don’t seem to be around anywhere. Let us know how the filter is I’ll be looking forward to it!


Check on some JDM forums (DriveAccord, Acurazine), we LOVE them!
 

·
Registered
2017 Sonata Sport 2.0T
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
K & N filters for cars are like asking what oil is best, a lot of opinions on them.

This is mine...

The stock OEM air filter will usually provide better filtration than a K&N, Oil suspension filters require correct maintenance to make them work correctly, too much oil and it will possibly decrease flow and also put filtering oil into the intake. , too little and it will not be as efficient in collecting / filtering. Performance wise on a stock engine your stock set up gives more than enough flow to meet the engine demands, you wont gain performance by dropping in a K&N other than the placebo effect.

In the Mercedes performance forum I used to be on they flow tested the stock "Mann" air filter vs K&N and the filtration and flow was better with the stock paper over K&N. Advantage for K&N is never buy another, Disadvantage requires maintenance and if not done correctly will not work as well as stock paper.

I change my air filter every 10,000 miles and can get stock filters for $10-12 so for the $80 for a K&N I can get close to 7 OEM good for 70,000 - 80,000 miles and no maintenance.

I'm a big believer and user of K&N in other uses, all my dirt bikes and quad, tractor have always used K&N or a foam oiled filter because of the high amount of dirt they are exposed to.

Our cars dont have MAF sensor but Ive heard of the improperly maintained K&N causing oil to cause problems with intake on injected cars especially those with MAF and the dealer in most cases will not cover repair since it was a result of the oil filtration vs the paper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
It would take me many changes of an OEM air filter before I break even with K&N . Given an engine air filter is changed roughly every 30K miles, am talking over 150K miles to break even. Some things, it's worth keeping simple and moving on. Each scenario has their own usage case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I had one before in a cavalier of mine back in 1997, I do remember getting better mpg, though I dont recall it being faster but then again I dont recall much from 1997 but I do remember getting more out of a tank full of gas, so if this does get me more miles out of a tank of gas, that will be worth it aloine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
I change my air filter every 10,000 miles

Air filters get more efficient as they load with dirt and close up the larger pores.
So changing the filter so often lets more dirt through.
I put a restriction gauge on my last car and replaced the filter when the restriction increased by half what the filter makers recommend, after 43,000 miles.



https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/4600881


So instead of changing the filter at some arbitrary one-size-fits-all distance I get a fuller use based on performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
I pulled the trigger and decided to order one earlier today. I never had any experience with K&N filters so this will determine my future with their products. I hear mixed reviews about whether or not they do what they’re supposed to do but I’ll never really know unless I try myself! It will be arriving on Friday and I will drop it in as soon as I can. Upon review I’ll report back!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
well with my stock filter I get 446 of driving miles to a tank of fuel which is roughly 85% highway driving and 15% city driving from 4 days of driving 55.8 one way from home to work so 55.8 times 8 times. I always have to fill up my tank on the 4th day when I get home from work there is a few miles left which is roughly 22 miles left to a tank or less depending on my driving habits.. I hope it will end up being 30 to 40 miles left after the K&N air filter, if not, I will let you all know. It should arrive Thursday so by the end of next week I will know if it was worth the 62 dolllars or not. also my sonata climbs a mountain each day on Interstate 70 in maryland going back home to Hagerstown so my gas mileage might seem less then to others because of that and I do trend to do 80 mph most of the way though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
My experience with K&N is they are a waste of money....if you want a good aftermarket filter look for Wix brand for example. Cheers p

ps just some advise - before you install lay the K&N on newspaper to soak up the excess oil so you can avoid an oil film on the sensors......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #15

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I wouldn't recommend for anyone to use K & N engine air filters. My mechanic advised us not to use them as they get vehicle's in that have issues from them such as the Mass Air Flow Sensor being triggered because of how they do/do not allow air to flow through them. He recommended that we stick with the brand installed by the manufacturer. I typically replace ours once per year, especially in my car since I drive some gravel roads every now and then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,327 Posts
Improperly oiled K&N type filters will coat the MAF sensor and cause it to fail.
Luckily, the LF does not have a MAF sensor so you're safe there but I only use dry type filters as to not add additional oil to the intake system.
Instead of an oil coated filter I have used Apexi style dry, cone filters in the past on warm or cold air intakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I wouldn't recommend for anyone to use K & N engine air filters. My mechanic advised us not to use them as they get vehicle's in that have issues from them such as the Mass Air Flow Sensor being triggered because of how they do/do not allow air to flow through them. He recommended that we stick with the brand installed by the manufacturer. I typically replace ours once per year, especially in my car since I drive some gravel roads every now and then.

https://www.knfilters.com/maf/massair.htm K&N claims they will go to bat for the consumer and make the dealer prove it was the K&N and so far not once case where a dealer claimed a sensor went bad could be proved to be the result of a K&N air filter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
from K&N > n the last 7 years, we have had more than 300 actual sensors sent to us by consumers with documents showing dealerships claimed our product had caused them to fail. Microscopic, electronic and chemical testing revealed that none of these sensors were contaminated by K&N oil (K&N Detailed MAF Sensor Test Results). What is perhaps the single biggest clue to what is going on is that over 50% of these sensors sent to us were not broken in the first place for any reason. Click here for more information on how this may happen.


