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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I'm new to the forum, i bought my first Accent about 2 weeks ago, a second hand one but i'm very happy with it... Its a 2008 SE(123,000Km) i think, power sunroof..etc..

Ok i read that Accent need 6 liter of oils ATF SP III
and my oil was brownish a bit

so i bought 2 of 5-liters valvoline maxlife at walmart

I drain the front trany plug and refill only with 2-3 liters of oils!!! Wasn't it suppose to be 6 liters? Is there something I doing wrong? Is there another drain plug i forgot, do i have to change the filter?

By the way I read a few pages in this forum, very informative ...
Thanks
 

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When the plug is removed, it drains out basically what is in the pan only. The torque converter is still full of oil, as is the oil cooler, lines, and oil filter if that model has one. Doing it the way you are, it is only a partial change.
To get all the fluid changed out at once, you need a tranny flush machine to force all the old fluid out.
 

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:00000732:

As was mentioned, draining the pan will only get you so much with the remainder being elsewhere. You're probably not even getting all of it out of the pan considering the location of the drain plug on the front of the pan being up a little bit from the bottom.

I generally got about 2.25 qts per drain. Repeated drain & fills was my preferred method to gradually replace the old fluid and introduce new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I should do another drain every week or so with 2-3 liters? To get eventually get new oil in it without having a trainny flush from Hyundai? Cheaper that way i think

Or did you repeat and refills one after another the same day?
 

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I should do another drain every week or so with 2-3 liters? To get eventually get new oil in it without having a trainny flush from Hyundai? Cheaper that way i think

Or did you repeat and refills one after another the same day?
You could, but don't forget that doing drain & refills will result in the law of diminishing returns. In theory you could do 2-3 drain and refills in a day to "flush" out most of the old stuff. You simply Drain, fill the same amount that came out, drive around the block until everything is warm (let it cool enough to work on it safely), then repeat. Follow instructions to check your fluid levels & should be good to go!

I forget the exact math offhand but being that the accent is smaller after about 3 drain & fills your really not going to get much more of the old stuff out with anymore. As has been stated before, generally the dealership only does one, without even a filter change.

If you don't have any record of the filter having been changed what I'd recommend with the mileage it has is to drain, drop the pan, and do so. This would give you that one more drain & fill while at the same time allowing you to check the magnets in the pan to see if the tranny is wearing normally. Some amount of metal on them is normal. It's only if you see an excess that there might be something wrong.

As for the fluid you used, there's some debate as to whether aftermarket "compatible" fluids are better/worse. If you wanna stay stock, not sure about your market but in the U.S. NAPA carries the "ENEOS" brand of SPIII. It's one of few (if not the only one) brands that have an SPIII ONLY fluid and by all accounts seems to be the OEM supplier to Hyundai. So it should be the same stuff the Dealership uses, but significantly cheaper.

On the other hand, you guys up north seem to get more engine options than us. Including maybe Diesel? :mad:
 

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you need a tranny flush machine to force all the old fluid out.
absolutely 100% false.

guys, there are far better ways to change fluid yourself and do the job right. driving around the block is outright insane, bubba.

fonzy, it sounds like you are on the right track so i'll give you a few options and keep them brief on how i do this job at home.

- drain pan (you'll need to again since fluid has mixed.)

- drop pan and clean magnets. some consider it optional, but i like to replace the filter while i'm there. gasket is a must in my mind. consider cost vs. gasket failure...

- reinstall pan with new gasket, refill trans.

- now the fun part, cheap flush. there are a couple ways:

1. disconnect outlet from trans line. the one that flows fluid into the cooler at bottom of the rad. put that in your drain pan. get another piece of hose and connect to the trans cooler (this is now a suction line), put that in fresh fluid. turn car on. flush until its clean. i like this method because you are changing fluid in the cooler as well. just be careful not to run out of fresh fluid! don't let it suck air.

2. same as above, but instead of turning car on put a drill pump on it. for those curious, this is pretty much what the flush machines are.

