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Discussion Starter #1
My 2020 Santa Fe 2.4L (SEL) has 2,400 miles. This evening, it began driving a little "jerky" when leaving a stop light/sign, or slowing down to a stop. At idle, I could feel the engine vibrating.

These symptoms reminded me of how my 2015 Sonata Limited started acting at about 80,000 miles, when it began consuming (burning) oil. (It finally suffered full engine failure at 150,000 and was traded in for this Santa Fe.)

With the Sonata in mind, I pulled over and checked the engine oil in the Santa Fe. It was full last week, but tonight was down to halfway between the two marks on the dip-stick. (Top mark = "full". What does the bottom mark indicate?)

So I added about a pint of oil, and the car began driving and idling smoothly again.

QUESTION #1: Is it normal for a new 2019/2020 to consume oil during the first couple thousand miles?

The dealer sales person told me the oil is full synthetic, and the first change is not needed until 7,500 miles. (First 6 oil changes are free there)

QUESTION: #2: Should I, or should I not change the oil before 7,500 miles?

Thanks in advance for your experience-based advice!

-Allen in Chicagoland
 

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I don't see any correlation for a new engine being a pint or so low on oil to make your SF drive jerky and vibrate at idle. New engines do have some break in period for rings to seal and seals to seal so some oil consumption was the normal on older engines. Not sure this is as true with modern ones though. Also, an old rule of thumb which may not apply anymore was that you should change that factory fill of oil at around 1500 miles to flush out any debris from the new engine machining process. There is no harm in changing it early, peace of mind. No engine has ever been harmed from doing an oil / filter change too early.
 

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Keep an eye on the Oil level." Personally i would not waite until 7.500 miles for next oil change as mentioned by bdhal385 cant agree more there are always some minute machining process debris & assembly lubes used on the cam shafts & seals used for the initial 1st dry start of the engine left over in the engine from the factory although the factory fill oil is higher in molybeduimiun - aditive i would definatley still change it out after 2-3 km's & only use a Quality Synthetic oil & Filter there after
 

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I haven't noticed the consumption of oil in my 2019 built in May. I have close to 8k miles, I swapped out the oil before 4k and switched to SuperTech Full Syn. I plan to still change around every 5k miles. I've had some randomly transmission jerkiness but I drive slow and I don't feel the 8 speed likes my style of driving. I get somewhat of the same thing in my GF's Chrysler 200 with 9sp. Although as i've put on more miles it seems to happen lest often but that could be that i've learned the sweet spot.
 

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The jerky ride is not from the low oil since your oil level was still okay.
Now, if your oil was at full and now it was low after 2500 miles, then it seems like it is either burning oil or leaking. The latter should be easy to check. I will get an oil change at 5K miles at the dealer and keep an eye on the oil.
Seems like you are not having the best of luck with the Theta II engines.
 

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Get rid of the factory snake oil and replace it with a quality full synthetic and you should notice a big difference.
 

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I assume OP checked the oil level in the same setup. I.e. level will be different if checked first thing in the morning before running vs. right after ignition off.
I changed the oil half way of the scheduled maintenance interval.
People mentioned metal debris created from the first start etc, but they will be trapped in the oil filter or sank to the bottom of the oil pan.
 

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Many of the newer engines with ISG (or auto stop/start) have mechanisms in place to keep oil up in the engine for a short time once the engine stops. Not like the older engines where it all drains to the oil pan immediately when the engine stops. With Idle Stop/Go technology, one would expect the engine is designed to keep oil (lubrication) up in the engine longer, so if one checks the oil level right after the engine stops, it is likely the dipstick will read a bit "low" on oil. With the frequent stop/start of the engine, keeping it well lubricated is the best way to keep it from wearing (most wear occurs when the engine is cold started and all the oil is in the oil pan). It is best to check oil after the vehicle has been off or stopped for a period of time (at least 15 minutes) as rambokid states. First thing in the morning, on a level surface is best. Otherwise, one might end up over filling the oil level. It is a common issue on Ford EcoBoost engines with the Auto Stop/Start feature. And something to think about when using the local Grease Monkey or quick oil change spot in town. Need to give the motor a few minutes to fully drain and most of these places try to get you in and out as quickly as possible - if you use them, make sure they let it fully drain.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to everyone for your replies, advice and experiences. I went back to the dealer to ask when I should get my first oil change. The salesman told me 10,000 miles. The service technician told me 3,500 miles.

