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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This fluid change is the same for 2017,2018 and 2019 models! Not applicable for 2020 since it uses an IVT transmission.

I tried to be as detailed as possible and kept my explanations simple with minimal use of time! Let me know if I missed out anything :)

More details to follow in the Video. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

I did read that few people were able to remove the Fill bolt without filling the side of it. I was unable to do so and I did not want to apply force and break the plastic plug, hence I had to file inorder to remove it.

UPDATES/FOLLOWUPS is pinned in the YouTube comments section! Cheers! :)

The Video

 

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Enjoyed watching. You have magic fingers and loved the thumbs up. I liked the way video was edited and pictures were very clear. Based on what I saw I will be having the dealership change mine. Thanks!
 

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Takes 7.08 US quarts of Hyundai Genuine ATF SP-Ⅳ fluid. Web prices seem to be around 12-13 bucks a quart, but shipping is more than that.

SP-IV has a lot more friction modifiers than SP-3, finding other brands of SP-4 or IV if you lived in ancient Rome, but from bad experiences with other brands of ATF, Would stick strictly with the Hyundai Brand.

Know guys that used other than Honda or Toyota ATV ran into severe seal leakage problem plus rough shifting. Not sure about Hyundai, but not willing to take the risk. May save a couple of bucks, but a new transmission would really set you back.

Ha, had an Olds 98, first fully production hydramatic that all the internal parts cost 80 buck and ATF was like a quarter a quart, this is ancient history.

What really confuses me is when it should be replaced, according to the manual 60K miles if driving severe, like slowly on a gravel road with dust, dust proof anyway, or none sever at 160K miles.

So far not a problem driving sanely a compact car to save the world on fuel usage, seem to get rear ended by a drunk driving a huge SUV that totals these vehicles. Other vehicles would be a pile of rust after seven years with tons of road salt.

No dip stick, used to check the color, always a bright red but when turning brown, time to replace it. Maybe better not to have a dipstick, air can leak in with moisture.

One thing nice about the Elantra, AT fluid level is checked hot, top plug should drip out. Other vehicles check cold, if your dealer does it, opens the top plug when hot, it pours out, and they leave it that way, so you are running low.
 

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Also go to a good transmission shop and find out what they will charge. If they are a good shop, they will use the exactly correct fluid, and they will probably do a better job than the dealer.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Takes 7.08 US quarts of Hyundai Genuine ATF SP-Ⅳ fluid. Web prices seem to be around 12-13 bucks a quart, but shipping is more than that.

SP-IV has a lot more friction modifiers than SP-3, finding other brands of SP-4 or IV if you lived in ancient Rome, but from bad experiences with other brands of ATF, Would stick strictly with the Hyundai Brand.

Know guys that used other than Honda or Toyota ATV ran into severe seal leakage problem plus rough shifting. Not sure about Hyundai, but not willing to take the risk. May save a couple of bucks, but a new transmission would really set you back.

Ha, had an Olds 98, first fully production hydramatic that all the internal parts cost 80 buck and ATF was like a quarter a quart, this is ancient history.

What really confuses me is when it should be replaced, according to the manual 60K miles if driving severe, like slowly on a gravel road with dust, dust proof anyway, or none sever at 160K miles.

So far not a problem driving sanely a compact car to save the world on fuel usage, seem to get rear ended by a drunk driving a huge SUV that totals these vehicles. Other vehicles would be a pile of rust after seven years with tons of road salt.

No dip stick, used to check the color, always a bright red but when turning brown, time to replace it. Maybe better not to have a dipstick, air can leak in with moisture.

One thing nice about the Elantra, AT fluid level is checked hot, top plug should drip out. Other vehicles check cold, if your dealer does it, opens the top plug when hot, it pours out, and they leave it that way, so you are running low.
Hi Nicholas,
I respect your opinion. But i'd like to add a few points.

