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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,
I'm looking for a more comfortable ride for my wife. We do not care about looks.
Right now we have 195/50/16 tires that need replacing.
I know different rims and tires is the best answer, but I'm trying to keep the cost down by keeping the current rims (16's).
So whats the largest tire size we can get a way with on the current stock 16" rims 2012 Accent?

195/55/16?
195/60/16?
195/65/16?
or any other combo for the best riding comfort?
Thanks

http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/tirecalc.php?tires=195-50r16-195-60r16
 

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I could be wrong, but usually putting bigger/heavier tires on a car makes the suspension work harder and when your suspension is working harder, the ride gets bumpier. Unless you go with a smaller rim to compensate for the bigger tire I think you won't be getting any benefits.
 

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Hello,
I'm looking for a more comfortable ride for my wife. We do not care about looks.
Right now we have 195/50/16 tires that need replacing.
I know different rims and tires is the best answer, but I'm trying to keep the cost down by keeping the current rims (16's).
So whats the largest tire size we can get a way with on the current stock 16" rims 2012 Accent?

195/55/16?
195/60/16?
195/65/16?
or any other combo for the best riding comfort?
Thanks

195/50-R16 vs 195/60-R16 Tire Comparison - Tire Size Calculator

Continental makes the Extreme Contact DWS tire that is the same size as the stock tire. They have a soft sidewall and provide a very smooth ride. Consider these as well.
 

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I think you probably want to be more concerned with the comfort level of the tire versus the bigger sizes. In general, the bigger tires and rims detract from the ride quality...not always, but a 17" lower profile tire will usually not ride as well as a 15" or 16" equivalent tire that has a higher sidewall. You might be better served by a 205/50-16 in a Touring style tire if ride comfort is the big concern. I've heard good things about the Bridgestone Ecopia EP422 for both ride comfort and actual MPG gains. You might take a small hit with this tire in the steering response / handling category vs. OEM but it'll ride nice. It's not a performance tire so if you've got designs on taking offramps at 70 MPH this won't do it for you. Then again, something like this might be too far in the Eco direction and you'd want to consider something in the "high performance all-season" category with better handling but still a decent ride. Checking reviews on Tire Rack and other sites can give you a better idea.
 

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205-50-16 tires will fit on the stock 16 inch rims just fine. This broadens your options on the brand of tires you want, especially if you want a quieter tire.

Comfort in ride quality is more akin to the suspension, which is very basic for the accent... Tires really don't help with "comfort", just noise, grip and stopping length. Ever rode in a Cadillac sedan or Lincoln town car? now that is like riding on a bed with wheels.
 

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If you are looking for comfort without extra costs for fancier tyres I will assume you are not expecting improvements in handling or longevity - I suggest you buy a tyre pressure gauge and try gradually dropping the pressures until you find a suitable comfort level.
 

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205-50-16 tires will fit on the stock 16 inch rims just fine. This broadens your options on the brand of tires you want, especially if you want a quieter tire.

Comfort in ride quality is more akin to the suspension, which is very basic for the accent... Tires really don't help with "comfort", just noise, grip and stopping length. Ever rode in a Cadillac sedan or Lincoln town car? now that is like riding on a bed with wheels.
I think that the Accent has a relatively soft suspension ( especially for a subcompact ) but I don't buy into the idea that tires don't help with the comfort level. I can base that on my own experiences with a VW Golf and a Mazda 3. The Golf's OEM Goodyears had some pretty bad impact shock issues over potholes and expansion joints, etc. Switching to softer Continentals pretty much eliminated this issue. Similarly, the Mazda had a fairly stiff suspension that definitely exhibited different ride qualities based largely on the type of tire ( ex. "Grand Touring" vs. "Ultra High Performance" ). I would assume the key is finding the balance between the soft suspension of the Accent and what your priorities are in terms of handling, comfort, longevity, and even MPG these days as some of these low rolling resistance Eco tires really DO boost gas mileage. Something that would probably take a higher priority in the Accent. Personally, I think it can be harder to find the right tire for a softly sprung car than it is for a performance car.
 
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