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Discussion Starter #1
:frown:Hi All
My wife's I10 is 4 years old now and I was thinking about flushing the cooling
system out.Any thoughts about the best antifreeze to use .
 

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I use Comma Xstream G48 Antifreeze & Coolant Concentrate. You can pick up 5L for approx £25. I also use deionised water, but that's just me being really picky.
 

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I have never bothered with changing the coolant but do check the strength of the anti freeze every year after the warranty expires, I had my last i10 serviced at a Hyundai dealer for the first 5 years and I am sure they never changed it in that time. On older cars I have ended up changing it due to some problem such as needing to replace the thermostat water pump or anything that needs the system to be drained. I would never put the old coolant back in, its difficult to collect even if you wanted to.
 

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Additives in the coolant wear out. You have to be careful about the pH as if it goes below 9 the electrolysis starts happening. A digital voltmeter with one lead on the engine block and the other stuck in the coolant in the radiator will tell the tale.

Any voltage higher than .4VDC and you need to change the coolant.

Begin with a cold engine. Remove the radiator cap and start the engine. Set your digital multimeter to DC volts at 20 volts or less. When the engine reaches operating temperature, insert the positive probe directly into the coolant. Rev the engine to 2,000 rpm and place the negative probe on the negative battery terminal. If the digital meter reads .4 volts or less, your coolant is in good condition. If it’s greater than .4 volts, the electrolysis additives are exhausted, and you may be in the market for a new radiator, a water pump or a heater core in the future. All of those are far more expensive than a simple coolant change.
 

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Additives in the coolant wear out. You have to be careful about the pH as if it goes below 9 the electrolysis starts happening. A digital voltmeter with one lead on the engine block and the other stuck in the coolant in the radiator will tell the tale.

Any voltage higher than .4VDC and you need to change the coolant.
Interested to know what the effect "electrolysis" would have? I have never heard of it other than in the battery.
 

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Don't flush.

Drain/refill the radiator and overflow bottle.

Use whatever longer life Asian coolant equivalent is available in your area. There are no bests.

If someone doesn't know what coolant/antifreeze electrolysis is, then look it up. Use google and read. For those that don't know what electrolysis is, you change the coolant to prevent corrosion/rust/dissolution of the system. I prefer to keep my waterpump, radiator, and heatercore leak free as long as possible. Timely antifreeze-coolant replacement is cheaper than their replacements.

There will always be fools that never bother doing anything and wait for failure. That is fine for some but not me.

Either buy 50:50 premixed, or use full strength mixed with distilled/deionized water. Never use tap or well water.
 

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Have you considered water-less antifreeze??
The antifreeze never gets hot enough to build pressure
So your cooling system is never stressed in that manner
And it will last much longer


 

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I read online that Hyundai say change coolant after 60,000 miles and then 30,000 miles thereafter.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the replies.With regard to the waterless coolant the cost at over £100 is not justified .I think I will stick to normal antifreeze.
 
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