from click here

Microscope Lab TestingK&N Lab Testing
When K&N obtains a MAF sensor in question, our laboratory technicians:
Inspect it under a microscope to screen for contamination that may be present.
Electrically test for MAF sensor failure by confirming output calibration readings.
Perform chemical analysis of sensors to determine the source of the contamination where any is present.
Audit chemical analysis through work with an independent laboratory.
Interact directly with the dealership involved to supplement with additional facts.
Below are some of the relevant findings:
1. K&N's laboratory technicians tested an over-oiled K&N air filter at a rate of 1,000 Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) on our Filtration Test Stand which utilizes an absolute filter. An absolute filter is one specified by ISO 5011 (SAE testing protocol) which is used to capture test dust that passes through a filter during efficiency testing. In this case, an absolute filter was used to capture any filter oil leaving the filter and to allow us to measure any oil migration from the filter. We weighed the absolute filter before and after the test and confirmed that oil does not migrate from a K&N air filter – even at CFMs far in excess of those seen in production engines.

K&N Air Filter Testing K&N Air Flow Testing
2. We coated both hot wire and film style sensors with K&N filter oil in both controlled (laboratory) and uncontrolled (real world) environments - none triggered check engine lights. We created extreme conditions, beyond anything an engine would ever experience such as submersing a MAF sensor in filter oil and monitored the sensor readings while spraying it with test dust. Even under these circumstances, the MAF sensor was not damaged. In addition, we were able to take this same MAF sensor, clean it, and found that the readings were identical to the ones taken prior to the extreme testing.

3. A majority of the "failed" sensors we retrieved from dealerships had not failed at all. They tested to be functioning within normal operating parameters as calibrated against new sensors purchased through dealership parts and service departments.

4. Few, if any, automotive dealership service centers have the testing equipment to authenticate a mass airflow sensor failure.

5. Many of the sensors tested were self-contaminated by the silicone potting compound used in the manufacture of the MAF. Some manufacturers have issued TSB's (Technical Service Bulletins) advising dealerships of the occurrence of MAF's contaminating themselves with their own silicone potting compound.

6. Sensors fail and are even the subject of full recalls by vehicle manufacturers. For information on recalls visit: www.recalls.gov.

For a list of our MAF sensor testing results along with the dealerships involved go to our MAF Sensor Test Results page.



K&N MAF Sensor Test Results - January 2004 through December 2017
K&N has millions of satisfied customers, yet we do occasionally get instances where a dealership or service provider has blamed our product for a vehicle problem. We attempt to resolve these misunderstandings by speaking directly to the service technicians. In any event, we take care of the consumer through our Consumer Protection Pledge. In issues regarding MAF sensors, we have been able to recover many of the allegedly "bad" sensors and test them to diagnose the actual cause of the failure. In most of these cases the "bad" sensor was actually functioning properly and was misdiagnosed by the dealership or service provider. The diagram below is a summary of our findings.

K&N MAF Sensor Test Chart

Of the 139 sensors we received that were truly malfunctioning, 46 had a complete electronic failure in which the sensor's voltage output was a flat line, generally caused by a connection or circuitry problem within the sensor. When a sensor is responsive but it's voltage output is not within the normal limits we refer to this as "out of range". This condition can be caused by circuitry problems and it can also be caused by a sensor's thermistor becoming dirty or contaminated. We sent 34 out of range sensors to an independent laboratory for an elemental and chemical analysis and the majority of them were found to have silicone as the contaminant.

Silicone is used on the circuitry of these sensors because it acts as an excellent thermal and electrical insulator, inherently sticks to most surfaces, and is resistant to moisture and heat. Some MAF sensors use a high temperature burn-off cycle to eliminate normal engine contaminants from the sensor. Silicone is resistant to this process.

Thermistors are used in MAF sensors to measure the transfer of heat from the thermistor to the air passing by the sensor. A thermistor's resistance changes as its surrounding temperature changes. The greater the air mass and air flow the greater the transfer of heat. When a thermistor is "silicone contaminated" the thermistor becomes insulated and can result in an out of range condition.

In addition to out of range sensors, functioning and failed sensors have also been sent to an independent forensic laboratory for analysis. A few of these sensors were found to have trace amounts of oil on the thermistor. The amount of oil was so minimal that an accurate analysis of the oil's source could not be determined. The trace amount of oil can conceivably be found from two possible sources: fuel in the combustion chamber or motor oil used as an engine lubricant that gets suspended in crankcase vapor. Our experience in the lab is that trace amounts of oil don't change the sensitivity of the sensor enough to cause an "out of range" electronic signal. Furthermore our testing has shown that K&N air filter oil will not come off a K&N air filter even in extreme conditions. More on this topic here.

As of the date of our last test shown below, K&N air filter oil cannot be confirmed as the source of contamination on a sensor nor can any oil type be attributed to a sensor’s failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
After reading the above I feel confident a sensor would not be effected by this but also as Grady wilson said, our sonata's do not have a MAF sensor.. Ultimately anything we change on our cars will always run a chance of something going wrong. I am going give the K&N air filter a try but I do want to thank you for wanting to make me aware of such a possibility .
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top