Hyundai Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I approach 15,000 miles on my 2017 Elantra Value Edition, I want to replace both the air filter and the cabin air filter. Is OEM the best bet, or are there aftermarket brands that are better quality, or all the same?


Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
For me I will use OEM air filter. I had a bad experience with Wix air filter in another car. Had a 1" hole in it after 3k miles. Ran Fram after that with no problem, but there is hardly any price difference between that and OEM for the Hyundai. My philosopy is when in doubt use OEM. I think it will ensure the best fit. Aftermarket can be a little off in that regard.

I went with TYC from Rock Auto for Cabin filter. It is OK. Flows well, but do not like it has two hard sides then the accordian type filter material will have to seal. It is not as criticial so will may use another aftermarket one next time around.

http://www.hyundai-forums.com/ad-2017-elantra/614369-tyc-cabin-filter-review.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
For me I will use OEM air filter. I had a bad experience with Wix air filter in another car. Had a 1" hole in it after 3k miles. Ran Fram after that with no problem, but there is hardly any price difference between that and OEM for the Hyundai. My philosopy is when in doubt use OEM. I think it will ensure the best fit. Aftermarket can be a little off in that regard.

I went with TYC from Rock Auto for Cabin filter. It is OK. Flows well, but do not like it has two hard sides then the accordian type filter material will have to seal. It is not as criticial so will may use another aftermarket one next time around.

http://www.hyundai-forums.com/ad-2017-elantra/614369-tyc-cabin-filter-review.html
I like your 'when in doubt go OEM' philosophy. If there's any issues, let the dealership worry about it. i like K&N dry filters for my engine, but make sure they are dry filters as there are many horror stories of MAF sensors n'at getting boogered up with the wet filters.

In a worst case scenario, if that cabin filter comes apart and clogs up your blower motor, it could potentially cause a heafty repair bill. Also, if you plan on keeping your car, good air flow through the cabin filter = less stress on the blower motor = a happier blower motor = a happier owner (there's a 'That's what she said joke' in there).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Me, I use K&N air filters. Have for decades and I've never had an issue. I just had to clean the Elantra filter. It was loaded and I had to use a vacuum and compressed air to clean out the crap. So it did stop something. The biggest issue with K&N is they last forever, but they take time. Buy a new filter, tear open the box, undo the clips. pull out the old one, insert new, secure clips, done. The maintenance on a K&N can take hours because when you re-oil, you must let the oil spread out thoroughly and set up before you put the winds of a hurricane through it. That takes a couple of hours. The vacuuming, etc can take minutes or much longer depending on the debris. When the mice built a nest in the air box on my RX-7, it took an hour. Biggest problem is over-oiling. That's why you go lightly and let it spread out. So, other than that, I like the performance increase (likely placebo effect) and some of the maintenance time is offset by not having to sit at the computer or run to the dealer.

I like Fram Fresh Breeze cabin filters. I'm also using OEM. As stated, price is a toss-up, but I think the Fram is better made compared to the OEM. But I see Rock Auto is sold out of Fram cabin filters. Must be something else going on.

You should check your air filter more often. My Elantra needed cleaning with only 9K miles. Our Sonata goes past 15K and never gets as dirty. So learn the car and develop your own change schedule. Both filters are very easy to replace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,807 Posts
Why are you replacing the engine air filter at 15,000. It is so easy to take out and look at I would first see how dirty it is. As you know, the manual says 30,000 so I would inspect it first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,646 Posts
Why are you replacing the engine air filter at 15,000. It is so easy to take out and look at I would first see how dirty it is. As you know, the manual says 30,000 so I would inspect it first.
I check mine ever 6k miles and replace if necessary. Buy them on eBay (oem) for $14.00.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Why are you replacing the engine air filter at 15,000. It is so easy to take out and look at I would first see how dirty it is. As you know, the manual says 30,000 so I would inspect it first.
And if you're taking it out anyway, run a shop vac across it while you have it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Unless you drive on a dirt road everyday, just replace your engine filter at the recommended interval. Visually checking a filter does nothing for you, the crap that clogs a filter isn't visible to the human eye. Additionally, the stuff that is large and visible won't actually clog up your filter and you can always vacuum it away.

