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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My moms 01 sante fe 2.7 4wd's climate control is not working.

The compressor is not engaging when commanded on.

I jumped 12 volts to the 1 pin connector leading into the clutch, nothing happened.

I jumped ground to the 1 pin connector on the compressor side, nothing happened.

I am going to bring my multimeter home from work tomorrow and test for 12v at the connector.

There is 134a in the system. Static pressures are okay.

Fuse checked and good.

Relay is checked and good.

Blower motor works.

Questions:

1. Is the clutch servicable on these AC compressors? Part numbers?

2. Should I be checking for Power or ground on the connector going to the AC clutch? I am certain it is power, but just so i dont assume and make an **** out of myself.

3. What is the AC diode for? Test procedures for functionality?

4. Any suggestions for diagnosis.
 

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Engine at idle :

Put your finger on the A/C relay, have helper operate the A/C button... feel the relay click ?

There is a 10A (red) A/C fuse in the engine compartment block that is the power for the field coil... touch DVOM test lead to both legs looking for source voltage. Field coil is self ground at compressor body.

Connector at compressor should have source voltage when system switched on...... be aware that system needs adequate pressure to close triple switch to allow system to work,,,, so you could be wasting time when the system is actually low on R-134.

If it is out of R-134, be aware that the compressor body is likely the source of your leak, and a re-man compressor is available, I've replace 2 already in last 2 weeks on 2.7L, 1 Sonata, 1 Santa Fe.. we keep 1 or 2 on shelf.

Inspect field coil for resistance value, I think it is 3 ohm +/- a couple points for temp factor..

Field coil is avaliable as service part, but verify charge, resistance, power, compressor not seized (try to turn hub by hand)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I was out there i heard the relay snap down. I then switched it with a known good relay (an adjacent relay for something else that was in working condition). No change from that. I also switched the AC fuses with the horn fuse (same amperage rating, horn circuit operational). No change from that. I did spin the hub, and it moves free. Unfortunatly, my test light and dvom are in my tool box in work.

Once I can get my DVOM out of work tomorrow, ill follow this path.

1.Ohm out clutch, anticipating approx. 3 ohms. If out of spec, replace clutch.

2. Inspect for battery voltage at 1 pin connector. If not present, I'll take it into work so I can evacuate the system to ensure that the proper charge is installed.

3. If proper weight is present, I'll inspect the H/L pressure cut switch.



Any source for wiring diagrams for the pressure cut switch? I don't feel like buying a manual.

Thanks for help.
 

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I determinted that the field coil went bad on mine. Do I need a puller to get the clutch off of this compressor? Coil is not cheap at $100 and it is not available at any auto parts store. Only other alternative is a junk yard.
 

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QUOTE (pemdas1972 @ Aug 14 2010, 02:22 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=349275
I determinted that the field coil went bad on mine. Do I need a puller to get the clutch off of this compressor? Coil is not cheap at $100 and it is not available at any auto parts store. Only other alternative is a junk yard.

In reality, you will need to remove compressor and bench it... the small screw for the ground wire eyelet is not accessible with compressor mounted to engine, and you may tear the screw head with driver...

For $340, you can get a Hyundai Re-Man compressor.... The compressor with age likes to leak at the body halves, and as of late, MOBIS been selling field coils boxed with correct part number, and wrong connector on the coil to fit the engine harness connector, so BEWARE when buying the filed coil...

Not be good to put time into a field coil and find that compressor or system takes dump next month, so weigh your options, we order the coil, but we keep the compressor on the shelf... I think I installed 2 Re-Man compressor last month..

If you do take the compressor out and fielc coil the thing, remove the bolt at center of drive plate, lift drive plate off compressor shaft.... BE AWARE of tiny washer/shim in the bore of the drive plate, may stay in there, or lay on shaft, MAKE SURE you know where it is, HAS TO BE INSTALLED or drive plate will drag pulley friction surface..

Remove snap ring, and the pulley should slide off, may have to tap pulley to slide it off...

We have 2 way of holding field coil to compressor nose, 1st is snap ring, remove and wiggle coil off... 2nd is the coil is pressed onto the compressor nose... I take hammer and carefully knock old coil off, then set compressor in press, and set up to carefully push new field coil into place, need to align the tabs/ears so coil is oriented correct for short wire/eyelet to fit back to ground screw hole..
 

