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Yes, under a microscope, along with lab particle counts. DI=massive soot producer. That is the benefit of working for a massive organization with enough equipment to scare away most of the younger soyboy generation or clueless head in ground crowd seen on forums often enough. We have our own labs with billions spent in industrial equipment. All of the younger lattefrapuchino hairbun overly pierced overly tattooed bong smokers don't last a week after hiring. Most are too stupid and seriously indoctrinated into their own ignorance. Average worker age here is pretty high because employer demand is not for the faint of heart. There is a difference between a diyer and DIYr, and its big.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Answering some more comments here:

"A better filter will help trap the carbon deposits and keep the oil cleaner longer.
The Wix XP filters have a good reputation on this board."

I have noticed that in my experience, and heard the comment of this engine being happiest on the OE filter actually. In the case of the current OCI, I currently have a purolator boss on the car, said it was rated for 15,000 miles on the box, honestly i never gave the filter much thought, though usually when i purchase the oil, the store will have a special on a name brand filter (be it a wix, purolator, etc...heard misgivings over fram so iffy there) and usually ill pick up whatever name is on sale. My own knowledge of automotive was taught to stick with major brand names, typically wont blow anything up and have reputation behind whatever it is you buy.

"...OP, its not that the Mobil 1 oil you used isnt good, its that you want the least amount of volatility to keep the most oil out of the gases recirculating in the engine. Even within their product line volatility will vary...."

This I did not think of, running standard mobil 1 seemed fine to me on a 30,000 mile car, even so, i've saw,read some info in the past about using "high mileage" blends on a newer car or a vehicle that doesnt necessarily need it can be detrimental. This is because those blends tend to swell seals, if there is a reason it is changed with more conventional blends later, the seals can then contract and start to cause trouble. I do notice the oil gets dark quickly due to carbon in the oil, but it doesnt seem to be affecting the oil in my opinion. In fact, the whole reason I went to synthetic was the condition of dino after 5000 miles in this engine.
 

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Evidence? Look at your dipstick, dipstick

And, it is common sense. Too bad its not so common anymore.
 
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The fact that the system recirculates all the gases and oil etc that gets volatilized in the crankcase during operation and dumps it on the top of the valves is common knowledge for all modern engines. ON GDI only vehicles the carbon build up will happen faster if not controlled or cleaned regularly. The people currently sueing Hyundai say this carbon buildup breaks off in the combustion chamber or on top of the valves and gets between the piston and cylinder walls, then makes the cylinder wear out of round causing ring wear and ultimately dropping down into oil etc. In the suit, i believe they are saying these pieces get into the the oil passages and restrict flow to the crank causing failure.



Personally I do not buy that. It doesnt fit my knowledge of engines ive built , rebuilt, raced and rebuilt again over my lifetime.. I just do not see any significant carbon particles in the crankcase or in my oils even though, sure, there is a little more soot with GDI.. What i do see is a lot of is fuel dilution with the GDI. Due to soot particles and fuel dilution, i will never go longer than 5k miles on oil change for a GDI motor regardless of how good the oil is. This is all of course just my opinion.


OP, its not that the Mobil 1 oil you used isnt good, its that you want the least amount of volatility to keep the most oil out of the gases recirculating in the engine. Even within their product line volatility will vary. The extended life is one of the better ones in my experience. It definitely does not fix this particular issue with GDI. but It will result in less build up on top of the valves and less oil loss. Catch cans are another relatively cheap way to reduce this carbon build up but will not affect oil loss.
You are describing conditions more like an engine that is already a wreck, and probably not one at 30,000 miles.
 

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You are describing conditions more like an engine that is already a wreck, and probably not one at 30,000 miles.



My GNs treated me well enough for 12 years and my eclipse gt vert indeed has 240k miles on it and still takes me everywhere i want to go every summer. This is not my first Theta II 2.0T either. GDI, Forced induction, higher compression ratios etc are going to generate certain issues that must be mitigated for long term reliability. It only makes sense to do what you can.



Anyway, I am not a mechanic by trade. I was very clear that what I said is my opinion. Your opinion is, yours. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Not sure if bad news,

After reading replies here earlier, I was private messaged by someone mentioning a sizzling sound in their engine bay at load, I noticed mine does this, but only at high rpm, basically redline, normal loads, even with the pedal floored do not produce this noise...I was told it is pinging from oil cooking off the engine, not sure if that is true or not, but now has me getting paranoid. Originally, I simply thought this noise was the plastic intake or similar heaving or moving with the engine (this engine does like to dance a bit under the hood).

