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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It may be too early to be asking this question of the 2021 2.5 turbo group here because these vehicles are so new but was wondering if anyone with the turbo engine has started experiencing gas fumes or higher than normal oil levels (oil be diluted with gas) on their dipsticks. I noticed that on the Outback forum more turbo equipped Outback and Ascent owners (they share the same engine) are starting to complain about gas fumes and oil dilutions without any solid help from the dealer. Also seems that at least with the Outbacks these direct injection engines start exhibiting the problem somewhere beyond the 4k mile mark. I'm still deliberating between choosing the Limited Santa Fe with the turbo vs the Outback with it's turbo so interested if anyone here that might be having a problem.
 

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It is an issue on my Gen Coupe 2L Turbo. But 5K oil change oil analysis said the oil was still good at that time while noting the dilution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think it's too early to ask. And with a 10yr/100k mile warranty, who cares. :unsure:
Why?, because even with the 10yr/100k mile warranty they can claim your gas fumes and high dipstick level are all normal and operating as designed. The Honda 1.5 turbo oil dilution debacle took 3 years for Honda to admit its a problem and now Subaru dealerships are saying they can't recreate the problem and that it may be within spec.
 

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Why?, because even with the 10yr/100k mile warranty they can claim your gas fumes and high dipstick level are all normal and operating as designed. The Honda 1.5 turbo oil dilution debacle took 3 years for Honda to admit its a problem and now Subaru dealerships are saying they can't recreate the problem and that it may be within spec.
But again, so what? If you have brought the problem to their attention, they say it's normal, and then the engine fails, they will have a hard time denying the warranty claim.

I will say that after about 3,000 miles on a '21 Limited, my wife has not complained of smelling fuel vapors and I haven't seen the oil level rise on the dipstick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But again, so what? If you have brought the problem to their attention, they say it's normal, and then the engine fails, they will have a hard time denying the warranty claim.

I will say that after about 3,000 miles on a '21 Limited, my wife has not complained of smelling fuel vapors and I haven't seen the oil level rise on the dipstick.
Hey, thanks for chiming in. It's really a good sign that no one has complained about this problem on this forum so keeping fingers crossed they got that designed correctly. I certainly realize that if the engine failed Hyundai would be on the hook to replace the engine etc and that's great but that could be 75k miles down the road before complete failure occurs and in the meantime I'd rather not be having the vehicle in and out of the dealership waiting on a fix or having them drain 2 quarts of diluted oil and have me running back for oil changes every 3k miles etc. Just wanting to avoid that hassle. Again, I'm glad we've not seen these complaints so far here and that goes a long way towards building my confidence.
 

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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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Best to get a Used Oil Analysis done. I have gotten three done thus far on my 2020 2.0T that has oil dilution. With GDI turbo engines, a little is to be expected, but it shouldn't be too excessive.
 

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"too early"??? Absolutely not. Dilution happens immediately (measurable from dip stick in a week) and stabilizes afterward (idk why)!
 

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I think it's more a GDI thing than a turbo thing.
In my non-turbo Tucson the oil rises about 1/8" after a few hundred miles then stabilizes.
Mostly short trips, but if I go on the highway and drive 100 miles the level does not drop back down.
I just use 5w-30 instead of 5w-20 to help make up.
 

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I think it's too early to ask. And with a 10yr/100k mile warranty, who cares. :unsure:
You might care if you are on a road trip 2000+ miles from home and your bearings seize, due to severely diluted 5w-30 oil.
Worse - - having this at the start of your vacation that you paid $10,000 for.

Yes we have a warranty - - but if you travel with your family this dilution can cause issues down the road.

If I was to do it over I would buy a v6 SF or SUV over the Direct Injected turbo's that are filling up the marketplace.

You can also just change the oil every 4 months instead of 6 - - or change it out at 3k instead of 6k.
 

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But again, so what? If you have brought the problem to their attention, they say it's normal, and then the engine fails, they will have a hard time denying the warranty claim.

I will say that after about 3,000 miles on a '21 Limited, my wife has not complained of smelling fuel vapors and I haven't seen the oil level rise on the dipstick.
You never intend to take a road trip with your DI turbo - gas pumping - suv?
Road trip - engine failure, engine issues are not cool.
Especially if you have taken it to your dealer for help.

Glad you don't notice an issue but many of us 2.0t users are reporting the opposite even in hot summer weather.

My next oil change - next week will definitely be with 5w-40.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think it's more a GDI thing than a turbo thing.
In my non-turbo Tucson the oil rises about 1/8" after a few hundred miles then stabilizes.
Mostly short trips, but if I go on the highway and drive 100 miles the level does not drop back down.
I just use 5w-30 instead of 5w-20 to help make up.
Yes, It's absolutely a characteristic, more than likely unintended one of GDI engines but it's the turbo versions, eg, Honda, Subaru, Ford as opposed to the non-turbo ones which are seeing the more serious consequences of oil dilution. For these people, their is no stabilization as the gas just keeps leaking around the piston rings and never fully burns up and creeps up the dipstick either because the engine never gets hot enough or for other reasons. To have someone like Honda tell it's CRV owners to avoid short trips is pure BS as there are plenty of people who simply do not have longer commutes to work or only use their vehicles for local trips.
It's also possible that it occurs from day one but I would guess that most people don't notice it until 4 or 5k miles simply because they aren't inclined to be always checking the oil level.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.4 L
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IMO
All GDI turbo motors have oil dilution. The problem is most owners don't monitor the oil level. So the owners that bring this to the dealers attention get blown off. Or the manufacturer ignores you .
I say again, had an oil dilution problem with our 19 CRV 1.5 turbo. Less than 10 K miles on it. I had a lab test that showed over 5% oil dilution in 3 K miles. Took it to dealer where we purchased it. Dealt with the service manager. Was told noting is wrong. The service manager avoided me when I picked the car up.
 

