Hyundai Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

I have read quite a few so called "expert" reviews about this AMT box

One of the worst ( assume the i10 and picanto a very similar cars and share the same AMT) from here Hyundai i10 (2020) review: diminishing returns

"What about that AMT?
If you value your sanity, do not buy the AMT. Standing for automated manual transmission, we truly thought this type of gearbox was on its way out. This gearbox alone would be sufficient to take the i10 from a four-star car to a one-star car.

It’s laughably slow and jerky to shift, up or down. It’s possible to smooth things out a little by lifting off slightly, but it’s so unpredictable that it’s very difficult to modulate this. You can take manual control if you wish – via the shifter, not paddles – but that doesn’t speed matters up."

How do people find it in the real world??, reason i ask, i have an auto licence only, and no dealers near me have any autos in stock to try.

I see on the picantio you can only have the AMT with a 1.0 with 66bhp
Where as the I10 you can get 1.0l with 66 bhp or 1.2l with 84bhp

I do mainly town and village driving 70%, and A roads 25%, and motorway 5%

Any input on the above engines would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Apparently (?) the current KIA Picanto shares the same AMT with the current i10.

There are some (limited and short), first hand reviews on the current KIA Picanto with the AMT on a german forum, just in case you can either read german or have it translated into meaningful english:
www.motor-talk.de/forum/kia-picanto-mit-amt-empfehlenswert-t6936402.html

If not, here's the summary of the posts with first hand experience:

One user claimed to have extensively test driven an automatic Picanto prior to September 3rd, 2020 and compared it to Skoda, VW, Opel and Ford "with a similar transmission". S/he found it to be agile, with "quick responses" and gear change behaviour controllable (i.e. suscetible) via the accelerator pedal. Gear changes in the other cars were slower and less agile, with the VW and Skoda cars especially having a noticeable lag when changing gears. However, the user did not respond to the question whether s/he did indeed try the AMT version on the current model or the torque converter in the previous one. Judging by the date of the post, the comparison with the other cars (not named in more detail but the VW Up and clones came with an AMT) as well as my own experience with the torque converter in the second generation i10, the latter (i.e. that the user test drove an earlier Picanto with a torque converter) is more likely, imho.

Another user posted in December 2021 that s/he had a Picanto with the AMT and had sold it after a short while. Apparently, the car had several faults, a defective radio and would upshift from first to second inconsistently (sometimes at 2000 or 2500 rpm, sometimes at 4000 rpm). KIA had no solution for it, claiming the AMT is adjusting to and learning the driving style (after thousands of miles driven). Other than that, the user liked the mostly early upshift behaviour and found the shift duration (or rather, delay) "bearable".

A third forum user commented on driving the current Hyundai i10 with the AMT by saying that a (quote!) "97 year old novice driver with impaired vision and hearing" would be able to change gears better than the AMT. When asked for more details, s/he wrote that the automated clutch kicks in suddenly and the delay until acceleration sets in again is very long.

FWIW:
After many years driving several (all new) 1st and 2nd generation Smart ForTwos with an AMT and comparing them with torque converters (including the excellent one in the 2nd gen. i10 of my parents), I'd only buy an AMT if I were in your position (i.e. no option to get a manual transmission) AND the car would be driven primarily on long distances with few gear changes in between. And even then I'd worry about reports of AMTs being more susceptible to wear and issues compared to both manual gear boxes and torque converters.

Off-topic:
Is it possible to "upgrade" the auto-only driver's permit to also incluce manual gear boxes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,880 Posts
It’s laughably slow and jerky to shift, up or down. It’s possible to smooth things out a little by lifting off slightly, but it’s so unpredictable that it’s very difficult to modulate this.
It's a concept best left to the exotic sports cars, not every day grocery getters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi myself321,
I think I'm too late for this discussion but still would like to give my opinion. My family recently took delivery of the i10's top variant ( 1.2 l kappa vtvt MT) a few months ago. We are super happy with kind of ride quality it gives and ofcourse the mileage not to say the least.

We test drove the AMT version but ofcourse the lag until the car reached a higher rpm. We were quick to dismiss it.

But I do have a suggestion for you if you are so insistent upon amt. I would suggest you go for Hyundai Venue IMT. IMT is just the same as a manual transmission but it does not have a clutch. That's it !! It is best of the both worlds .. isn't it ? Hyundai Venue is the first car in India to come with IMT and ofcourse it is super popular. Let me know what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
But I do have a suggestion for you if you are so insistent upon amt. I would suggest you go for Hyundai Venue IMT. IMT is just the same as a manual transmission but it does not have a clutch.
myself321 seems to be from the UK, where the Hyundai Venue is not on sale.

What's more: the "IMT" transmission in the Venue is an AMT and it does have a clutch, just as all AMTs do. What it does not have is a clutch-pedal (again, just like every AMT). The difference to usual AMT's is that the IMT does not select when to change gears by itself but waits for the driver to indicate that s/he wishes to go up or down one gear. This is neither "smarter" than standard AMTs (actually, it is "dumber" since it lets the driver take the decision when to change gears), nor new (the Smart ForTwo for example had it from the very beginning, almost a quarter of a century ago).
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top