I have read 100s of articles regarding Transmission Fluids and how they work. Why? I lost my 2001 Honda civic because of transmission failure. When I bought the car at 153k miles, I did not know anything about transmission maintenence/any other general maintenance. But today I am happy to do all the basic fluid maintenance on my Elantra on my own.It is in Top notch condition at 33k miles and I have not taken it to a dealer even once except for the 30k miles inspection. :)

In my opinion, Good transmission fluids - Amsoil, Redline, OEM, Castrol or other reputed brands do not cause any kind of problems as long as it is compatible with the manufacturer's specifications. But one has to understand the difference in viscosity. A multi-vehicle ATF cannot be compatible with all ATFs. Every manufacturer once used thicker fluids and now use thinner viscosity fluids. If you see an ATF brand that claims to be compatible with both Thicker and Thinner viscosity fluids, then think twice. :D One has to do good research before choosing a product other than OEM. :)

Seals would leak if the transmission has not been serviced for a long time. Ex - Lets say we have a neglected transmissions at 100/120k miles. Suddenly you use a fluid like Amsoil/Redline which have higher detergents that clean all the junk. You can obviously expect leaks as the old transmission fluid inside is fried and the seals are already worn out. This is just one factor to consider. There are so many other factors to consider why a transmission leaks. It is not just the fluid alone. All the above mentioned reputed brands do a lot of testing before they are out in the market.

Please post links/resources where a transmission shifted roughly/leaked when the fluid was changed at 60k miles or less and within 5 years of the age of the fluid. Remember, no fluid is lifetime. Even time can weaken the properties of ATF, not just the miles the tranny has put. I look forward to the links/articles. :)

Also, I changed my ATF out at 30k miles. The fluid was actually dirty and I did not expect that. So much of break-in materials was suspended inside the fluid. I have done a lot of highway driving which is why I did not expect to see that. I would recommend everyone to do at-least one drain/fill (Safest way in my opinion) every 30k miles to keep your ATF rejuvenated of additives and to keep it clean. Doing this will definitely not harm anything. ha ha. My simple logic is to keep the ATF fluid clean/rejuvenated and let it not be affected by heat. I'd want my ATF fluid to beat the heat. And when it comes to beating the heat, 100% synthetics like Amsoil and Redline that use PAO base / Ester base are the best! :)
 

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This fluid change is the same for 2017,2018 and 2019 models! Not applicable for 2020 since it uses an IVT transmission.

I tried to be as detailed as possible and kept my explanations simple with minimal use of time! Let me know if I missed out anything :)

More details to follow in the Video. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

I did read that few people were able to remove the Fill bolt without filling the side of it. I was unable to do so and I did not want to apply force and break the plastic plug, hence I had to file inorder to remove it.

UPDATES/FOLLOWUPS is pinned in the YouTube comments section! Cheers! :)

The Video

This fluid change is the same for 2017,2018 and 2019 models! Not applicable for 2020 since it uses an IVT transmission.

I tried to be as detailed as possible and kept my explanations simple with minimal use of time! Let me know if I missed out anything :)

More details to follow in the Video. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

I did read that few people were able to remove the Fill bolt without filling the side of it. I was unable to do so and I did not want to apply force and break the plastic plug, hence I had to file inorder to remove it.

UPDATES/FOLLOWUPS is pinned in the YouTube comments section! Cheers! :)

The Video

I have seen lots of information on the internet regarding transmission drain & refills but nothing on how to do a complete flush on a 6th gen Elantra. Transmissions typically have to be drained and refilled at least 3 times before most of the old oil is removed. I spent some time working on this and found the hose with the red mark on it that runs from the transmission to the oil cooler/warmer is the trans fluid "out" line. After the initial dump and refill, I disconnect this hose and installed a long piece of 3/8 i.d. hose and ran it to a drain pan. (I used a long section of hose so I could place the drain pan by the driver's door so I could observe fluid flow from the drivers seat.) After turning on the engine, I noticed lots of old black fluid flowing out of the hose. Once it started to spit, I immediately shut off the engine. I measured the amount of old fluid that was pumped out (about 3-1/2 quarts) so I refilled with the same amount of new fluid and restarted the engine then turned it off after I noticed clean fluid pumping out. I then replaced the same amount of fluid that was pumped out again, disconnected my drain line and reconnected the cooler line, ran the trans to 130 degrees and checked for proper level. I believe this saved some time and was able to flush out more, if not all, of the old fluid out than I would have by draining and refilling multiple times.
447319
447320
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have seen lots of information on the internet regarding transmission drain & refills but nothing on how to do a complete flush on a 6th gen Elantra. Transmissions typically have to be drained and refilled at least 3 times before most of the old oil is removed. I spent some time working on this and found the hose with the red mark on it that runs from the transmission to the oil cooler/warmer is the trans fluid "out" line. After the initial dump and refill, I disconnect this hose and installed a long piece of 3/8 i.d. hose and ran it to a drain pan. (I used a long section of hose so I could place the drain pan by the driver's door so I could observe fluid flow from the drivers seat.) After turning on the engine, I noticed lots of old black fluid flowing out of the hose. Once it started to spit, I immediately shut off the engine. I measured the amount of old fluid that was pumped out (about 3-1/2 quarts) so I refilled with the same amount of new fluid and restarted the engine then turned it off after I noticed clean fluid pumping out. I then replaced the same amount of fluid that was pumped out again, disconnected my drain line and reconnected the cooler line, ran the trans to 130 degrees and checked for proper level. I believe this saved some time and was able to flush out more, if not all, of the old fluid out than I would have by draining and refilling multiple times. View attachment 447319 View attachment 447320
Excellent! Well done :)
By doing this, I think you did get most of the fluid out!

