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Hello (I accidently posted this originally to the wrong forum) ~

My mother's 2010 Hyundai Elantra is giving us fit. One thing after another lately ~ specifically the ABS module this time. Can someone tell me if there are other year model Elantras I can pull an ABS module from to replace the one on mom's 2010? Thanks in advance!

Faith
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello (I accidently posted this originally to the wrong forum) ~

My mother's 2010 Hyundai Elantra is giving us fit. One thing after another lately ~ specifically the ABS module this time. Can someone tell me if there are other year model Elantras I can pull an ABS module from to replace the one on mom's 2010? Thanks in advance!

Faith
Thank you for replying.
Her ABS light will not go off. The mechanic that replaced her driver-side speed/wheel sensor said he reverse followed the problem back to the module as the reason it will not go off. We called a local dealership and the department manager said the east expensive way to fix it would be to go to a pull-a-part place, unplug the module from the junkyard car and the one from mom's car, swapping them out for an estimated $15 bucks or so.
 

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2009 to 2011 Elantra sedans should be compatible (even though 2011 looks different, the same ABS module was used for that year).

I'm not 100% sure about the ABS modules on these, and I would check if the sister in-law wasn't currently borrowing our 2010... but on some ABS module assemblies, the actual electronic module can be removed from the part that controls the flow of the brake fluid with just a few screws, and can be changed without opening up the brake's hydraulic system, so no fluid is lost and no bleeding is necessary. I've done this on my 2004 Chevy Blazer in the past when I had an ABS fault in it.

But if it is NOT able to be separated easily, then the entire unit needs to be disconnected, which opens up the brake fluid hydraulic system, looses fluid, and introduces air into the system, which is more complicated to bleed out with ABS modules in the loop compared to how it is on older vehicles with no ABS. Requires plugging in a computer system to actuate the ABS module during the bleeding process to get all of the air out, which isn't something you can do at home unless you have the right equipment.

I would say that it's worth a shot if you can pick up a module in a salvage yard. Should be able to get a used one for less than $100. I would even go as far as to check online like eBay.

And $15 is a far price for installation if they're including the full bleeding of the lines.
 
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