I'll go with the Service Tech's advice! He said the 2020 Santa Fe's come with Full Synthetic oil, so after the 3,500 oil change, I should get them at 7,500 mile intervals thereafter.

I have 3,050 on the car right now and drive about 100 miles @ day. So the 3,500 change will be next week. (Dealer does the first 6 changes for free.)

As for the occasional choppy driving and coasting when under 20mph, I think it may be a glitch in the transmission control software. It will be driving choppy. I go into the store for a few items. Come out, restart the car and it drives OK. Some drive cycles are choppy, some are smooth. Hopefully the car will be in a choppy cycle when I go for the first oil change.

Thanks again everyone! 🍺

-Allen in Chicagoland
 

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Thanks to everyone for your replies, advice and experiences. I went back to the dealer to ask when I should get my first oil change. The salesman told me 10,000 miles. The service technician told me 3,500 miles.

I'll go with the Service Tech's advice! He said the 2020 Santa Fe's come with Full Synthetic oil, so after the 3,500 oil change, I should get them at 7,500 mile intervals thereafter.

I have 3,050 on the car right now and drive about 100 miles @ day. So the 3,500 change will be next week. (Dealer does the first 6 changes for free.)

As for the occasional choppy driving and coasting when under 20mph, I think it may be a glitch in the transmission control software. It will be driving choppy. I go into the store for a few items. Come out, restart the car and it drives OK. Some drive cycles are choppy, some are smooth. Hopefully the car will be in a choppy cycle when I go for the first oil change.

Thanks again everyone! 🍺

-Allen in Chicagoland
That salesman needs a kick in the groin. You should mention his crazy oil change advice to the dealership owner. Of course, the salesman could be his son.
 

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Here is a funny thing about dealer services. A company I worked for had service contracts with dealer. We would make an appointment with service department and bring the vehicle in for service. This would occur 3 or 4 times a year depending on miles due to the way the contract worked. When the service contract ran out we had to take the vehicle to an authorized service center which was a place around the corner from the business. I got a call one day while in the office from the ASC asking me if the oil filter was ever changed. It turned out the dealer either had a factory colored filter for the oil service or never changed the filter. I said I really didn't know something of the sort. IIRC, this was about 14 years ago now, I relayed this to my boss who promptly moved it up the food chain. Long story short, it turned out the dealership's tech was literally changing the oil and not the filter on the vehicle. He was supposedly fired as well as one of the service advisers. The ownership of the company I worked for were not forthcoming with what was covered in the service contact. Supposedly the service contract was written in such a way it could have meant an oil change only no filter. Honestly, i think they were a bit embarrassed by it since I believed it was a ton of money they paid for this service and they of all people got duped. I left the company a few months after that fiasco as well as a few other people I knew there at the time.

I would be careful of any place offering a free service for either a number of times or for a term limit of lets say 2 years. Dropping new oil and putting in new oil it costing them a bare minimum wage employee for 10 minutes and someone who is making more than min wage plus commission employee to print paperwork. The oil cost is minimal pursue` of that total cost because of bulk purchasing. Filter cost more money eating into their profits. Oil changes are generally a loss leader for service departments meant to drum up more business. They will make some money not nothing like they would normal make on other jobs like brakes or other service work. Remember they don't put "A" techs on oil changes. They put the rookies on those tickets. Some dealers work on piece work pricing. If the book only give .25 hours for an oil change you better bet that oil change will be done in 5 minutes because that tech want to move on to the next ticket to make money. Frankly, I am usually leary about going to a service departments as more things may have changed, more they seem to have remained the same.

This may not be something new to some on the board but just a warning for others who are.
 
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