This evening is rather warm, after driving home from work, I decided to pop the hood and look things over.oil level is okay, and I was curious to the engine's blowby, based on the horror stories. I don't recall it being this strong, but maybe my memory isn't clear. I removed the oil cap and started the engine. To start it managed to shake the oil cap off of the top of the motor, the second was that it felt pretty strong, like poof poof poof poof basically, there is no water in my oil and the engine idles fine with no warning lights on the dash. Also to note the engine was managing to splash some oil out of the open cap. The bottom of the cap itself smelled a bit like exhaust. Not sure If all of what I describe is normal for a higher compression 4 cyl like I have or a precursor to trouble. Some advice would be great ?.
 

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Not sure if bad news,

The bottom of the cap itself smelled a bit like exhaust. Not sure If all of what I describe is normal for a higher compression 4 cyl like I have or a precursor to trouble. Some advice would be great ?.
Normal for a GDI engine. This is the oil dilution that everyone talks about, why the oil goes dark early and has a fuel / exhaust smell. This is why it is important to keep OCI at 5,000 or less with a high quality oil.

I'm on a OCI 5,000 with Mobil 1 5-30 wt and Hyundai filter most of my driving is a 135 mile daily commute at freeway speeds. Engine uses no detectable oil between changes.
 

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Not sure if bad news,

After reading replies here earlier, I was private messaged by someone mentioning a sizzling sound in their engine bay at load, I noticed mine does this, but only at high rpm, basically redline, normal loads, even with the pedal floored do not produce this noise...I was told it is pinging from oil cooking off the engine, not sure if that is true or not, but now has me getting paranoid. Originally, I simply thought this noise was the plastic intake or similar heaving or moving with the engine (this engine does like to dance a bit under the hood).

This evening is rather warm, after driving home from work, I decided to pop the hood and look things over.oil level is okay, and I was curious to the engine's blowby, based on the horror stories. I don't recall it being this strong, but maybe my memory isn't clear. I removed the oil cap and started the engine. To start it managed to shake the oil cap off of the top of the motor, the second was that it felt pretty strong, like poof poof poof poof basically, there is no water in my oil and the engine idles fine with no warning lights on the dash. Also to note the engine was managing to splash some oil out of the open cap. The bottom of the cap itself smelled a bit like exhaust. Not sure If all of what I describe is normal for a higher compression 4 cyl like I have or a precursor to trouble. Some advice would be great ?.

If your oil level is still full you are not likely having a problem with blow by. But to be clear, All internal combustion engines have some blow by. All modern engines use a PCV system which uses intake vacuum to suck the gases (which you smelled when you removed the cap since you opened a "closed" system) along with any moisture and vaporized oil etc out of the engine and reinjects it in the intake somewhere behind the throttle. Its not just GDI engines, this is an emissions thing, it is also absolutely necessary to keep the crankcase clear and have controlled amounts of fresh air come back into the system balancing pressures. If your worried about blow by get a decent catch can from k5optimastore or the vendor of your choice. Its a 10 minute install and you will no longer have to wonder. As for the oil splashing out with the cap removed, thats normal. I would have to hear the "sizzle" to have any opinion. Thats a new one on me unless its an oil or coolant leak or moisture from the ac hitting something hot.



You mentioned running the engine pretty hard, engines run hard will have more blow by than an engine driven conservatively. Again its normal. More exhaust gases get into the crankcase at high speed operation and Oil gets whipped up and caught in the gases and recirculated into the motor. This is one of the reasons high rpm engines use some type windage tray.To give an example. Ive seen new corvettes (<10k miles) at the track which after racing for 30 minutes or so WOT had an inch of oil and moisture in the can. Definitely not "wrecked" motors. They are stupid fast.
 

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Normal for a GDI engine.
I have not noticed any of that from UOAs. I actually took a crankcase pressure reading through the dip stick tube and got negligible reading using 1-5 psi oil filled gauge. There was no way to do it under load, so reading was at 2500 - 3000 rpm in park.

I also have a very sensitive air filled cm/HG gauge which I used as well and it bounced around in the zero range.
 

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Have you ever done a soot test on your oil, or is this just internet expertise?
I'll get you a UOA with soot loading on my next oil change on my GDI.

