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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to buy an LED daylight running light bar to add to the lower grill of my 2007 Santa Fe.

I have seen some really complex methods of hooking up the drl, but most of them involve removing a lot of panels under the steering column.

On the 'Net I also saw a simple method of hooking up LED drl's that involves running a wire to the parking light harness and grounding the other end to an unpainted part of the frame.

Right now I run my low beams 24/7 just so I can been seen on surface streets. I do have to replace bulbs probably once a year, but that is the price for safety. I always remove the headlight pod to change out the bulbs, so it is a piece of cake job.

I thought of adding some LED's because they last so much longer, pull lower juice, and the safety effect would probably be the same as headlamps as well as looking a bit more up-to-date.

Has anyone been able to add dlr's using the parking light method?

Thanks,

Daniel
 

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I just buy a DRL harnness which hooks up to the battery and the LED's. They will turn on as soon as your ignition switch is to IGN. There is one more wire that you can connect to your low beam to turn them off automatically when you switch your lights on.

There is no reason that you can't just tap the + positive leads of your LED's to the + pos lead of your parking lights and ground both LED - negative wires to a good chassis ground. That will work just fine for you especially if you want to run your tail lamps (which most people are opposed to), because they are sometimes mistaken as brake lights in the day time. Which creates a safety issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thought of that too, but wondered why the light wouldn't stay on all the time if hooked just to the + post of the battery.

I would rather not have the rest of the lights on as you say tail lights get confused for brake lights.

I guess I don't care if the drl stays on all the time even if the low and high beams are on also.

Is there something special with your drl that senses when the ignition is on? I noticed that some LED drl's have a box that comes with the purchase.

Daniel
 

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I bought this harness for the last set I fitted:

12V LED Light Daytime Running Light DRL Relay Harness Automatic Switch Control | eBay

he posts worldwide, but you may be able to source something similar locally.

I wanted the DRL's to function when the headlights were on so it was a simply two wire connection to the battery. Neat, unobtrusive and works perfectly. The delay is relatively short when you turn the ignition off, but offers some 'guide me home' light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I found that the fuse block under the hood is powered by the ignition, and all I have to do is locate a blank fuse socket, place the + wire in the non-powered side and shove a fuse onto the wire to hold it in place.

That way the lights will work independently of the others, which is the best case scenario here.

All I need to get is a volt tester to which side the socket is hot.

There is a fuse that has a connector attached, but I have mini fuses and have not found one like that yet.

Daniel
 

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I found that the fuse block under the hood is powered by the ignition, and all I have to do is locate a blank fuse socket, place the + wire in the non-powered side and shove a fuse onto the wire to hold it in place.

That way the lights will work independently of the others, which is the best case scenario here.

All I need to get is a volt tester to which side the socket is hot.

There is a fuse that has a connector attached, but I have mini fuses and have not found one like that yet.

Daniel
You could indeed do this, with a correctly rated fuse. Trapping the wire with the fuse isn't ideal and is more likely over time to fail given the inherent vibrations.

Be careful probing around with a voltage tester as modern cars (with ECU's and airbags) are very suscpetible to unintentional voltage spikes.

If you're after doing it properly, you're still better taking power directly from the battery, with an inline fuse holder. Just my 2c worth.
 

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You can't take power 'directly from the battery' unless the ground side is switched. What switched device are you using for the 'other side' of the connection that turns them on and off?
 

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canderson, you're right - I should've made it clear I was still referring to making the connection directly to the battery using the auto relay I posted a link to above.
 

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OK. Got it. That explains the delay on shut-down as well ... timed relay.

What is the device using for the switched side of the connection to let it know it's time to start the shut-off countdown? (i.e., where's it connected on the non-battery side?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The device I am looking at must have its own switch as there is a black box connected to the lights through a wire.

Maybe direct battery connection is the best, but I am still wondering why it wouldn't be turned on 24/7. Is the black box that smart?
 

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canderson, I'll admit I've given little thought as to how the set up works. The 'smart box' as it's referred to in the instructions is connected on the input side directly to the positive and negative poles of the battery, with a third wire to be connected to the positive side of the sidelights. I've installed 3 of these now and not connected the wire to deactivate the DRLs on the basis we all wanted maximum light at all times.

The output side connects directly to the DRLs.

Hope this helps. If I can find the wiring that came with some DRLs that were DOA I'll bust it open and post pictures.
 

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They typically work by sensing voltage changes - i.e. when the engine is running the voltage increases, then reduces when engine is turned off and isn't getting charge from the alternator.
 

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I would have expected a 3 wire system. +12, ground, and a control. The control would decide when the lights some one, and when the timer begins to turn them off. It's the 'control' wire I'd be interested in knowing about. Technically, all it needs is to be connected to any 'switched' +12 point (vs. ground, which I had earlier thought).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If they sense voltage drop, will they turn on if the battery gets low and the car ignition is in the off position? I drive both of my cars weekly, but wouldn't want it to turn on by itself.
 

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I've seen a lot of devices over the years that attempt to use voltage sensing for triggering (including radar detectors, and alarm systems that attempt to see a drop when the dome light comes on with an open door), but I've seen a number of them that haven't worked all that well. Hooked directly to the battery, the delta with and without alternator should provide a reliable enough measurement, but I still don't trust them.
 

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They turn on when the voltage increases because the battery is getting charge from the alternator, so wouldn't turn on inadvertently whilst the car isn't running.

Mine had been fitted for a couple of years and have never been a problem. They're fit and forget.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Great! I will get one with the controler and not just hook it up with the parking lights like the cheaps suggest.

Thanks for the responses. They have been very helpful. I am going to order one online and maybe post a photo when finished.

If I like them, I plan on placing one on my Sonata as well.

Daniel
 
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