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About 9 months ago the a/c was severely underperforming but a recharge from a can put it back in working order. All good.

So, came home from a months leave, to find the a/c blowing hot, recirc mode no help, and no amount of wait time improved. Weird, cause there was no warning, it was working perfectly right before the trip — wasn’t a slow failure over time like before.

Other than the fuse, what other troubleshooting can I do to at least Understand what may need to be repaired so as not to get taken. From so many stories, it seems diagnosis is a lost skill in a lot of repair places —. Let’s just rip things out seems to be the “diagnosis” method.

I looked at the chiton on line for the sonata, but although it had troubleshooting summary, I could not find the underlying pages for the individual steps in the version my library gave access to.

Should I be able to “visually” see the a/c engage when turned on? If so, can someone point me to a good video of that?


Finally, in the US, assuming compressor is actually bad (and is worse case costscenario) what kind of $$$ should I expect to shell out.

I’d tell my daughter to tough it out... but when the daily temp is 108 (and often 112) its not an optional repair.

Thank you
 

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About 9 months ago the a/c was severely underperforming but a recharge from a can put it back in working order. All good.

So, came home from a months leave, to find the a/c blowing hot, recirc mode no help, and no amount of wait time improved. Weird, cause there was no warning, it was working perfectly right before the trip — wasn’t a slow failure over time like before.

Other than the fuse, what other troubleshooting can I do to at least Understand what may need to be repaired so as not to get taken. From so many stories, it seems diagnosis is a lost skill in a lot of repair places —. Let’s just rip things out seems to be the “diagnosis” method.

I looked at the chiton on line for the sonata, but although it had troubleshooting summary, I could not find the underlying pages for the individual steps in the version my library gave access to.

Should I be able to “visually” see the a/c engage when turned on? If so, can someone point me to a good video of that?


Finally, in the US, assuming compressor is actually bad (and is worse case costscenario) what kind of $$$ should I expect to shell out.

I’d tell my daughter to tough it out... but when the daily temp is 108 (and often 112) its not an optional repair.

Thank you
Did you try another can of 134A? When looking at the compressor you'll know the clutch engages when the entire front of the compressor is spinning. When not engaged only the outer ring the belt rides on will be spinning. That's how they all work that have a clutch. Not sure if yours is the variable compressor. No need for video. For professional level information try a subscription to this place.
 

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Thanks for reply @grcauto

so, I was able to have some unexpected help here at home, and indeed, I could see (and hear) the clutch engage when toggling the switch on and off. (Couldn't see it before when doing it on my own, walking back and forth).

I believe I read there is supposed to be a separate fan from the main radiator fan for the A/C system as well.

I was reluctant to just pump another can in with the failure being so sudden. (last time it was needed, it was more of a gradual failure.). Off to auto zone, and will report back.
 

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Thanks for reply @grcauto

so, I was able to have some unexpected help here at home, and indeed, I could see (and hear) the clutch engage when toggling the switch on and off. (Couldn't see it before when doing it on my own, walking back and forth).

I believe I read there is supposed to be a separate fan from the main radiator fan for the A/C system as well.



Does it have two fans?


I was reluctant to just pump another can in with the failure being so sudden. (last time it was needed, it was more of a gradual failure.). Off to auto zone, and will report back.
DO NOT add any more refrigerant. The system needs specific amounts of oil as well. The clutch is engaging which tells me the electronics are working as well as the pressure and temperature switches/sensors. Does the large pipe that goes towards the back of the engine compartment get cool?
 

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You need to see what the high side pressure is. Probably it's leaked out again. Bad orings more than likely. To repair means quite a bit of work. New filter, orings, pressure reducing valve. 24 hours on a vacuum to ensure it's leak and moisture free. Then a recharge. $400 for the parts and new compressor. $100 for gauges and vacuum pump, both these can be rented though. R134a is around $4 a can in my area, three cans minimum. Two cans of a pressurized AC flush.

It could be you have water in the system with it being low. This may freeze and stop the cold but it should put out some cold when first used.
 

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@grcauto, @Redraspberry:

Thanks for your replies.

So, took it to a non-dealer, AC. Over phone I was simply told I have a leaking compressor, needs to be replaced. $800. Was not given any more details, but didn't expect much over the phone either, so didn't ask figure I should save that for in person.

- Assuming its truly needed, is that a reasonable parts and labor charge?
Sound's like you numbers red were parts only, right?

-What should I ask? For such an old vehicle, if it just means refilling every 6 months, I could live with that instead of a full repair, we may not have this more than 1-2 more years max.

- opinion are the over the counter "AC leak sealers" generally snake oil? not expecting miracles, but since this car is 12 years old, trying to balance the situation., idea to keep it running along, not nessecairly perfection.


thanks,

d.

You need to see what the high side pressure is. Probably it's leaked out again. Bad orings more than likely. To repair means quite a bit of work. New filter, orings, pressure reducing valve. 24 hours on a vacuum to ensure it's leak and moisture free. Then a recharge. $400 for the parts and new compressor. $100 for gauges and vacuum pump, both these can be rented though. R134a is around $4 a can in my area, three cans minimum. Two cans of a pressurized AC flush.

It could be you have water in the system with it being low. This may freeze and stop the cold but it should put out some cold when first used.
 

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Yes my numbers are what I spent last year for a new compressor and related parts in my Accent with me doing the work (first time on AC). If I did it again I would just get a new condenser too as the filter dryer is in it and I had to destroy the OE plastic cap to get to the filter. A new condenser should come with dryer filter and the plug.


ebay and Amazon have kits that include most of what you need for the $300-$400 range.
 

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Yes my numbers are what I spent last year for a new compressor and related parts in my Accent with me doing the work (first time on AC). If I did it again I would just get a new condenser too as the filter dryer is in it and I had to destroy the OE plastic cap to get to the filter. A new condenser should come with dryer filter and the plug.


ebay and Amazon have kits that include most of what you need for the $300-$400 range.
How did you evacuate the system?
 
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