Don't need to be a rocket scientist to equate dirt black oil and sooted up exahust to know soot. I've owned many diesels and my GDI oil is almost as "dirty" as a diesel engine's oil at a 5k oil change interval.

https://www.lubrizoladditives360.com/gdi-soot-a-new-challenge/
'https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301679X15000432
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2017/05/20170524-gdi.html
https://phys.org/news/2016-07-gasoline-direct-green-choice.html
 

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I'll get you a UOA with soot loading on my next oil change on my GDI.

Don't need to be a rocket scientist to equate dirt black oil and sooted up exahust to know soot. I've owned many diesels and my GDI oil is almost as "dirty" as a diesel engine's oil at a 5k oil change interval.
I had a 2007 and a 2009 6.6 duramax. Loved the power but ended up swearing off them due to fuel and maintenance costs.
 

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I have not noticed any of that from UOAs. I actually took a crankcase pressure reading through the dip stick tube and got negligible reading using 1-5 psi oil filled gauge. There was no way to do it under load, so reading was at 2500 - 3000 rpm in park.

I also have a very sensitive air filled cm/HG gauge which I used as well and it bounced around in the zero range.
All "turbo or forced induction" engines have a greater chance of having or developing more blowby then a normally aspirated production engine. Higher compression ratios, pressures with OEM tolerances will either have or develop more blow by, causing more contaminates into the crankcase and diluting the oil. GDI by the higher compression and fuel delivery directly into the combustion chamber all have more contaminates entering the oil.

Is it enough to be able to measure increased pressure in the crankcase - I dont know - if the emissions systems (PCV, vents, canister) are working correctly I would be surprised if you could measure any noticeable pressure change as they are there to scavenge the crankcase.

Every GDI that I have ever checked the oil on or done an oil change on has had black oil (almost immediately) with a light fuel / exhaust smell, much more so than a non GDI engine. And honestly I have only had limited exposure (5 cars) that were GDI in Hyundai and KIA but I do have experience as a mechanic from 1970 to 1983 (ASE Certified 2 yr after the program started 1974 , California SMOG Tech licensed in 1974, Datsun, VW, and Bosch Certifications through dealerships) as well as a lot of project cars and motorcycles.

IMO this is why maintaining the basic quality of the oil at it peak efficiency and using a synthetic oil and quality filters are very important protection for longevity.

The links that Drewd posted above seem to support this.
 

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And honestly I have only had limited exposure (5 cars) that were GDI in Hyundai and KIA but I do have experience as a mechanic from 1970 to 1983 (ASE Certified 2 yr after the program started 1974 , California SMOG Tech licensed in 1974, Datsun, VW, and Bosch Certifications through dealerships) as well as a lot of project cars and motorcycles.
I can't relate the past 30 years, only what I'm finding on my engine which doesn't fit the scare mongering results so far in my GDI.
 

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Is it enough to be able to measure increased pressure in the crankcase - I dont know - if the emissions systems (PCV, vents, canister) are working correctly I would be surprised if you could measure any noticeable pressure change as they are there to scavenge the crankcase.
The closed PCV system will not only pull the gases etc out of the crankcase but it also pull clean air from a source near the airfilter or intake conduit. The pressures are pretty well balanced here. In an open system used on older vehicles , think 60s 70s, they used a PCV valve on one valve cover and open air filter on the other. Wasnt perfect as at lower RPMs the gases would go out the fresh air filter. But it was still a big improvement. IMO an open system is what you would need to measure with your instrument. You could "open" the system on your Hyundai and see what reading you get.
 

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You could "open" the system on your Hyundai and see what reading you get.
That's something I'll look into - maybe a better position for pressure gauge.

Yes, if the PCV system is working properly then excess pressure should be pulled from the crankcase, I don't know how bad blow-by needs to get to increase the pressure and my hot engine compression test went to 205 psi on all four, so where is the blow-by. The PCV tube to intake also has been clean of oil as I used a cue tip to probe down it's length and I have no exhaust smell or evidence of dirty fumes coming from the tube.
 

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Id try it at the PCV valve. the valve will open and should give you a good reading when the pressure builds enough to open it. Would not recommend a long test but yeah should work. Maybe open the oil pour port while getting a second reading at the pcv for comparison of open vs closed.
 

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You are better off using standard oil and changing oil and oil filter every 3000 miles or even 2500 adding a quarter to half quart of oil as needed and checking oil every month! Modern engines a lot of them were engineered in such a way to burn more oil and also this tytof engine is more fuel efficient, I readd an engineering article on it once
 
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