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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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You're looking at the 2019 engines. Not the 2.5 and 2.5T 2021 engines.

*Models with HTCS: Smartstream 1.6 / 1.6 T-GDi / 2.0 GDi HEV / 2.0 T-GDi
No. 2019 engines are the 2.4 and 2.0T which are GDi only. If you scroll further you will see where it mentions the 2.5/2.5T are dual fuel injection and the 3.5 v6/turbo is dual fuel injection with center injection.

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2021 Stormy Sea Santa Fe Calligraphy 2.5L Turbo 8DCT HTRAC 20" wheels
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Yup, I see it now. I was looking at the center injection and for some reason didn't see that the other injector was into the manifold versus in the side cylinder. The pictures on the SmartStream site are a little confusing. My bad.
 

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Four cylinder turbo engines are Hyunkia's high failure rate engines. No thanks. When these new Smartstream engines age, then time will tell, concerning their success rates.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.4 L
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206 Posts
Parts fail. More frequent oil changes will help IMO and that's what our 19 SF Ultimate 2.4L will get. I expect to get over 100 K trouble free miles. The car runs great, doesn't burn oil and does well in our cold mountain temps. Seems I got a good one.
FYI
I use Castrol Edge and a Wix XP oil filter.
 

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2022 Santa Fe Calligraphy, Stormy Seas, Beige Interior
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Four cylinder turbo engines are Hyunkia's high failure rate engines. No thanks. When these new Smartstream engines age, then time will tell, concerning their success rates.
This is why that 2.0T engine is being phased out. My Optima turbo got a new engine from them that now has a lifetime warranty. So as long as they stand behind their product, then I'm fine giving them my money. Also, that is why their new turbos coming out have both MPI & GDI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I did some more digging. There was that one video floating around on youtube where there is some "master technician" who tore down the smart stream. (think its been referenced in some other threads here) So I watched and gathered from it there was some piston slap going on and this was causing oil to slip up past the sides of the piston and getting burned as a result leaving a whole whack of carbon build up on the tops of the pistons. He compared it with other pistons from different cars and it was prety aparent. And then there was another video of 2 korean guys (not sure if they are aflitated with Hyundai or not) talking that hyundai recognized this issue and their "fix" was to add some drain holes on the sides of the piston in an effort to redirect the oild back down. Engines built after May 2021 would include these newer pistons. Few months later another video from he "master technician" surfaces to see if this really solves the problem which he basically said enough to last through the warranty but expects it to continue burning oil. Also mentioned something regarding the top portion of the piston and the distance from the first ring were to close together and the issue with this is that the ring will be exposed to higher/direct heat and more sludge build up. He also points out that the skirts of the piston were redesigned as well to aid with oil direction, but noticed that there seems to be wearing more on one side indicating the piston slap. He then goes on to say, it doesn matter what piston you put in here, it shouldnt be slaping. His hypothesis on this was something about the block warping due to the alloys used in manufacturing or something to that nautre.

Dont know what to make of this. First off everything was in Korean, but had some english subs. All the youtube comments where in Korean. I tried google translating a few, and most seem to be complaining about Hyndai and their tactics. Not trying to scare anyone here who may have already puchased their cars, but I would say keep an eye on your oil levels. As a current owner of a '14 with the 2.4 GDI and 120,000KM (62k-ish miles), Im still on the original engine and have been wanting to replace the car. I love the SanteFe, really is the perfect size for our family. But I think Im gonna go and get a 19 Sorento with the 3.3 Lambda and the 8spd tranny. This particular KIA dealer has a claim that if you buy a used KIA from them, AND do all the regular service and maintenance with them, they will give you life time coverage on the engine/trans for as long as you own the car. From what I can tell the 3.3's are prety solid engines and the fuel economy from wha I gathered from their forums seems to be inline with what people are getting here on the 2.5T, but not as good as the NA especially with the 8spd...but I dont think cost per month in fuel will be that significant, guessing 50-70 bucks more difference. Bigger tank but theoreticaly should be able to get 1-3 more days before needing to fill up based on my driving habbits.

Any smart mechanically inclined peeps got an opinion ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Parts fail. More frequent oil changes will help IMO and that's what our 19 SF Ultimate 2.4L will get. I expect to get over 100 K trouble free miles. The car runs great, doesn't burn oil and does well in our cold mountain temps. Seems I got a good one.
FYI
I use Castrol Edge and a Wix XP oil filter.
I have also considered this is an option for me. I can get a pretty good deal on some slightly used ones. I guess Im just a bit gun shy considering the GDI history.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.4 L
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Buy what you think is right for you but the fact still remains nothing is perfect. Proven on my truck site. Trucks with the same driveline and this one is trouble free but this one burns oil or has a motor failure. Accept the fact that all the research doesn't guarantee a trouble free vehicle. It's a roll of the dice.
Edit
Go to any manufacturers forum and you can find motor problems. They all make bad ones.
 
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