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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
99 Elantra -- timing belt issue / no spin

I have a 99 Elantra. I lost power driving on the highway yesterday and it would not restart.

When I got home, I suspected the timing belt, so I took off the upper timing cover and tried to start the engine. You can see the accessory belt turn and the starter turns the engine freely, but not the timing belt or the camshaft sprocket. The timing belt is not broken, but it does not turn with the starter.

My father in law suggested the keyway on the crankshaft sprocket might have broken, causing the crankshaft to spin freely without turning the timing belt, but I don't know if that quite explains the turning accessory belt.

Any theories or things to check while I have it apart this morning?
 

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Sounds like you wiped the teeth off the belt. You're right, the main cog is keyed and bolted tight with the crankshaft pulley, not likely it's spinning free. But how did it wipe the teeth? When is the last time you changed the belt? Is the head seized?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (jsinton @ Jun 9 2010, 06:49 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331181
Sounds like you wiped the teeth off the belt. You're right, the main cog is keyed and bolted tight with the crankshaft pulley, not likely it's spinning free. But how did it wipe the teeth? When is the last time you changed the belt? Is the head seized?
I bought the car used about 15,000 miles ago. No idea when the timing belt was replaced. I don't have idea whether the head is seized. I assume I can try turning the camshaft sprocket?
 

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its very likely you have damaged the valves, all you can do is fit a new belt, turn the engine over by hand to make sure that it all turns over freelly and if it does do a compression check, however l would lay money on you having to take the head off to replace bent valves
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got the timing belt cover off and I confirmed the shearing of teeth.

The camshaft sprocket turns pretty free now, but I did encounter some resistance. I realize the crankshaft sprocket isn't turning with it, so it might be contacting the piston somewhere, so I didn't force it.

Not much to do now except put a new belt on, set the sprockets and try and rotate it?
 

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You're not supposed to turn the cam too much, as you know it could be bad.

I'd put a new belt on and see what happens. It's pretty easy on that motor.

FYI - A hard lesson to learn this way, but ALWAYS change the timing belt on an old car you buy unless you're sure about how old it is. When I bought mine two years ago, I questioned the former owner repeatedly about the belt. Just changed it a couple weeks ago.
 

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Not to seem glib, but the real real lesson is never buy a car with an interference engine design. It's astounding that manufacturers actually keep making these. The only explanation is "planned obsolescence." Break the timing belt on a non-interference engine, and the valves are safe. I cannot imagine that any benefits from higher performance with a given bore size, or whatever, are worth the risks of an interference engine. Making and selling interference engines is a wrong-headed, block-headed thing to do - a cruel joke to play on customers. Yes, I am the proud owner of a 97 Elantra, 90,000 miles, with the last timing belt change at 65,000. But between the interference engine and the "captive rotors" on the front brakes, and the manufacturing defect in the transmission TCU, and the manufacturing defect with the front window regulators, and the fact that removing an inside door panel involves about a dozen screws, and the brittle composite valve cover, and a half dozen Microsoft-style "features," I would never buy another one. I'll get off the soap box now. Take it away!
 

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you will have a tough time trying to buy a car nowdays that has not got an interference engine, having said that many manufactures are moving over to chain driven engines. as for your other comments if you were to spend a few weeks working in a multi franchise vehicle workshop you would find that the vast majority of vehicles are put together in the same way, in fact repair times for most of the hyundai models are as good if not better that most of the other leading makes, for example l can think of two other models that you have to remove the engine and transmission to change the cam. belt!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your help.

I think the interference design has to do with the higher compression engines made to fit in smaller engine bays, a design must nowadays. Again, pretty hard to avoid. I think chain designs went out of favor as noisy, but are coming back in the name of reliability.
 

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QUOTE (Montego @ Jun 9 2010, 09:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331360
you will have a tough time trying to buy a car nowdays that has not got an interference engine, having said that many manufactures are moving over to chain driven engines. as for your other comments if you were to spend a few weeks working in a multi franchise vehicle workshop you would find that the vast majority of vehicles are put together in the same way, in fact repair times for most of the hyundai models are as good if not better that most of the other leading makes, for example l can think of two other models that you have to remove the engine and transmission to change the cam. belt!
Just so you know, I own, operate, and maintain a fleet of rental vehicles, and I am taking time away from business to address what I feel is a very important question being raised here. In my business, maintenance and reliability are the single biggest operational issues that we focus on, more than marketing. Why? Because, in the hyper-competitive customer-driven and reputation-driven world that I live in, if a company can't offer a good product, marketing won't do jack, except maybe increase the amount of the operating losses. All our cars are imports, with models from the late 90's and early 00's. Comparatively speaking, I can tell you that, despite being popular with customers, the 97 Hyundai Elantra is the most troublesome for ongoing maintenance, as compared to our Toyotas, Hondas, and even Suzukis of comparable vintage. You didn't mention what multi-franchise dealer you've worked with, maybe you've been associated with some of those brands that nearly went under financially in recent years? For laughing out loud. Anyway it seems from your attempt at a refutation that you did not appreciate my original comment, but for perspective, keep in mind that the comment applies specifically to the 2G Elantra, maybe newer Hyundais do not present the same difficulties and disadvantages, and if so, maybe you could present the case of how those issues have been solved in newer generations rather than argue that they are issues shared by most cars, which somehow makes them ok. Have you raised teen-agers? Then I'm sure that you've often pointed out to them that just because everyone else does something wrong, that doesn't make it right. This time I am really chuckling, and counting my blessings that I do not have to pull the engine to change the dome light bulb, on any of my cars. Phew, what a relief.
 

