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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll start:

2022 Tucson Hybrid blue trim
40.4mpg ave over the full tank
type of gas: unknown. dealer filled
type of driving: easy break-in miles. no interstate. mostly highway miles 55mph to 65 mph
 

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I tried to use fuelly once to keep track of my motorcycle mileage. It was such a pain I gave up. They demand all kinds of personal info and data that isn't necessary at all to tracking mileage. I finally moved on and just started a spreadsheet.
 

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It was such a pain I gave up. They demand all kinds of personal info and data that isn't necessary at all to tracking mileage.
All they require is an email address and a name, I used my email I use for SPAM and a nickname.

The only other info they required is vehicle info for obvious reasons, make, model, engine. Other things it asks for like VIN are option and don't have to be filled out, so you don't really have to give any personal info.
 

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I recommend everyone start a log at fuelly.org To date not a single 2022 has registered yet, but its the best online tool to keep track of your fuel usage over the life of your vehicle, and see what others are getting: Hyundai Tucson MPG - Actual MPG from 997 Hyundai Tucson owners
Fuelly hasn't added the 2022 Tucson to their database yet so no one can add it to their garages yet. Linked below is the request page. Having more people request it might get them to add it faster or it might annoy the admins to get so many requests for the same model.

 

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Here's someone's testing on YouTube:

That 28.3 MPG at 75mph isn't that impressive. Hoped it'd be better for road tripping. I guess that final gear in the 6-speed isn't tall enough

Other numbers:
40.6 mpg @ 56 mph
25 @ 87
46 mpg in the city in -1 C weather

The RAV4 got 33.6 MPG at that same speed:

A table comparing the Tucson HEV, Santa Fe HEV, and RAV4 HEVs:
 

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That Rav4 just looks overall more efficient, no matter the speed. I wonder if its because the Tucson is wearing regular sporty rubber and the Rav4 is on low rolling resistance tires?

If not, then it may just be the CVT proving its efficiency, but I would much rather have a more reliable and better feeling 6-speed DCT over CVTs that it seems like just about every manufacturer ends up having issues with and feel rather rubberbandy and can drone while accelerating.

Looks like that is also the limited, the Blue trim should kick that up a couple MPG as well. Either way, considering its a a fairly good size crossover and running on 87 octane, that's still pretty cheap to fuel. If you want to do a ton better at high speed, probably need to change class of vehicle anyway and look at a Sonata hybrid instead. They do up to 54mpg on the highway and are whisper quiet at speed thanks to low drag low teardrop shape.
 

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Here's someone's testing on YouTube:

That 28.3 MPG at 75mph isn't that impressive. Hoped it'd be better for road tripping. I guess that final gear in the 6-speed isn't tall enough

Other numbers:
40.6 mpg @ 56 mph
25 @ 87
46 mpg in the city in -1 C weather

The RAV4 got 33.6 MPG at that same speed:

A table comparing the Tucson HEV, Santa Fe HEV, and RAV4 HEVs:
Just a quick heads up, the tests were done around -9/-10 Celsius which is roughly 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Hybrids get terrible MPG in cold weather. Getting ~29MPG in cold weather is not bad. In summer/warmer weather you can see those numbers jump up quite significantly. My old Ford Escape hybrid used to drop by 9-10 MPG during the winter months.
 

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That Rav4 just looks overall more efficient, no matter the speed. I wonder if its because the Tucson is wearing regular sporty rubber and the Rav4 is on low rolling resistance tires?

If not, then it may just be the CVT proving its efficiency, but I would much rather have a more reliable and better feeling 6-speed DCT over CVTs that it seems like just about every manufacturer ends up having issues with and feel rather rubberbandy and can drone while accelerating.

Looks like that is also the limited, the Blue trim should kick that up a couple MPG as well. Either way, considering its a a fairly good size crossover and running on 87 octane, that's still pretty cheap to fuel. If you want to do a ton better at high speed, probably need to change class of vehicle anyway and look at a Sonata hybrid instead. They do up to 54mpg on the highway and are whisper quiet at speed thanks to low drag low teardrop shape.
The CVT in Toyota's hybrids isn't the standard belt style CVT. It uses a planetary gearset which has proven to be extremely reliable, probably because it's very mechanically simple. And also very efficient.

