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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was under the impression that Hyundai's 5 year / 60,000 mile warranty was "bumper to bumper" on ALL parts and components but I see that some items have only 3/36k coverage and some items have only 1/12k coverage...

<div class='codetop'>CODE<div class='codemain' style='height:200px;white-space:pre;overflow:auto'>The following components are covered for time and mileage limits indicated:
• Radio and audio systems (i.e., radio, compact disc player, DVD player, navigation system, and Bluetooth®): 3 years/36,000 miles
• Paint: 3 years/36,000 miles
• Battery: 3 years/unlimited miles (100% covered 2 years/unlimited miles; after 2 years and within 3 years, 25% cost of battery and 100% labor cost covered)
• Air conditioner refrigerant charge: 1 year/unlimited miles
• Adjustments: 1 year/12,000 miles
• Wear items: 1 year/12,000 miles (e.g., belts, brake pads and linings, clutch linings, filters, wiper blades, bulbs, fuses)

Besides roadside assistance, what else is covered for the first 5 years/60k miles (not including powertrain, emissions, etc. that are covered under a 7,8, or 10 year warranty)?

For the majority of US auto makers that have 3 year/36,000 mile warranties, are those bumper to bumpers or do they have exclusions as well?
 

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Hyundai never actually claimed the warranty was bumper-to-bumper and in fact, I think they use the word 'limited' in several instances. I'm sure many other car companies have limits on things like bulbs and adjustments.
 

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QUOTE (lovemysantafe @ Oct 28 2010, 02:47 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=366885
Hyundai never actually claimed the warranty was bumper-to-bumper and in fact, I think they use the word 'limited' in several instances. I'm sure many other car companies have limits on things like bulbs and adjustments.
You are correct, this is directly from the Hyundai website:

5-YEAR/60,000-MILE NEW VEHICLE LIMITED WARRANTY

Covers repair or replacement of any component manufactured or originally installed by Hyundai that is defective in material or factory workmanship, under normal use and maintenance.

The following components are covered for time and mileage limits indicated:
• Radio and audio systems (i.e., radio, compact disc player, DVD player, navigation system, and Bluetooth®): 3 years/36,000 miles
• Paint: 3 years/36,000 miles
• Battery: 3 years/unlimited miles (100% covered 2 years/unlimited miles; after 2 years and within 3 years, 25% cost of battery and 100% labor cost covered)
• Air conditioner refrigerant charge: 1 year/unlimited miles
• Adjustments: 1 year/12,000 miles
• Wear items: 1 year/12,000 miles (e.g., belts, brake pads and linings, clutch linings, filters, wiper blades, bulbs, fuses)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's been a long while since I last purchased a new car so I don't remember how complete my warranty coverage was on my PT Cruiser. I'm guessing 3/36 but don't remember how they handled various issues 1 or 2 years in.

It's funny how so many people know Hyundai as having a 10/100 warranty but don't know the specifics of what's covered for 1, 3, 5, or 10 years.
 

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Hyundai doesn't attempt to hide anything in this regard. The exceptions are made completely clear in the owner's package that comes with your new vehicle. It's unfortunate that most people never open, let alone read the material in that little binder.

My experience, after just a few months at a Hyundai dealership, is that the company is very liberal when it comes to coverage.
 

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It has recently occurred to me that the problem comes from the dealerships themselves. Over the past 15 years and 8 vehicles, I remember hearing "bumper-to-bumper warranty" stated by the salespersons. In fact, it was the primary reason I even considered purchasing my first Hyundai after having significant issues with GM and seeing the crap my parents always put up with concerning Ford Motor Company. I have always known that it is limited, but I took this to mean that the sales and finance departments wanted to make it clear that consumables and regular maintenance are not coverend. I never realized (until today) that "limited warranty" was the proper term and "bumper-to-bumper warranty" was probably a easier term for everyone to use. They indicated in an email to me today, that they "would like to clarify that Hyundai Motor America does not and has never offered a "Bumper to Bumper" warranty on any of it's vehicles". This is VERY disappointing, and I must admit that their warranty has now fallen to 4 stars in my mind, but they are correct, and once again we have others (and our failure to read the supplied literature from cover to cover) to blame.

In the old days, radio frequency (RF) components which were used in automobiles were subject to degredation the more they were used. The digital components used today do not degrade near as quickly, but the mechanical parts of CD and DVD players are still very fragile, and dirt, dust, and the insertion of foreign objects will ALWAYS be an issue. Hyundai does not take apart components at the shop level to determine where the failures of these components has occurred. Most technicians don't have the skills or time to make a well-informed decision about the cause to that level. Instead, its more of a "swap-tronics" repair process (to pull from my avionics background). Knowing this, it makes more sense to me why they would limit the warranty, but not why they would accept that as the norm.

