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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Accent 2013 misfires past 3200 rpm, Edit: fuel filter

Accent 2013 misfires past 3200 rpm under load and this has happened since I got this car last march (2017) (bought it used)

I measured the coils and all of them measure 1 Ω

The manual says it has to measure 0.75 Ω +/- 15%

so that´s 0.86 Ω


Anyway I changed already spark plugs and put the really expensive ones:
NGK 93815 SILZKR6B10E Laser Iridium Spark Plug

Also changed the 2 Oxygen sensors with the Denso original parts (bought them at rockauto.com) (Also the O2 sensors were really black at their tip...making me think it was running really rich), changed the air filter and put a can of fuel cleaner and then another of Seafoam to the gas tank.

Also, changed the manual transmission oil.

I´m in hot hot hot central america weather so I´m using Mobil 10w30

This made a huge increase in performance and also the car improved a lot the misfires to the point it only happens going under load uphill with the revs above 3200 RPM.
Compression is 165,168,168,165 psi (No smoke at all)

Also no CEL (check engine light ) on.

I´m running out of ideas.

Want to add some seafoam to the oil 300 miles before I change the oil.

What do you guys think ?

I bought this car used last year in March it was from a girl in New York (she left the papers and manuals in the glove box) and then someone imported to central america.
It seems this girl neglected some maintenance on it for quite a while.

My only complain are the misfires other than that the car runs really fine compared to my honda civic I´d say it is almost as fast as it. Being the difference the pull the civic has when pushing the gas pedal it is stronger and more firm. And the power the civic has when it goes uphill.
This is a very volcanic country so a lot of uphills and valleys.

Any help is really appreciated.

Thank you for your time to read and reply.

EDIT:

also forgot to ask, does this car uses a fuel filter in tank ? like the civic?

The civic does uses a fuel filter and it is a replaceable/serviceable part the only issue with it is you have to remove the back seat and pull the fuel pump assembly. Then change the filter from the assembly.
Rockauto sells the filter for the civic ( More Information for BECK/ARNLEY 0433012 ) and I was expecting to see a fuel filter for the accent but can´t seem to find one on rockauto or other place online and even I´m conscious a fuel additive cleaner cleans I too know the fuel filter inside the tank clogs over time.
Given my experience with my civic I can say it does really help changing the fuel filter even if you frequently use fuel cleaner additives that´s not enough and it won´t be as putting a new fuel filter.

EDIT #2:
obviously this guy thinks it is built to last 20+ years (that´s the time I keep cars) He is so wrong thinking it will last like that with the gas quality in central america....lol ! that´s a joke!
https://www.justanswer.com/hyundai/7sm9p-hyundai-fuel-filter-gas-tank-fuel-pump.html
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
WOW, 365 people saw my post but it seems no one was willing to help or they don´t know what could be the issue...

Anyway I finally fixed. I knew there was something weird with this. Anyway what I did was put 4.0 fluid ounces of seafoam to the oil prior to 300 miles of oil change and drive it normally.

I also learned this is a GDI engine and this mf tends to accumulate soot and carbon. So I disassembled the intake manifold and ordered from rockauto. com the intake manifold gasket and the throttle body gasket. I manually cleaned the intake valves (took about 3 hours) (have pictures of before and after) and then reassembled everything.
After that I sprayed a can of CRC IVD and followed can instructions (total spray time was about 25 minutes). Waited for 1 hour. And went to drive the car to the highway for 35 minutes...literally a CLOUD OF SMOKE came out of the tail pipe!!!

Now my car is cured !!! no more misfires, no more pings, no more rattles!!!!!

It was all that carbon in the intake valves the culprit !!!

Hope this can help anyone!!

Greetings from Central America.

And to think the American girl who had this car didn´t want it because she thought it was dying.... ha ha ha !!!

I don´t blame her but I do blame Hyundai for creating such problematic engine. GDI = CARBON DEPOSITS

And to fix it right I added an Oil Catch Can to prevent oil accumulation and carbon build up on those mf valves again.

Will continue to use CRC IVD every 10,000 miles or maybe less.

All in all, I spent less than $ 100.00 to fix this.

And to think some people wants $ 600 to do walnut blast cleaning method.

Forget it! not for me in Central America!!! ha ha ha !!!
 

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Sometimes posts just drop off a board quickly because no one who has a good answer sees it right away. The post goes to bottom page or over to page two and stays buried until somebody dig it up in a search about the same problem. This is the first day I'm seeing your post, I'm pretty sure. Not that I could have given you any good advice about what to do. It sounds like you have it figured out, though.

