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I've been doing a lot of research and I have narrowed it down to getting a PHEV HSH.

I currently own a 2012 HSH. The question I have (that doesnt seem to have a direct, straight answer online that I could find) is when the 43km range on the PHEV runs out, does it just run on straight gas after that or does it drive identical to my current 2012 HSH with the engine and regenerative braking powering the battery up to run every couple minutes.
Sorry if these have been answered here or if they are silly questions.
 

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I've been doing a lot of research and I have narrowed it down to getting a PHEV HSH.

I currently own a 2012 HSH. The question I have (that doesnt seem to have a direct, straight answer online that I could find) is when the 43km range on the PHEV runs out, does it just run on straight gas after that or does it drive identical to my current 2012 HSH with the engine and regenerative braking powering the battery up to run every couple minutes.
Sorry if these have been answered here or if they are silly questions.
Be aware that the Sonata PHEV does not have a PTC electric heater. So if you are using this vehicle in an area with medium to very cold winters, the car will need to turn the gas engine on to provide heat to the interior of the vehicle. This will use plenty of gas just to heat interior of the car.

I feel this is a major design flaw in the vehicle and recommend folks not buy the PHEV version unless you live in Southern California.

Secondly, the number of PHEVs sold has been very small. So it may turn out that parts will become hard to get at some point.

Thirdly, there is no capacity warranty on the traction battery. Since the PHEV uses the traction battery much harder then the HEV model, loss of capacity could become an issue a few years out. As it stands now, the traction battery would have to have a dead cell for warranty to be any good.

Anyhow, it's your money. Just go in with your eyes open.
 

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Actually, thanks for asking that question, BDunn1987. When I was first researching hybrids I could not find the answer to that question either (I found this forum after I purchased). I sort of guessed that was the case because of the very limited range but never really knew.

I have the regular hybrid but I read all posts in this forum. As marshallwa pointed out, the PHEV is not very well supported (almost unsupported it seems) by Hyundai. There are such a small number in the USA that PHEV parts seem to be in very short supply, with some people waiting weeks to months for some parts.

My dealer only had one hybrid tech for quite a while so when I needed service I needed to call in and learn his work schedule. I wold think the number of experienced PHEV techs is even smaller (experienced being the key word). You might want to ask the dealer about the ratio of hybrids to PHEV's they sell. Maybe it's high where you are.

Hybrid technology is changing fast that it feels like the PHEV was Hyundai's answer to the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) requirements because it's not sold in all states. I would be surprised if it is kept in their line-up and not replaced with something else soon, such as the Ioniq (even though it's not quite the same body style). This link seems to show that they are pretty close in size even though the Ioniq is smaller: https://www.cargurus.com/Cars/compare/Hyundai-Sonata-Hybrid-vs-Hyundai-Ioniq_d2107_d2419

Good luck with your decision.
 

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No doubt hybrid tech takes a step function up in every generation.
No doubt Ioniq will be a better P/HEV/EV platform as it was designed with electric powertrain in mind. The Sonata platform is aged, it's HEV/PHEV offshoot is *leveraged* from the petro and mostly initial effort from Hyundai. So the expectations must be tempered, e.g. it is foolish to think the entire HVAC subsystem will be engineer just for a small subset version. Just imagine the cost and stocking, repair, maintenance costs, divided by small number of such vehicle. It would be unrealistic. Besides, one should only benchmark against PHEV/HEV competitors at the time of product-line introduction. To compare a 2016 leveraged design to a new gen 2018 is inappropriate.

But nevertheless, we can compare PHEV specs: Ioniq = I, Sonata = S
1. Size Sonata is a much bigger roomier car offering better comfort, excels at highway speeds.
Length/W/H: I (176/71.7/56.9), S (191/73.4/57.0)
Wt lbm: I (3417), S (3787)
2. Combined petro+EV weight per hp ratio: (lower is better for performance)
I (24.6 lbm/hp), S (18.7 lbm/hp) :surprise: Sonata 32% better.

Sonata trounces Ioniq in quickness while driving in comfort.

