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Just bought an AEM Cold air intake system. After looking at YouTube videos I now have cold feet about putting it in my car. First off because not much horsepower gains compared to a K-N high-performance filter which is a third of the price. Secondly my car just turned 9000 miles. I plan on keeping it for a long time and with today’s engines as complexed as computers can be. I’m worried this cold air intake systems may cause problems. I feel It may cause idling or acceleration problems down the road. Any thoughts from anyone would help?
 

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I never had one but what I have read here and other forums is that the filtering if not as good as the regular ones. Does not catch smaller particles as well as the regular filter!
 

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^^ What @Turbonut said. These cars have a CAI(cold air intake) already, and most likely you bought a SRI(short ram intake). When the filter is open in the engine bay, it gets heat soaked and pulls in hot air. The intake stock on the car does get heat soak but can only pull air from the front of the car which is "cold air." The benefit to an SRI is that the airflow path is usually smoother than stock that has ribs and therefore can flow better, however the suction induced from the engine and turbo can easily overcome that. You will notice more engine and turbo noise with aftermarket since it isn't as closed off. If it is a true CAI that only allows air from outside to get to the filter then you may see marginal hp gains but without a tuning chip or re-tune of the ecu, the engine will only benefit slightly from the more available air by increasing fuel.
 

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+1 on what has been said. The AEM is a short ram setup and you will then be pulling "hot" air directly from under the hood (engine compartment) also the overall filter is no better than what you have.

The stock A/C is a cold air as it draws from the front. Granted it is not the smoothest or most fluid path but the only gains you will get are more intake noise and IMO a placebo effect.

Adding a K&N to the stock air box will reduce resistance but at a loss of filtering quality. There is a lot of info on "foam" filter vs paper and the filtering media in the pare OEM are usually more efficient. Plus its a lot easier to just drop a new filter in than to pull the foam and clean and reoil.
 

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Just bought an AEM Cold air intake system. After looking at YouTube videos I now have cold feet about putting it in my car. First off because not much horsepower gains compared to a K-N high-performance filter which is a third of the price. Secondly my car just turned 9000 miles. I plan on keeping it for a long time and with today’s engines as complexed as computers can be. I’m worried this cold air intake systems may cause problems. I feel It may cause idling or acceleration problems down the road. Any thoughts from anyone would help?
Well, they look cool. :D
 

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I feel the '18-'19 factory intake system chokes the air off by forcing it to draw through those tiny slots in the upper radiator cover.
I'm looking for a CAI design that is routed forward then turns outward across the front of the battery and dips down into the cavity behind the left-side DRL, using the vertical outboard air diverter scoop for ram induction. Air would be isolated from engine temp, be cleaner, and there's more room for a more efficient filter.
 

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CAI is a marketing term. Its a free-flow air filter system.

Enjoy the AEM since you already bought it. There is more to an intake than peak power gains. Area under curve improvements, throttle response, turbo lag.... all should improve when you reduce engine pumping losses and free up either the intake/exhaust restrictions.

Pulleys, throttle body, exhaust, and tuning are other options.
 

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id say go for it. Improves throttle response on my 2019. Also to me its more free flowing. Anyone that has a turbo car that is driving the piss out of it in 95 degrees anyways should buy another car.
 

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Anyone that has a turbo car that is driving the piss out of it in 95 degrees anyways should buy another car.
Why?

Ive owned 2 turbo 4 cyl cars (MBZ C 250 and Sonata 2.0T) and on the C250 put over 140,000 miles on it in less than 5 yr and my Sonata is 2.5 yr old with 70,000+ on it. I live in the high desert area of So Cal and 6-9 months of the year it is 90 -105 degrees and I have not experienced any difference from any of my other normal aspirated cars, 4x4, trucks or MC.

Also I drive fairly "spirited", manual shift with paddles is norm, rpm on acceleration 5000 +, average hwy speeds 75 -90 mph
 

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. Anyone that has a turbo car that is driving the piss out of it in 95 degrees anyways should buy another car.
No sure why you would think that. Ive had several turbo 4s, a turbo 6 and several turbo diesel trucks. Never had an issue even when they were used for severe duty. At the temperature modern engines run at, whats a few more degrees really going to matter. 95 to 102 here for months each year.
 

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I guess maybe i have had different experiences. But i will tell you the ECU of your car is most likely de-tuning aka less boost not maximized performance. when the air is that hot that its sucking in. Just an FYI i have seen people had to replace there turbos over this. For instance do you ever leave the car in drive and just boost or do you manually drop gears?
 

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Ive checked engine parameters a few times a year to see true engine, trans temps, boost, 0-60 times, mpg etc using my OBD adapter and either Dash Command or OBD Fusion and there has never been any change in boost regardless of the time of year or temps.

If 10-20 degrees of outside air temps made any noticeable difference on a stock production turbo 4 cyl "family sport sedan" then their would be a big decrease in performance using the "short ram intake" that some have installed since it is pulling "hot" air from inside the engine bay (with the hood closed and engine at temp the air under the hood is 180-200 + degrees https://forums.edmunds.com/discussion/2395/general/x/underhood-temperatures ) vs the stock setup pulling air from under the front of the hood near the grille.
 

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Has anyone measured the intake air temperature and compared the free-flow pod to the factory box?
 

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With a turbo the intercooler is there to reduce the intake air temp. A few degrees pre turbo isn't much compared to the heat of compression from the exhaust driven turbo.

Do you even know what your IATs are and how much they climb when under boost?

That being said a turbo defiantly benefits from a more open exhaust and intake.
 

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Far too many people aren't seeing the big picture here on the InJen type of SRI setup (which I have).

They DO get cooler air at speed (read "highway driving") from the OEM snorkel directly getting cooler outside (non-engine bay) air and directing it right to the SRI intake filter. While you are sitting in traffic, yes you are getting only the hotter 'inside the engine bay' air but while driving at speed, it is the cooler outside air getting to your SRI air filter. That's a good thing.

The bigger benefit often not discussed concerning the SRI type of intakes is in the removal of some of the flow restrictions by using smooth, mandrel bend piping and other tricks to remove/reduce turbulent air flow which does help for the turbo's intake and ultimately makes more power. That include freeing flowing air filters as well. Is this a lot of extra power? Maybe 15 HP or so for some of these systems (see their dyno sheets). Yes, they do look "cool" and you will hear more of the air "swooshing" sound/turbo spool when getting on it. I use the Hydroshield on the filter to help keep water out as well.

You have to decide if the cost/benefit is worth your using them.
 

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You got any 1/4 mile times with your tune yet?
Sorry, I don't. I don't go to the drag track with my car. It's my daily driver. Several folks have and they report it on FB on the various Optima/Sonata groups. Take a look there.
 

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Sorry, I don't. I don't go to the drag track with my car. It's my daily driver. Several folks have and they report it on FB on the various Optima/Sonata groups. Take a look there.
Meh ours is a daily driver too ,i was just curious. I take the mustang periodically as its a trailer car and my wife brought the Sonata, i was like wth. lol It barely broke into the 13s.13.94 IIRC. It really needs an LSD to go further. My GT V6 did a 14.0 but its a heavy pig with all the reinfocement steel for the drop top., it has a few mods but nothing serious other than exhaust and LSD. So it seems about right for a 93 octane tune. I was satisfied for what I have in it. Not going to mess with the methanol. The Mustang really fills my need for speed, but this isnt a N20 injected Ford mustang forum.
 
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