I am just now, at 80,000 miles, headed down the path of using Seafoam on my 1.6L GDI engine internally. I've done the CRC intake valve cleaning spray thing before and I'll be doing it again. I don't have misfires, but I don't want to get them either. When you say there were misfires, you're talking about actual misfire codes, like p0300 etc. stored in the ECU, right?

Also, I am at the point where I really want to have a look at the intake valves directly, and clean them if needed. Already have an intake manifold gasket, but lacking the nerve and a definite plan. It sounds like you separated the intake manifold from the throttle body (you needed to replace TB gasket) . Did you keep the TB attached to all its hoses and just leave it in the car? In the factory service manual, the procedure for air intake manifold removal seems to assume the TB stays attached to the manifold --they come out together-- so all connections to the intake and TB have to be disconnected. There are some coolant hoses attached to the TB in addition to vacuum lines. I'm a little nervous about disconnecting those.

How did you clean your intake valves - what product and method? You say you have pictures of before cleaning and after. Could you please do us all a huge favor and post those here? That would be a great service to everyone with this engine.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sometimes posts just drop off a board quickly because no one who has a good answer sees it right away. The post goes to bottom page or over to page two and stays buried until somebody dig it up in a search about the same problem. This is the first day I'm seeing your post, I'm pretty sure. Not that I could have given you any good advice about what to do. It sounds like you have it figured out, though.
Yes that happened to me today. And I can see you replied.
And here´s what I have to say:

I don´t know why I wasn´t notified I had a new post. Anyway, yes I removed the intake manifold.


I am just now, at 80,000 miles, headed down the path of using Seafoam on my 1.6L GDI engine internally. I've done the CRC intake valve cleaning spray thing before and I'll be doing it again. I don't have misfires, but I don't want to get them either. When you say there were misfires, you're talking about actual misfire codes, like p0300 etc. stored in the ECU, right?


Yes there were 2 codes. Yes, P0300 and P0301. We cleared them. The Check Engine Light hasn´t come back since then.
Oh well yes it came back once but because the gas cap was loose but that´s another story.


Also, I am at the point where I really want to have a look at the intake valves directly, and clean them if needed. Already have an intake manifold gasket, but lacking the nerve and a definite plan. It sounds like you separated the intake manifold from the throttle body (you needed to replace TB gasket) . Did you keep the TB attached to all its hoses and just leave it in the car? In the factory service manual, the procedure for air intake manifold removal seems to assume the TB stays attached to the manifold --they come out together-- so all connections to the intake and TB have to be disconnected. There are some coolant hoses attached to the TB in addition to vacuum lines. I'm a little nervous about disconnecting those.



I did get help from a friend who is a mechanic. Yes, we removed the manifold and we disconnected all those hoses you were talking about. I bought my throttle body gasket from rockauto but guess what? the MF didn´t fit. It seems to be the part but only issue is it is bigger (don´t really know why) but we ended reusing the old one.

I removed the throttle body because I also wanted to clean it from behind but I think you can let it attached to the intake manifold without any problem.
The gasket that did fit perfect was the one for the intake manifold. I also bought it from rockauto. Both gaskets are FELPRO brand. About the intake manifold it is pretty straight (I can´t say it is difficult but it isn´t easy either). The only difficult part was removing the knock sensor bolt and connector that´s below the intake manifold (You actually have to access the car from below to remove it)

Then we started to rotate by hand the alternator (with the ratchet) in order to rotate the engine and manually open and close the valves (This is an standard manual transmission accent)

We sprayed CRC Intake Valve cleaner directly on the valves. Let them soak for a while (this is the part that takes some time because you want the product to penetrate and remove the carbon deposits, while the liquid was there we were scraping the valves a little bit in order to remove the carbon easily)Then as we were spending too much time removing with a rag the rest of the product (after it had penetrated and removed the carbon) my friend suggested to use his compressor in order to blow air (and also the liquid) from the valves and this made a difference because we ended faster. We were placing a rag every time we were blowing air in there to prevent any nasty spills or creating a mess.






How did you clean your intake valves - what product and method? You say you have pictures of before cleaning and after. Could you please do us all a huge favor and post those here? That would be a great service to everyone with this engine.


Yes I have 2 or 3 pictures (don´t want to create too much expectations in you because the photos are from the valves actually. But yes! there´s a whole world of difference)

I will upload them tomorrow because I have them in other computer. It´s 11:30 PM here in central america. Time to hit the sack !