They don't fall from 5 to 4 stars because they upset me in any way, but because I think their warranty could certainly cover radios, DVD players, CD players, screens, and amplifiers for 5 years with a bit of a design change. If the mechanical portion of the CD/DVD drives was easily swappable in the shop, or if there were better diagnostics to tell you whether the issue is mechanical or electronic, they they could more easily exclude the mechanical portions and extend the warranty on the electronics. Hyundai could also go a bit further in explaining to the shops what types of failures they cover or do not cover. In my case, my 2013 Santa Fe has always had an issue in which occasionally the touch screen for the radio locks up and refuses to accept inputs. You either have to press the reset button and lose everything it holds in memory, or shut the car completely off for 5 minutes, restart, and watch it work like it should. Its getting worse with time, but since the shops can't duplicate it in the short time that they have the vehicle, they won't replace it. This falls under the 3 yr/36K miles limitation, but my extended warranty covers it, but again, no repair if they can't duplicate the behavior. If Hyundai explained that they would cover such an issue, since its obviously not a "dirty hands" or "scratch screen" issue, then I and probably many others would be much happier. I also feel that Hyundai really needs to find a way to cover the radios and screens better, since a failure of the screen means that there are other functions of the car that you can no longer access. This is even more applicable with my wife's 2017 Santa Fe Limited Ultimate, and it prevents them from having a 5 star warranty in my mind.

The other reason that their warranty falls from 5 to 4 stars, is because the shop also told me that the paint on the car is not covered for 5 yr/60K miles! One of the primary reasons that I will not buy another GM product, is because various models have a bad habit of their paint flaking off of the primer, which they refused to address. I've never seen a Hyundai with a bad paint job, though I'm sure it happens occasionally, but without at least a 5 year warranty on the paint, I also cannot give them 5 stars.

Each person must weight the pros and cons for themselves when determining if a manufacturer's warranty is suitable for them. For example, my parents would not care one little bit if the radio or screen quit working, but to a teenager or college student, the vehicle might as well not exist if it cannot play music. Also, read your extended warranty documents carefully and consider picking one which will make up for the manufacturer's short-comings.
 

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First, you are replying to a 7-year old thread.

Second - for MY16 onward, the 5-year warranty DOES include audio.

It has recently occurred to me that the problem comes from the dealerships themselves. Over the past 15 years and 8 vehicles, I remember hearing "bumper-to-bumper warranty" stated by the salespersons.
B2B is an industry standard term and shorter to say than "The B2B except the radio and battery warranty". And salespersons will say anything. I've usually had them mention the 10-year/100K warranty and not mention it was powertrain only.

OTOH, I had the opposite happen when I bought my car, the finance guy tried to sell me the extended warranty (3rd-party), b/c the radio was only covered for 3-years. (He was wrong, and a replacement Accent radio is $90 on E-bay - it would be different if it were a $1400 navi radio that can't be replaced with aftermarket.)

Lastly - a warranty is only as good as the company behind it. On my 2002 Focus, the dealer would often fix things I didn't know were broken under warranty (whether they fixed anything or just submitted the paperwork is questionable). There are posts on here that the dealers are paying 25% of the usual labor rate for warranty work. With that, there isn't a huge incentive to repair items under warranty if they don't have to do so.
 

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Typically the word "limited" is used or "exclusions apply" - and just like when you see the car advertisements for a low monthly payment the word "qualified buyers" and/or "see dealer for full terms and conditions", if in print an asterik in fine print shows details . So much the same with warranties- they don't hide or withhold anything but you may have to go to a second level to get all of the relevant details. And a prospective buyer should.
 

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...my 2013 Santa Fe has always had an issue in which occasionally the touch screen for the radio locks up and refuses to accept inputs. You either have to press the reset button and lose everything it holds in memory, or shut the car completely off for 5 minutes, restart, and watch it work like it should. Its getting worse with time, but since the shops can't duplicate it in the short time that they have the vehicle, they won't replace it. This falls under the 3 yr/36K miles limitation, but my extended warranty covers it, but again, no repair if they can't duplicate the behavior...
I have seen on other forums where a user will use his smart phone to make a video of the behavior that is problematic. Then they don't have to get it to malfunction--they can see how it has malfunctioned. In at least some of these cases, the dealer will then repair or replace.


...and to be fair, the thread is not quite seven years old. :)
 
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