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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a torn boot on the passenger CV Axel.
A while ago my drivers side (left) went and I found buying a pair of axels from Carid was a good deal. Replacing the drivers side was easy and the same as all other FWD cars Ive replaced the CV axel. Held into the transmission side y a small snap type ring at the end of the axel. A slide hammer or pry bar pops it out.

On my LF 2017 Sport 2.0T ( and I think it is the same for the Limited 2.0T) the passenger side the CV axel inner does not go into the transmission. Hyundai used a short "half shaft" out of the transmission to a support and bearing and then the CV connects to the "output half shaft. The CV Axel inner is a female the output shaft on the car is a male.

Does it just pop off the output half shaft? Use a puller or pry and it will pop out like the other side? Or does it connect at the outer bearing support for the output shaft?

Before I get it apart and find out I need a different tool Id like to confirm that I just give it a pop and it will come out. I want to do it after work this week and cant afford to not get the car back together same day. The drivers side was breeze did not even take off the calipers or strut. Just axel nut and lower spindle clamp and was able to pull it out of the way and reach in with a slide hammer and pop the axel out of the trans.

see diagram below #1 & 5

Thanks for any help.

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It will pop off however depending on how corroded things are that's where it can get challenging and in the worst case be seized on. Unlike the transmission ends that sit inside a nice seal and usually trans fluid.

Typical example, splined with c clip

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That thing can be **** to remove. As stated above it all depends how corroded it is. First time I did mines it was it wasn't fun, I ended up removing the entire shaft and taking it to a shop where they had a press and removed it for me.
 

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When that boot went while I was on vacation in Florida, had a shop change the axle, took him 45 minutes. When I did the daughters' Maxima, couldn't get the shaft to seperate from the intermediate bearing until I applied heat, then it came off easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Guys

It went home yesterday and tried to do it . 30 minutes to get to the point of pulling the axel and I spent 1.5+ hr trying to get it off with a 5lb slide puller and trying to get under and pry or get an angle on it to use a hammer.
No luck never moved. I was running out of time so put it back together and will try again.

At least I know it does just pop off with the clip.

Thank for the replies and picture.
 

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If you have not, try and get some penetrant in and maybe a plan B in case things go bad and the bearing gets damaged. Are used assemblies available that may be in better condition or low mileage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Got it done yesterday.
30 minutes or less to get to the point of pulling the axel - the easy part.

Spent over 2 hours under the car beating on the CV to get the axel out. It probably would have gone easier if I had the car on a lift so I could get a better swing with the hammer. But I ended up jacking it up as high as my jack stands would allow to give more room. The first hour I tried some heat and a small sledge (single jack is what we used to call them) and a 12" solid 1/2" round bar for my drift punch also tried my air hammer. It did not move.

There is a metal dust seal on the end of the axel shaft the I think is there to protect the carrier bearing on the output half shaft. With it there you cant see the connection point of the 2 shafts to be able to spray any penetrating oil . So I finally drilled 4 1/8" holes through the cover piece (looks like a washer on the end of splined end of the axel) and then shot JB Blaster into all 4 holes . Immediately I had a lot of rust drip out. I continued to spray it a couple more times and then went back at it with the hammer and punch from under the car through the opening you get when you remove the center panel to do oil and filter.

It started to move, I sprayed it 2 more times and waited 10-15 minutes and 2 more blows with the hammer (I always kept turning it between each hammer blow) it let loose and popped off. The splines and the clip had a lot of rust on them.

Cleaned it up, spun and checked the output shaft and carrier bearing and it seemed fine. I used a lot of Peratex Anti Seize on the splines and put it together.

If I had not been sure that it was not a press fit thanks to your replies above I would have taken it into a shop and paid them.

If I ever have to do it again, If it doesnt move with a couple blows with the hammer or slide hammer, Id drill it and spray every day for a few days and then go at it.

What should have been a 1 hour job took 2 days and about 4 hr of just trying to get the axel off the splined shaft.

Thanks guys for your responses above.

Taking it into the dealer today to have the trunk latch recall done. My trunk latch stopped working about a month ago, this was the first appointment I could get at dealer.
 

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Yeah there was a lot of rust colored drip.

I sprayed a ton of PB Blaster in all four holes. Wait 15mins. Another round of blasting. Another 15mins. Then 5 whacks of the slide hammer and it was out.

I wish I read this earlier…. Would have saved me a smashed thumb and a big blister on my hand. lol
 

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the pictures don't help, but I am not doing it.
I have to ask though, when you had the other axle out, could you have punched it out from the other side?
I remember doing that once on a sentra. got a long bar that fit all the way through and hammered that till it pushed the other side out of the trans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
the pictures don't help, but I am not doing it.
I have to ask though, when you had the other axle out, could you have punched it out from the other side?
I remember doing that once on a sentra. got a long bar that fit all the way through and hammered that till it pushed the other side out of the trans.
No that wont work because there is a "half shaft and carrier bearing" that goes into the transmission (see post #1 & 2 above). Then the CV axel slides over the "half shaft" this is why it gets stuck it is not inside the transmission so there is no lubrication.
 

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so that thing on the right hand side has the shaft stuck in it?
again, just asking.
if that is still in the trans and bolted in, I undestand it isn't stuck in the trans, but it seems like you could still push it out instead of slide hammering it out. but I see the part stuck now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you want to take out the CV axel and the half shaft. You have to unbolt the bracket that holds the half shaft and carrier bearing to the engine and then you could pull bot pieces of the axel out (post picture #1) . The half shaft should easily pop out just like the drivers side does since it is in the trans and is lubricated.

Then separate them on the bench. But getting the carrier bracket off looks like a couple of the bolts are difficult to get to doing it on jack stands.

I found and it sounds like TwoPointShow found that if you can get a little penetrating oil on the splines it lets loose and isnt hard to get off.
 

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Thanks. hopefully it will be a while for me, but good know the tricks.
You should not have to go through all that effort on your Limited 2.4.
Only the turbo cars have the half shaft. The half shaft and engine-mounted carrier bearing makes the left and right axles basically the same length. Designed to limit 'torque steer' caused by uneven-length axles in hi-performance applications.
 
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