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Yesterday when I ran the tests on the field coil I was able to easily loosen the ground screw using a short screwdriver from the top. Other than that is there any other reason to have to remove the compressor? I was hoping to replace the coil without having to discharge the system and open more work and possibly another can of worms. I know someone that is going to hook me up with a compressor from another junked santa fe so I may be in luck. I should have my hands on it by Monday. The production date of my vehicle is July of 2001. Were there any changes to the field coil during the entire production of the 1G Santa Fe? From what I know from calling the dealer I asked for the part number for 2002 and 2004 model years and the part number is the same. As far as Mobis packing field coils with the wrong connectors I will check it at the parts counter before paying if I go that route but if that is the case I may just buy a remanufactured compressor.
 

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Be aware that the reason for the coil open is an embedded heat sensor fuse in the coil. Not replaceable. Needs whole coil.
However, it begs the question as the fuse only goes when there is an over temperature condition. The usual over temp is either the compressor bearing or an internal compressor failure. Try turning the center bolt on the compressor ( not the pulley). Should be easy to turn.
If not, you need a compressor. Voice of experience.
 

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I replaced the field coil today and want to share my repair experience.

Disclaimer: This is how I did it and it worked well for me. I am not responsible if something breaks on you.

As far as ordering a replacement field coil I purchased an aftermarket one from a seller on ebay that specializes in selling coils and clutches. If anyone needs a coil I would be more than happy to provide the contact. Just PM me. The cost was $45 shipped vs. $106 plus tax from the dealer. The coil was the right part with two differences: The heat sensor that is on the original coil and clearly visible on the face of the coil is not present on the replacement which is nice since that is one less thing to break and believe that is what went bad on mine (I contacted the seller after this post and the heat sensor is present in the new coil as well it just can't be seen). The connector on the new coil is different than the original as noted by sbr711 a few threads earlier and the dealer part has the same problem. This was easily resolved with a pair of needle nose pliers, a pick, and a bent paper clip to carefully back the wire and contact out of the original connector and moving it over to the new one. No cutting of the wire was required.

I accessed the compressor by removing the right front tire, access cover, and removing the front half of the wheel well cover and rolling it out of the way to rest behind the brake rotor.
Before removing the belt I used a pair of large joint pliers to clamp around the pulley and hub leaning on one of the rivets on the hub to keep the hub from turning. It worked perfectly to remove the center bolt. I easily removed the hub being careful not to lose any shims. Then I removed the serpentine belt from around the compressor pulley and moved it out of the way behind the crankshaft pulley.
Give the compressor pulley a spin and listen for bearing noise. If there is then you need to replace the pulley or if you are handy replace the bearing (cheaper).
I removed the snap ring from around the compressor nose (make sure you have those snap ring pliers handy) that holds the pulley and I used a 6 inch 3 jaw puller and a 13/16 or larger socket to put over the compressor nose to remove the pulley as to not to put pressure on the compressor shaft otherwise the compressor may get damaged.
To remove the coil I disconnected the wires and used a pry bar to slowly pry the coil from the compressor body all around as evenly as possible (It also has been noted earlier in this thread that the coil may be held by a snap ring as well but in my case it was not.) I used the compressor bolts as a pivot point to apply pressure. Do not use any other part of the compressor body to pry.

To install the coil I aligned it so the wires are in the correct position and used the old coil to tap the new one into place as evenly on both sides as possible. I then took a 2x4 that extends past the wheel well to finish tapping the coil all around the rest of the way. Make sure the coil is fully seated on the compressor body all around. Looking from the top of the engine bay you can easily see if there still is a gap. You will know if it is not fully seated when you attempt to start pressing the pulley into place and the pulley does not turn freely (ran into this.)
Screw the ground wire onto the compressor body and plug in the connector and slide it onto the bracket.
Tap the pulley into place. You will need a large socket or equivalent such as a pipe large enough to go around the compressor nose to tap the pulley in the rest of the way and install the snap ring.
Install the serpentine belt and install the hub with the shims. Use the joint pliers to hold the pulley and hub in place to tighten the center bolt.
Put everything else back together and was good to go.

I found that the hub and pulley had very little wear and were in excellent condition for 97,000 miles and with daily use of the A/C system in the spring and summer months throughout the life of the vehicle.

Things to inspect:
Spin the hub to check that it spins with little resistance. If it's extremely hard to turn then the compressor is probably bad.
Spin the pulley to check for bearing noise and check for play. If the bearing is bad a new bearing can be pressed in. I found them on ebay for about $12.


This video on youtube is a good example on what the hub, pulley, and coil look like on the Santa Fe as well as an explanation of how to change out the pulley bearing.
 
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