I talked with my H dealership (1 of 4 within 50 mile where I live).
There is little difference tech in Sonata PHEV vs HEV, mostly just bigger battery. They service them all the time. I live in California. I am not worried.
I have a 10yr/100K mi powertrain, lifetime battery warranty.
 

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I forgot to mention since buying my 2017 Sonata PHEV, I racked up 8200 mi.
I bought less than 35 gallons of regular gas.
My gasoline mpg is 234 mpg.
Of course I had to charge it everyday. But I have solar.
Total equivalent actual mpg (at $.18/kwh PG&E rate) => 98 MPGe
I almost feel like I bought a 30K $ car at half price. ;-)
Disclosure: I try to charge free whenever I can, e.g. work, library, mall...
 

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I forgot to mention since buying my 2017 Sonata PHEV, I racked up 8200 mi.
I bought less than 35 gallons of regular gas.
My gasoline mpg is 234 mpg.
Of course I had to charge it everyday. But I have solar.
Total equivalent actual mpg (at $.18/kwh PG&E rate) => 98 MPGe
I almost feel like I bought a 30K $ car at half price. ;-)
Disclosure: I try to charge free whenever I can, e.g. work, library, mall...
Do you factor in how much your solar system cost you?
 

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yup, both car and panel break even at less than 6 years.
I used 10Kwh at 6 days per week charge cost.
After that it is equal to a positive revenue stream.
Don't forget, we (USA/CA/PG&E) provide tax incentive of ~7500 for car, 1/3 for solar install.
PG&E sent me a check for $500. I have lower insurance rate for ev.
I have essentially excess solar power if I did not charge.
Live in a sunny climate, have a house with 1200 sq ft of south facing roof in a solar/ev friendly state and drive 20K miles per year, like I do.
Have you checked solar panel cost lately?
 

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This forum is the most EV/Alt Energy ignorant forum I have observed.
If one want to be educated on this topic, check out:
ChevyBolt.org
Go to topics: such as "How To Lower Energy And Operating Costs On EVs"

Learn from people that know what they are talking about.
 

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PHEV runs just like Sonata Hybrid once the battery range is depleted, perhaps with minor exception like descending a super long mountain pass, in which case the bigger PHEV battery absorbs much more regenerative kWh and therefore can flip back to EV mode and shut ICE off automatically. I drive my PHEV in Quebec/Ontario and have adapted the family to driving with a cold cabin/heated seats in winter, as Sonata PHEV cabin heating system uses a ton of gas. ICE's have lots of wasted heat that goes to warm the cabin, while efficient PHEV's have little self-generated heat so that means running the engine just for heating. Its not a drawback for us, rather a tradeoff that all EV drivers must adapt to.
 

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This forum is the most EV/Alt Energy ignorant forum I have observed.
If one want to be educated on this topic, check out:
ChevyBolt.org
Go to topics: such as "How To Lower Energy And Operating Costs On EVs"

Learn from people that know what they are talking about.
Try not to be insulting to the forum and people that are looking to learn and others looking to share knowledge. Good thing you're here to save the day.

Why do you have a PHEV and not an EV (Bolt) then? Maybe you do?
 

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PHEV runs just like Sonata Hybrid once the battery range is depleted, perhaps with minor exception like descending a super long mountain pass, in which case the bigger PHEV battery absorbs much more regenerative kWh and therefore can flip back to EV mode and shut ICE off automatically. I drive my PHEV in Quebec/Ontario and have adapted the family to driving with a cold cabin/heated seats in winter, as Sonata PHEV cabin heating system uses a ton of gas. ICE's have lots of wasted heat that goes to warm the cabin, while efficient PHEV's have little self-generated heat so that means running the engine just for heating. Its not a drawback for us, rather a tradeoff that all EV drivers must adapt to.
The one other difference with the PHEV, is the ability to switch the car into something closer to a "normal gas mode" in which it recharges the battery (rather than switch into EV mode). This is mostly meant for longer trips, where you won't lose too much fuel economy but end up, once you are back in stop and go traffic, with the full range on your EV battery. It should take only about 30 minutes to fully charge the battery in this mode, at which point the car will switch back to a hybrid mode.
 
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