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This post is directed at Australian vehicle owners who may have an interest in our current and proposed fuel regulations and the effect of Euro 6 requirements.

The federal government has received final submissions on petrol quality and Euro 6 vehicle regulations in June of this year with the view of ensuring Australia complies with its international commitments. The information can be viewed on the government infrastructure web site or simply do a Google search on Australian fuel standards.

All modern vehicles will adapt to various octane fuels, some may give improvements and some may not. Knock sensors on the engines sense knocking/pinging and prevent engine damage. Vehicles are not tuned to only operate on 91 RON, in fact owners hand books state that 91 RON is simply the minimum RON that can be used and due to Australia fuel regulations the 91 RON petrol in your vehicle may be slightly above 91.

The main area of concern is the high sulphur content of our petrol, 91 has 150 parts per million and 95/98 has 50 parts per million. The current world standard is 10 parts per million. Sulphur is a major pollution agent and can also effect the operation of the sensors that supply information to the vehicle computers. My personal view is that 91 RON will be phased out.

It should be noted that direct injection petrol vehicles while lowering co2 create more dangerous pollution in the form of oxides, so much so that VW and Mercedes will start to fit particle filters to their direct injection petrol vehicles. The high sulphur content of 91 petrol may increase the level of pollution when used in direct injection vehicles.

If Australia does adopt Euro 6 our petrol costs will increase but may be offset by increased performance and improved fuel economy, as manufactures will not have to modify vehicles for the Australian market. Mazda appear to run a lower compression ratio for Australia due to our preference for 91 RON. Perhaps it is time for Australia to move on and gain the benefits of new technology through the use of higher quality petrol. What do Australian forum readers think?
 

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I think that whatever happens, happens. And us plebs will have no say in it.

We are behind the world when it comes to electric cars.

As much as I am a fan of the internal combustion engine, there days are numbered.

I'm guessing in 10 years, a large %age of cars will be electric, so the lifespan of the petrol/diesel car is limited.

All IMO
 

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Interesting statements. May I ask how a particle filter will trap oxides of nitrogen gas not a particulate? The only way known is the past is to lower peak combustion temperature with the use of an EGR system, retarded timing, and the use of a 3 way cat (plus engine modifications). Do you have any faith in what VW may do?
 

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Yes I agree the future will be electric but hopefully there will be some performance vehicles around for people that can afford the running costs. European cities have imposed limits on the use of internal combustion vehicles and the rest of the world will follow. We live in interesting times.
 

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Below is information from Automotive News Europe

HANOVER, Germany -- Volkswagen Group plans to fit particle filters, used in its diesel cars, in its turbocharged gasoline direct-injection engines starting mid-2017 to help meet future tailpipe emission targets.
Direct-injection technology displacing older gasoline port-injection engines, due to its superior fuel efficiency. However gasoline direct-injection engines have the disadvantage that there is less time for the gasoline to mix with the air in the combustion chamber. This incomplete mixing leads to a substantially higher output of toxic particulate matter.
Starting in September 2017, all new type-approved gasoline-powered vehicles in the EU will have to reduce their particulate matter levels to a tenth of the previous amount under the upcoming Euro 6c regulation.
VW Group CEO Matthias Mueller said the automaker's new TSI and TSFI engines will be successively equipped with a gasoline particulate filter.
Mueller said Volkswagen will start next June with the 1.4-liter TSI engine in the new VW Tiguan compact SUV and the 2.0-liter TFSI engine in the Audi A5 in order to reduce PM emissions by up to 90 percent.
Up to 7 million VW Group vehicles could be equipped with this technology each year by 2022, he told shareholders at the automaker's annual meeting here on June 22.
This means Volkswagen will join Mercedes-Benz brand, which already announced it would gradually roll out filters through its gasoline engine fleet in the future.
Since 2014, Faurecia has been supplying the Mercedes S 500 with gasoline particle filters, which uses a different material as a substrate compared to their diesel particle filters. Last April, Faurecia said it would make the technology available across the industry for all types of vehicles.
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Well I suppose they have done a lot of testing to make the decision to go ahead fitting them. No manufacturer has fitted microwave units to the exhaust which has been proven to almost eliminate exhaust emissions. Electric is definitely the future. How we generate the electricity is another thing. Fuel cell technology seems to have been shelved at the moment with plug in cars all the go. The Tesla electric truck has shown to be a furfy for Australia anyway. The long haul trips between Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane don't make it practical plus the greatly reduced payload due to the battery weight but I am sure that will change. E85 is very slow on the uptake here but I put that down to cost. It's not cheap enough to keep money in your pocket and the hidden environmental cost of production is another thing. So bring on the electric cars.
 
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