Dorky note: whenever I plug in my OBD 2 reader, my dashcommand app tells me what my manifold pressure is at. Theoretically, you could tell when your filter needs replacing if at WOT your MAP sensor wasn't reading as close to ambient pressure as it used to....

As for what filters I use, I use OEM for the engine, and ATP activated carbon for the cabin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
Unless you drive on a dirt road everyday, just replace your engine filter at the recommended interval. Visually checking a filter does nothing for you, the crap that clogs a filter isn't visible to the human eye. Additionally, the stuff that is large and visible won't actually clog up your filter and you can always vacuum it away.
Then this one on my car doesn't need changing?

[/IMG]

:grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,837 Posts
At 15K miles, only found two dead flies in my air clean, made sure they had a proper burial. Bit of fuzz, used a clevis tool on my vacuum cleaner to make it look like new again and stuck it back in.


OEM does not have a carbon cabin filter but can find aftermarkets filters that have this feature.


For years, been telling us to check the exhaust system for leaks, can get CO poisoning, but they don't mention all the other exhaust systems in front, back, on your sides, and even above and below you. Have the nevre to call that grille under the windshield the fresh air intake.



EPA loves to pick on a 1.4L engine, but commercial vehicles pouring out black smoke are let go as are military vehicles, airlines, and NASA. Several airports have over 1,000 planes landing and taking off in a day, take off at 100% power and land at 95% pouring tons of pollutants in the air, but you don't dare light up a tiny little cigarette, and can be shot for doing so.



Ha, with most heating systems pouring out 20-50% of heat into the air, picked on a little pilot light, by getting rid of this, also need electricity for your furnace or range to work. And with the vast majority of electrical lines using over 100 year old technology, hanging a wire on a wooden pole, power failures are very common.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Then this one on my car doesn't need changing?

[/IMG]

:grin2:
A) That one appears to be over it's recommended service interval, so yes it should be changed! I've seen pictures of filters like that after like 80-100K miles.
B) there are a lot of larger particles on there. Larger particles won't block airflow in a filter, and they can be vacuumed off. Small particles are what block airfilters, and the small particles ability to block an air filter is what you cant see with your eye. That was my point earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
I was always taught that it was a good idea to hold the filter up to the sun--that's the best way to see how clogged it is. Of course, this only works if you have a new one for comparison anyway, so probably a good idea to just replace at the recommended interval as @CyprusCorner stated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I was always taught that it was a good idea to hold the filter up to the sun--that's the best way to see how clogged it is. Of course, this only works if you have a new one for comparison anyway, so probably a good idea to just replace at the recommended interval as @CyprusCorner stated.
I just change mine every four months. The filters are very inexpensive. I just change it every four months and I dont need to worry about. But even after four months you can see where the filter has caught a bunch of stuff. This has always been the case with my cabin air filters. I changed mine every six months with my 2007 Elantra. But with my 2018 Elantra I switched to a four month schedule. At only $7 or $8 a filter it's a minimal cost.

Sent from my Galaxy S8 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Ha! Looks like mine I just changed minus the leaves. Mine had 34K on it. WAY too long to go without changing it. Ordered the carbon $8.95 from Ebay and fit like a glove. Changing it took all of 30 seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Ha! Looks like mine I just changed minus the leaves. Mine had 34K on it. WAY too long to go without changing it. Ordered the carbon $8.95 from Ebay and fit like a glove. Changing it took all of 30 seconds.
you mentioned carbon--I think you are referring to the cabin air filter. I think the thread was mostly referring to the engine air cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
I just change mine every four months. The filters are very inexpensive...
Yes they are inexpensive, but changing it every four months is still wasting your money, unless you are driving 30,000 miles in four months.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top