And no, I'm not considering a sedan.

Just a quick heads up, the tests were done around -9/-10 Celsius which is roughly 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Hybrids get terrible MPG in cold weather. Getting ~29MPG in cold weather is not bad. In summer/warmer weather you can see those numbers jump up quite significantly. My old Ford Escape hybrid used to drop by 9-10 MPG during the winter months.
That does make sense. The Daily Motor channel tested the current-gen Sonata HEV at around 74 MPH and got 47mpg but it wasn't a steady speed like in the cold weather test I linked above. Hopefully, they'll be able to test the Tucson HEV in warmer temperatures soon
 

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If not, then it may just be the CVT proving its efficiency, but I would much rather have a more reliable and better feeling 6-speed DCT over CVTs that it seems like just about every manufacturer ends up having issues with and feel rather rubberbandy and can drone while accelerating.
Are you sure that the 2022 Tucson Hybrid has a DCT in North America? I'm actually confused. From what I've gathered, it's a DCT in the Asian/European market and a normal 6-speed in North America. I have not seen a single North American review mention DCT. Plus this is the spec sheet from Hyundai Canada:
457437
 

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Are you sure that the 2022 Tucson Hybrid has a DCT in North America?
Nope, but the Ioniq hybrid has a 6-speed DCT that is often just called a "6-speed automatic", so I assumed it was that transmission used here too: product , passenger vehicle powertrain , HEV:DCT

Maybe its a regular automatic. I don't have anything against torque converters, and would be happy with that too. And for those that say "well this CVT is special, it doesn't use belts", well, that's what they said about the Kia's iVT and they are all crapping out anyway. Even Toyota with its innovative CVT with launch gear had a big recall on the Corollas after a bunch of them were grenading themselves at low mileage. Seems to be an immature technology.
 

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That Rav4 just looks overall more efficient, no matter the speed. I wonder if its because the Tucson is wearing regular sporty rubber and the Rav4 is on low rolling resistance tires?

If not, then it may just be the CVT proving its efficiency, but I would much rather have a more reliable and better feeling 6-speed DCT over CVTs that it seems like just about every manufacturer ends up having issues with and feel rather rubberbandy and can drone while accelerating.

Looks like that is also the limited, the Blue trim should kick that up a couple MPG as well. Either way, considering its a a fairly good size crossover and running on 87 octane, that's still pretty cheap to fuel. If you want to do a ton better at high speed, probably need to change class of vehicle anyway and look at a Sonata hybrid instead. They do up to 54mpg on the highway and are whisper quiet at speed thanks to low drag low teardrop shape.
We test drove the RAV4, CRV hybrid, Venza, and the Tucson Hybrid. The RAV4s have been flying off the lots - so we had to test drive a regular one. Ironically it was the most expensive vehicle out of all (40k) - and it rode like a $25k vehicle - I was NOT impressed. Came down to the Venza and the Tucson. The Tucson won - we are very happy.
 

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We considered the Venza, although looking at some reviews it’s supposedly smaller on the inside and not quite as quick. We weren’t able to find one to even see in person let alone test drive, and my wife wasn’t too fond of the RAV4. I didn’t think she’d like the Tucson but she did… and here we are.
 

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We considered the Venza, although looking at some reviews it’s supposedly smaller on the inside and not quite as quick. We weren’t able to find one to even see in person let alone test drive, and my wife wasn’t too fond of the RAV4. I didn’t think she’d like the Tucson but she did… and here we are.
That's funny - I didn't think my wife would like the Tucson either, but she loved it. The technology wasn't obtrusive to her, and the info-tanement screen being down on the dash instead of up in your face was good too.

The Venza was a nice ride - it had pep, but not like the Tucson. Toyota reports a combined 219 net HP on the Venza, but the gas engine is 176hp, while the turbo on the Hyundai gets it to 180hp. And the Tucson is just so much more unique - and the price was much more competitive than that of the Venza.

Now if I could just get the wireless charging pad to work with my Samsung...
 
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