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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently started hearing some squeaking noises when coming to a stop and reversing. Saw that all 4 of my rotors have surface rust. They’re all literally brown/copper colored. I know hybrids use regenerative braking but I managed to hard brake / put the car in neutral from 40-50MPh to a stop so the brakes activate but the rust is not coming off. I’m not sure if anyone else has similar issues? The dealership I go to is backed up for 3 weeks which sucks immensely.

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Are you talking about the rust around the cooling vanes on the inside of the rotor?

If so, how would you expect a hard stop to correct that (pads only come in contact with the outer surface of the rotor).

Brake rotors contain iron, and unless they’re sealed or painted (don’t paint your brake rotors, for the love of God), they will oxidize in the presence of moisture. What you’re showing is completely normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Are you talking about the rust around the cooling vanes on the inside of the rotor?

If so, how would you expect a hard stop to correct that (pads only come in contact with the outer surface of the rotor).

Brake rotors contain iron, and unless they’re sealed or painted (don’t paint your brake rotors, for the love of God), they will oxidize in the presence of moisture. What you’re showing is completely normal.
It’s hard to take a picture of the entire rotor surface without taking off the wheels due to the shape of my wheel. But it’s not the vanes, it’s the entire surface of my rotors which is brown (yes the part where the pads meet the rotors). I’ve never had the surface of my rotors brown after driving. Rust spots are much different than having the entire surface of the rotors copper colored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Omg rust on an exposed iron surface 🤬
So you’re telling me your entire rotor surface is brown all the time? I mean the part where the pads meet the rotors too? Then I think we both have bad Hyundai’s because I’ve never owned a car that has had the entire surface of the rotors rusted, that is driven every day.
 

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2022 Santa Fe PHEV Phantom Black Pearl
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May have been less noticeable on other cars (or less prevalent) due to wheel design, but you will have rust on rotors pretty quickly after you have been in contact with any sort of water. It's completely normal and doesn't affect braking as such.
If the car sits for longer the pads can 'sit' onto the rotors and make more of a squeal, but this is still normal, due to the nature of the cast iron rotor.
As I said, with newer open wheels where you can more visibly see the rotors you may see it more. Most people's reference is race cars or high performance cars that have carbon-ceramic disks which will not rust as they are carbon, however those cost thousands for a set of brakes, so not really an option on most cars.
 

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So you’re telling me your entire rotor surface is brown all the time? I mean the part where the pads meet the rotors too? Then I think we both have bad Hyundai’s because I’ve never owned a car that has had the entire surface of the rotors rusted, that is driven every day.
It's a rotor bro that is exposed iron. Iron + water=rust. Not sure why you're so concerned about it.
 

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They will also appear rusted the day after you wash it and park it in the garage. Happens to all brake rotors that I've been exposed to.
 

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It’s hard to take a picture of the entire rotor surface without taking off the wheels due to the shape of my wheel. But it’s not the vanes, it’s the entire surface of my rotors which is brown (yes the part where the pads meet the rotors). I’ve never had the surface of my rotors brown after driving. Rust spots are much different than having the entire surface of the rotors copper colored.
Were any of your previous cars hybrids? Unless you're driving like a maniac, a hybrid car's brake pads will rarely contact the rotors. A single 10 mph slowdown won't be enough to remove all of that surface rust.

When I traded in my previous car, a C-Max hybrid, it had over 100k miles on the factory brake pads and they were less than half worn.
 

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It’s not rust, it’s patina.
 

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Every vehicle I've ever owned with disc brakes will have rust on the rotors in humid weather when it sits idle for a short period of time. There really can't be rust left on the rotors braking surface after you've driven a few blocks, only discoloration as the pads will clean the rust off the rotor surface where contact occurs.
 

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If you are that worried about rust, then spend $4-6K and replace them with the Ceramic disc's that are used on high end sports cars.
 

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Every vehicle I've ever owned with disc brakes will have rust on the rotors in humid weather when it sits idle for a short period of time. There really can't be rust left on the rotors braking surface after you've driven a few blocks, only discoloration as the pads will clean the rust off the rotor surface where contact occurs.
OP mentioned he is driving a Hybrid. Unless you are braking harshly you will regularly not use the brake pads to slow the vehicle (or only on the last few yards) as the regenerative system will brake the car for you.
It's very possible that the brakes will rust and look bad in this instance.
 
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