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In the UK the Lantra has a very good reputation for reliability; bullet proof. I and my son both have 2G Lantras (same as US Elantra) and apart from one front window regulator, have had no trouble.
Re. interference engines - unfortunately due to emissions laws getting stricter and the desire for fuel economy, a higher compression engine (and hence interference design) is the only way to satisfy the requirements.
 

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QUOTE (merryfrankster @ Jun 9 2010, 09:21 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331404
Just so you know, I own, operate, and maintain a fleet of rental vehicles, and I am taking time away from business to address what I feel is a very important question being raised here. In my business, maintenance and reliability are the single biggest operational issues that we focus on, more than marketing. Why? Because, in the hyper-competitive customer-driven and reputation-driven world that I live in, if a company can't offer a good product, marketing won't do jack, except maybe increase the amount of the operating losses. All our cars are imports, with models from the late 90's and early 00's. Comparatively speaking, I can tell you that, despite being popular with customers, the 97 Hyundai Elantra is the most troublesome for ongoing maintenance, as compared to our Toyotas, Hondas, and even Suzukis of comparable vintage. You didn't mention what multi-franchise dealer you've worked with, maybe you've been associated with some of those brands that nearly went under financially in recent years? For laughing out loud. Anyway it seems from your attempt at a refutation that you did not appreciate my original comment, but for perspective, keep in mind that the comment applies specifically to the 2G Elantra, maybe newer Hyundais do not present the same difficulties and disadvantages, and if so, maybe you could present the case of how those issues have been solved in newer generations rather than argue that they are issues shared by most cars, which somehow makes them ok. Have you raised teen-agers? Then I'm sure that you've often pointed out to them that just because everyone else does something wrong, that doesn't make it right. This time I am really chuckling, and counting my blessings that I do not have to pull the engine to change the dome light bulb, on any of my cars. Phew, what a relief.

wow, my comments really have touched a raw nerve with you, they were not meant to. you are of course entitled to your opinion and l was just stating mine. there is no way that l am getting involved in any arguments about this one way or another they were just my personal observations on the subject after being in the motor trade for 45 years
 

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Sorry you feel that way merryfrankster.


The interference head should not cause heartache in a properly maintained vehicle.

When my captive rotors wore out, the bearings needed changing anyway, so no biggie there.

I've had the spark plug cover off numerous times changing plugs and never had concerns about it's or the valve covers longevity.

Window regulators fine.

Car is hammered to the limiter more often than it should be and has traversed some pretty ordinary roads here in OZ.

Theer is nothing microsoft like or out of the ordinary to report, I'm afraid. I do maintain it though, as I would any vehicle in my care.

I can understand ham fisted individuals mucking things up but they can do that to any vehicle. I guess rental cars, being the fastest cars in the world :grin: , cop more than their fair share of abuse from ham fisted, budget conscious types.

Cheers,

Andrew
 

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QUOTE (Trakka @ Jun 10 2010, 04:42 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331894
Sorry you feel that way merryfrankster.


The interference head should not cause heartache in a properly maintained vehicle.

When my captive rotors wore out, the bearings needed changing anyway, so no biggie there.

I've had the spark plug cover off numerous times changing plugs and never had concerns about it's or the valve covers longevity.

Window regulators fine.

Car is hammered to the limiter more often than it should be and has traversed some pretty ordinary roads here in OZ.

Theer is nothing microsoft like or out of the ordinary to report, I'm afraid. I do maintain it though, as I would any vehicle in my care.

I can understand ham fisted individuals mucking things up but they can do that to any vehicle. I guess rental cars, being the fastest cars in the world :grin: , cop more than their fair share of abuse from ham fisted, budget conscious types.

Cheers,

Andrew
Yes, you're right, Andrew, rental cars do get hammered, and our job here at Frank's Friendly Cars Maui Car Rental is to put them back together and get them back out there for more hammering, just like the King's Men do with Humpty Dumpty.

And, sigh, I must have been imagining things when I said that, based on my own extensive experience, the Hyundai Elantra 2G is more troublesome - costs more, takes longer - to fix up than comparable Toyotas, Hondas, and Suzukis, all of which get hammered just as equally by our customers. I take it back. I was lying. I was just plain wrong. And, all those TSB's on hmaservice.com, which remind me so much of the Microsoft Knowledge Base, otherwise known as the repository of the most shameful design flaws in the computer software world, I just dreamt them. They don't exist. And, even if they did, every other car has the same thing, if not worse.

Ok? Everybody happy now? Three cheers for Hyundai!
 
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