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It may be too early to be asking this question of the 2021 2.5 turbo group here because these vehicles are so new but was wondering if anyone with the turbo engine has started experiencing gas fumes or higher than normal oil levels (oil be diluted with gas) on their dipsticks. I noticed that on the Outback forum more turbo equipped Outback and Ascent owners (they share the same engine) are starting to complain about gas fumes and oil dilutions without any solid help from the dealer. Also seems that at least with the Outbacks these direct injection engines start exhibiting the problem somewhere beyond the 4k mile mark. I'm still deliberating between choosing the Limited Santa Fe with the turbo vs the Outback with it's turbo so interested if anyone here that might be having a problem.
The new 2.5 engines are MPI and GDI.

I can’t remember whereIntead it, but it’s supposedly MPI until the engine reaches a certain temperature, and then it switches to using the GDI injectors.

This is to prevent gas dilution of the oil from the GDI injectors during cold or low-mileage use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The new 2.5 engines are MPI and GDI.

I can’t remember whereIntead it, but it’s supposedly MPI until the engine reaches a certain temperature, and then it switches to using the GDI injectors.

This is to prevent gas dilution of the oil from the GDI injectors during cold or low-mileage use.
Hmm, I think you may be right about this. I was able to find what I think you might have read which explains some of this. They list the engines that use dual fuel injection technology (MPI and GDI) as:
Models with Dual Fuel Injection: Smartstream G2.5 GDi / T-GDi
I assume that the G2.5 engines, both turbo and non turbo use both methods. Seems very reasonable to deduce that achieving higher engine temps quickly by employing MPI at low speeds and then switching to GDI at highway speeds should theoretically minimize oil dilution. The article that I found is:
 

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You never intend to take a road trip with your DI turbo - gas pumping - suv?
Road trip - engine failure, engine issues are not cool.
Especially if you have taken it to your dealer for help.

Glad you don't notice an issue but many of us 2.0t users are reporting the opposite even in hot summer weather.

My next oil change - next week will definitely be with 5w-40.
We are on our 3rd Santa Fe-family crossover. We had a 2014 SFS 2.0T and a 2018 SFS 2.0T Ultimate prior to getting the 2021 SF Limited 2.5T. To the best of my knowledge we never experienced oil dilution with either of the 2.0T examples, although I did not have oil analysis done on them. Furthest either of them ever went on a single trip was about 600 miles each way; if we go much further than that we will typically fly. I would hesitate to use oil significantly heavier than specified as my understanding is that this can cause issues with variable valve timing systems.
 

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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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Hmm, I think you may be right about this. I was able to find what I think you might have read which explains some of this. They list the engines that use dual fuel injection technology (MPI and GDI) as:
Models with Dual Fuel Injection: Smartstream G2.5 GDi / T-GDi
I assume that the G2.5 engines, both turbo and non turbo use both methods. Seems very reasonable to deduce that achieving higher engine temps quickly by employing MPI at low speeds and then switching to GDI at highway speeds should theoretically minimize oil dilution. The article that I found is:
Nice find!
Some nice technology built into the new engines...
Though I still am interested to see the results of a UOA to see if the technology has good real-world results.
 

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I have owned 10 Hyundais since 2004 and NEVER had a warranty problem. 5 of these were GDI engines. I really take great care with these cars and never had Oil dilution problems except in 2017 when I purchased a Honda CRV.
WHAT A BIG MISTAKE if you didn't monitor oil level it would add 1 quart of gas every 1500 miles Honda was terrible to deal with so I got rid of it at a loss. Purchased a 2019 Santa Fe Ultimate and It runs great and NO OIL PROBLEMS.
I just sold 2019 for a 2021 Santa Fe Calligraphy and I can't believe how great this car is.
 

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We are on our 3rd Santa Fe-family crossover. We had a 2014 SFS 2.0T and a 2018 SFS 2.0T Ultimate prior to getting the 2021 SF Limited 2.5T. To the best of my knowledge we never experienced oil dilution with either of the 2.0T examples, although I did not have oil analysis done on them. Furthest either of them ever went on a single trip was about 600 miles each way; if we go much further than that we will typically fly. I would hesitate to use oil significantly heavier than specified as my understanding is that this can cause issues with variable valve timing systems.
That’s why you get an oil analysis done.

If gasoline is entering the crankcase and causing the effective viscosity of the oil the decrease, you risk improper lubrication of necessary components, which increases wear, and can lead to engine failure.

If you get an oil analysis is done and it shows excessive oil dilution, you have two options:
1. Increase the frequency of your oil changes
2. Use a heavier weight oil so that over time, it’s diluted down to be proper viscosity.

This is even more important in high heat(i.e. turbo applications), as the heat can further break down the oil, making it behave even thinner.
 

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We are on our 3rd Santa Fe-family crossover. We had a 2014 SFS 2.0T and a 2018 SFS 2.0T Ultimate prior to getting the 2021 SF Limited 2.5T. To the best of my knowledge we never experienced oil dilution with either of the 2.0T examples, although I did not have oil analysis done on them. Furthest either of them ever went on a single trip was about 600 miles each way; if we go much further than that we will typically fly. I would hesitate to use oil significantly heavier than specified as my understanding is that this can cause issues with variable valve timing systems.
The 2.0t can use up to a 20w-50 weight oil. According to the manual.
5w-40 has been utilized by 2.0t engines in Germany for decades.
 
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