Thanks!

You´re welcome


Also I forgot to add that I was going to say that I found the fuel filter.
I can buy it online and that´s what I´m going to do next.:grin2:
I found it here:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OEM-Parts-311121R000-1Pcs-Inner-Tank-Filter-Fuel-Pump-For-HYUNDAI-Car-/162709889986?_trksid=p2349526.m4383.l4275.c1#viTabs_0


and here:


hyundaioemparts
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There you go. Any questions contact me.

As I said, next thing I will do is the fuel filter.



Is there any how to for the fuel filter around here?


Maybe someone has changed it already and can offer advice on that. Again I think Hyundai should specify a fuel filter change interval.
This remembers me of Scottie Kilmer video I saw yesterday about the fuel filter in modern cars. He talks about how the in tank filters go inside the fuel tank and still you need to change it.

You can watch it here:
 

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Awesome information. I've never seen the inside of the intake of any Accent GDI engine - lots of other GDI engines but never an Accent. Your pics show exactly I fear I will find on my intake valves. Some say it doesn't happen with the Gamma engine. Some say it happens to some but not others. Some say it happens to all Direct Injected engines eventually. You never know until you look. But at that point you're already committed to a pretty expensive procedure (b/c of labor costs in a shop), and nobody wants to risk that unless they know they really need to. That clinches it for me - the intake is coming off.
 

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Accounts from owners of other GDI engined cars strongly suggest that once a GDI engine has hard carbon deposits baked onto the valves, spray in cleaners don't clear them out.



I've actually used the CRC GDI spray in stuff and Berryman's combustion chamber cleaner before on my Accent - 3 times over the past 5 yrs. I have some of both still in the garage. I used half a can of Berryman's after my pinging re-appeared this summer. No use. It's just time for the intake to come off. Maybe there aren't even any deposits to clean and the ping is due to something else.



About the fuel filter. The factory service manual gives a procedure for replacing it on page 1020, in the Fuel System section.
Factory Service Manual : Dev-Host - Accent - 2013 RB - G 1.6 GDI - 20130522.zip - The Ultimate Free File Hosting / File Sharing Service

Of course the instructions refer to other procedures that must be completed first - removing back seat, removing fuel pump. Looks like an afternoon of DIY fun to replace one small paper filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey thanks for the fuel filter info. Really appreciated!!
And maybe something good about living in a third world country is that labor is cheap. Problem is to find someone who really knows and understands about this. I've been lucky because my friend is a certified level 2 Toyota tech (but he got fired after having financial issues. So the Toyota dealership here in my country thought he was not concentrating enough in his job and more in his personal financial issues and fired him) and he's been working on every kind of car since then (on the street) next to a big mango tree (shade-tree mechanic that's how we call him). He has more than 27 years of experience. Also he doesn't charge a lot. All he asked for his help and expertise was USD $40.00 for the cleaning process of the intake valves.
 

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I'm sorry to say this but it seems the link is dead / broken


can you upload it somewhere else for me to download it ?


Thanks a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Lazy H, If you're planning to do the intake valve cleaning procedure then you should get 2 cans of CRC Intake valve cleaner.
One can for spraying it directly in the valves and the other can to spray it through the pcv hose that goes directly to the manifold. Of course you will do that once the car is assembled and you have done a ride on it in order to reach normal operating temperature. You will do it as per the can instructions or as the other user pointed out with the Napa instructions.

Once you have waited the mandatory 60 minutes the can says then you will start the car and will go for a ride.
As soon as you push the gas pedal hard you will probably hear strange noises (like heavy rattle) Don't panic! It is normal !! Is the carbon remaining and soot left inside the combustion chamber and the exhaust valves. The intake valve cleaner is working and is taking them out of the interior of the engine where they have been adhered.

Do not stop pushing the gas pedal hard ! Give it gas !! and you will literally see the big cloud of smoke coming out of your tail pipe.

Also you may want to add the oil catch can. To prevent the valves to get dirty so often. I bought mine on Amazon. You don't need an expensive one. Look for "Ruien Polish Baffled Universal Aluminum Oil Catch Can Reservoir Tank Blue"
But the hoses that came with it are very poor quality so I put another ones.
I thought it would be a good idea after watching this video:


Hope this can help you better.

Take care and feel free to contact me if you have any question.
 

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You are grasping at straws. You need to scope the ignition while it's misfiring.
 
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