3. last method sucks but it works. bleed off about 1L at a time through the outlet line and refill...less to be careful, its a small trans. kind of hard to recommend this method due to the extra time needed and the mess it makes but it does work.

search youtube, there are many good videos on these exact methods.
 

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I wouldn't call it insane, many people use the method I describe & Eric the Car Guy mentions that was Honda's 'official' recommendation until they started using flush machines.

While your method is the best & most complete I didn't know the OP's mechanical experience and didn't want to confuse him any more. Besides, as has been discussed in the past, anything past 1 drain & fill is more than what MOST Hyundai Dealerships even do. So his 1 drain and fill + a filter change would be most likely fine.
 

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I had heard that about Honda. And heard that sometimes they didn't even get the vehicle down off the lift between d&f's.

I dumped mine every other oil change for a while to slowly cycle some of that old stuff out. While certainly not better than a full fluid exchange, it did keep a nice red color on the dipstick.
 

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there is no reason to be driving it around to circ the fluid unless you enjoy wasting your day. good thing we're not talking about hondas here...if you're really worried about the heat, do the job while the car is hot.

yes this is more than what just about every mechanic does. just about every mechanic also doesn't do this job right either. kind of like ramming everything down with air tools on full bore instead of using a torque wrench.

to fonzy: if the pan magnets have been cleaned out already, i would not bother dropping it on second thought. skip that step and go with drain, refill and then flush. unless you want to get at the filter that is.
 

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I dumped mine every other oil change for a while to slowly cycle some of that old stuff out.
that's actually a very good idea. i like it. considering the length of the flush interval for an auto trans and how often you're changing the oil, you're probably doing better than the maintenance schedule by doing that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I did it this weekend..
I started to do a transmission flush, i look at the hose in bottom of radiator, and i had to get the fan out of the way, .. so i skip it. Instead i went for the filter change, jack my car on 2 jack stand , try to pry the oil pan, it wouldn't budge, i didn't want to warp the pan and i didn't have enough room under to work it.. and i saw that it had orange silicone gasket, so i presume that the filter had been change.. so i skip it and torque the pan bolt at 8 lb-ft.. and did 2 drain oil plug instead.. the oil is much more red now..
Thanks guys for your help
 

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Orange silicon gasket is the original factory gasket. After market kits have a rubber/cork gasket. The pan will take a good amount of gentle levering with a large screw driver to break the original sealing silicone. It's also hard to clean off the pan after, I used a drill with a fine wire wheel to get it off. At least you changed the oil, still recommend you try and get the filter out next service, yes it's fiddly, specially the bolts almost hidden above the chassis rail on the left hand side of the pan, but with a bit of care it's doable by anyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Ray G
I' ll try to jack the car higher next time to get a better access to pry the oil pan.
I got 2 rubber gasket with my oil filter that i bought, was it a mistake they made or do i have to put the 2 rubber gasket to the oil pan without silicone?
 

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You may have bought a 'universal filter kit' that fits more than one model transmission. The one I bought from National Pronto Association, Grapevine Texas thru Ebay for my '07 is a Pronto F-219. Supposedly equivalent to a Purolator P-1297 or a Fram FT1225 or a Hasting TF-190. It only came with one gasket which was the exact fit for mine. In Adelaide, Australia where I live the dealers deny there is even a gasket or filter in the transmission! They will gladly sell you a tube of the orange silicon for around A$100 (It's very special stuff yaknow) but look at you like you are an idiot if you ask for the filter kit.
 

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I got 2 rubber gasket with my oil filter that i bought, was it a mistake they made or do i have to put the 2 rubber gasket to the oil pan without silicone?
sometimes you do get extra parts. best solution is take a good look at your old filter when you take it out. you'll know pretty quick how many gaskets are needed.

do note that stacking up 2 gaskets is a big no-no. it WILL leak. many engines have been killed by stupid kids doing oil changes who don't look for the old gasket when they remove the filter. sometimes it detaches from the old one on removal. new filter goes in with 2 gaskets if it gets stuck on the flange....oil leaks, bang.
 
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