But when you pumped 3.5 quarts out initially, technically you were running the transmission dry. I hope that was fine.
In my opinion, you have to pump out 1 quart at a time and put back one quart. That way you will not run the tranny dry. This is what I feel, I may be wrong. :)

But then again, thank you for the post. :)
 

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If you drain and fill every 30k the fluid doesn't get so bad that a flush is needed.
I do the same with coolant: do a D & F early. Much quicker and simpler than flush.
 

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Yes absolutely. :)
Also, even if it takes more time to a 2/3 drain and fill procedures, you don't have to be very careful. Its easy to do.
Wonder what would happen if you put Liqui-Moly Ceratec in it. They said you can but not in transmissions with wet clutches. Something I'm still confused about because all of them are basically wet due to fluids. But I guess wet clutches uses a totally different type of fluid? Idk but mines can use it but I haven't tried it yet till my fluids get replaced at some point. I did see someone ask can they use it their motorcycle and the business said no because it uses a wet clutch.
 

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Vast majority of drivers around here slam on the gas pedal only to slam on the brake pedal at the next stop sign. Keep up with them or even pass them without wrecking my investment. Driven vehicles over 300K miles without any major problem, even over 200K without changing transmission fluid. Another little trick is when stopped, slip it into neutral, those torque converters get red hot when stalled. Heavy on the gas pedal is another form of extra heat to turn your fluid black.

Just saying a lot depends on how you treat your car. One key reason why I don't want to purchase a used up vehicle.

Ha, a lot of people don't take care of their bodies either, drinking, smoking, eating junk food. Automotive trying to save 20 pounds with an aluminum head on their engines while the drivers have an extra 200 pounds on their guts and butts.
 

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Wonder what would happen if you put Liqui-Moly Ceratec in it. They said you can but not in transmissions with wet clutches. Something I'm still confused about because all of them are basically wet due to fluids. But I guess wet clutches uses a totally different type of fluid? Idk but mines can use it but I haven't tried it yet till my fluids get replaced at some point. I did see someone ask can they use it their motorcycle and the business said no because it uses a wet clutch.
Since I have limited technical expertise to answer the question experience tells me when in doubt stick with Hyundai's or the manufacturer's recommendations. Less variables means less issues.
 

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Since I have limited technical expertise to answer the question experience tells me when in doubt stick with Hyundai's or the manufacturer's recommendations. Less variables means less issues.

According to the shop manual these are the recommended AT fluids.

"SK ATF SP-Ⅳ, MICHANG ATF SP-Ⅳ,NOCA ATF SP-Ⅳ, Hyundai Genuine ATF SP-Ⅳ", use another kiss your warranty goodbye, but I never had an AT warranty problems.

ATF quantity is "6.7L(1.77 U.S gal., 7.08 U.S.qt., 5.90 Imp.qt.)"
 

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Since I have limited technical expertise to answer the question experience tells me when in doubt stick with Hyundai's or the manufacturer's recommendations. Less variables means less issues.
Yeah believe me when it comes to the transmissions, I won't even touch that. They can lol
 

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The "shifting mechanism" as it's been called is what Hyundai calls an "Inhibitor Switch". Here's the steps for removal, in case you don't want to file the fill plug.

1. Ignition on engine off, put vehicle in Neutral
2. Turn ignition off and disconnect the negative battery cable
3. Remove the air cleaner assembly and air duct
4. Disconnect the Inhibitor Switch connector (A )
5. Remove the shift cable mounting nut (B) (installation - torque to 7.2-10.1 lb-ft)
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6. Remove the manual control lever and the washer after removing a nut (A) (installation - torque to 13-18.1 ft-lb)
7. Remove the Inhibitor Switch after removing the bolts (B) (installation - torque to 7.2-8.7 lb-ft)
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Installation is the reverse of removal. Ensure that the the shift lever is in Neutral. See parenthesis for torque settings.
 
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