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Discussion Starter #1
Over the past week or so, my 2017 Elantra Limited has slipped out of gear a few times. It seems like it happens after slowing down (for example after a turn), and then upon accelerating, the engine revs without engaging the drive wheels, then kicks in after a second or two. Has anyone else experienced this? I will be bringing it to the dealer next week, but wondered if anyone else has experienced this, and if so, what was the finding or resolution?
 

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Did on other vehicles, most common is a loss of transmission fluid, is all hydraulic and short of it,all kinds of strange things will happen.

Can you see fluid on top of your engine undercover? Only cure with these things is to replace the entire transmission.
 

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Check the fluid level. No dipstick but remove plug on side of pan and check fluid level, but the car needs to on level ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's under warranty, so I'm taking it to the dealer. I am asking them to check the transmission and issue any updates.
 

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I did experience this once so far in my 2018 Elantra SEL. I was in heavy traffic. I let off the gas. Traffic started accelerating and I stepped on the gas to go right as the transmission was doing It's typical aggressive deceleration downshift. It caused the transmission to slip and the engine revved up aggressively before going into gear. Unnerving as heck. Thankfully that was the only time. I've heard of others needing their transmission replaced. Yours may be a candidate for replacement. The whole reason I bought this Elantra was the lack of CVT, dual clutch, GDI, or turbo for increased reliability and longevity. It's been proving me wrong this first year of ownership, sadly.
 

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Come to think about it shortly after I purchased the 2017 Limited received a recall from Hyundai to bring it back to my dealer to have the transmission code reflashed.

Electronically controlled automatic transmissions been around for the last 30 or so years. 88 Supra has one, it's transmission logic has its own case. Stuff like this was all put into the ECU to save on wiring and hardware.

One son was told he needed a new transmission for his GM SUV, 4,000 bucks. Said bring it home. Found dirty switch contacts in his brake switch, would not go into overdrive. dirty contacts in what use to be called the neutral safety switch, and also the connector to the transmission, mounted underneath exposed to road salt, cleaned and tried to waterproof after that, no more problems after another 120,000 miles.

No more governors, vacuum modulators, throttle rods in these things, for years transmission were self-contained. Now just solenoid valves that are switched by electronics, like an 89 cent microcontroller, but they want a huge fortune for these.

Ten years ago, I replaced every component in a GM TH-400 transmission, everything, even the planetary gears in a huge transmission for a motorhome for 450 bucks with all Borg Warner parts made in the USA. This is another problem with some transmissions, but not with Hyundai.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@SethD yes it was a little unnerving, but I hadn't even thought it might be so severe a problem as to require replacement of the transmission. I won't be surprised if they can't recreate it--it's only happened to me twice, and I can't remember the specific conditions. If I can figure out how to recreate it, I will do that and demonstrate it to them. Meanwhile, they are going to do a general check and apply updates.

Back when I had a 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan with 100K miles on it, I had a similar experience, and it turned out that it was low fluid. After fluid was added, and the transmission oil cooler lines were replaced (or maybe the cooler also, don't remember), there were no further issues. Haven't seen any transmission fluid on the garage floor, and haven't observed any leaks, so I'd be surprised if it's low fluid in this vehicle, with only 20K miles on it.
 

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Microcomputers found their way into automotive in the 80's, need code that was permanently burnt into a memory chip and unchangeable so software writters had to be more careful with lots of testing.

Then in 1996 electrically erasable programmable read-only memory came out that can be easily updated over the internet, but not cheap if some grease monkey is doing the downloading at a 100 bucks per hour.

Stated that I did have to bring my 2017 Limited in for an AT software update due to a recall, another example of poor testing of new software.
 
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