Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all -

So, I have a 2013 2.0T, which makes 264 hp and 269 lb-ft of torque at 1750 rpm. The new 2017 2.0T has been reduced to 240hp and 260 lb-ft at 1450 rpm. I'm assuming for the sake of fuel economy, emissions, or reliability.

I don't know much about HP or torque... so does this change amount to a significant reduction in power/performance? Or do you think the average person wouldn't notice?

I'm not a wild driver, but I do appreciate the oomph that the turbo provides when I am accelerating on a highway on ramp.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
We have a 2017 2.0T. We never drove the previous year model but our car accelerates fine including getting on crowded Houston freeways. We don't feel we need more power. The turbo's torque is great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Actually the new set-up makes less peak power but makes more at a lower rpm range so it is actually faster. They are using a smaller more efficient turbo. Here is a video with a Santa Fe vs a Kia Sorento with the new turbo. The Sorento is longer and weighs more as well. Check it out.


Video is from TheFastLaneCar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrWalJ0OPRY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I'm in the same boat as jbc77. We have a '17 SFS and never drove any previous models. I will say that it has plenty of power and it doesn't feel lacking in power in any way. I have had and still own some VW TDIs (diesel cars) and the low end torque on the '17 2.0T engine is very impressive and diesel like. I think Hyundai made a wise move by adjusting the HP/Torque numbers for better efficiency. I really like the 2.0T engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Keep in mind the HP numbers the manufacturer lists are at the crank, so the Santa Fe 2.0T would have around 210-220 hp (on a good day-weather conditions/air quality) at the wheels, depending on being AWD or FWD....

Like MuzzleFlash mentioned, it has better low end power.... The only loss of power you'd feel would likely be at higher speeds, so maybe when you push the gas to go from 80 to 100? Not sure, but a daily driver like most of us will not care about the difference at those speeds anyways...

I had a 2013 SFS 2.0T AWD, and I think it came with a Mitsubishi turbo (TD 04 or something).... Not sure about the new turbo brand, but I believe it is a smaller turbo, so less turbo lag, better response... At least it is like that in the Sonatas, which uses the same engine setup....

If you want a better response from the engine, best and cheapest options would be an air intake (a cold air intake system from YF Sonata would fit the DM Santa Fe) and possibly an exhaust, although some systems can be a little more costly....

I attached some pictures from YF Sonata and DM Santa Fe (both 2.0T) so you can also see the same engine setup.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
If you want a better response from the engine, best and cheapest options would be an air intake (a cold air intake system from YF Sonata would fit the DM Santa Fe)
I'd consider the stock air intake a "cold air intake system" on my '17 2.0T. As you can see from my attached picture, the intake in the front of the air box goes routes to the front of the vehicle where it pulls in "cold" air from the front grill while driving. I think the stock system is a good set up.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I'd consider the stock air intake a "cold air intake system" on my '17 2.0T. As you can see from my attached picture, the intake in the front of the air box goes routes to the front of the vehicle where it pulls in "cold" air from the front grill while driving. I think the stock system is a good set up.
I was referring to more of an aftermarket setup, but sure the stock setup is also an intake system for sure.... Obviously all of the intake systems are set up to provide cool air into the engine, but the stock systems usually have their restrictions...

And I do understand that you may have seen some F&F wanna-be kids putting in a cone filter ,removing the ducts from the stock setup, that directs the air flow from the front of the car to the intake section, and leaving the cone filter without a heat shield in the engine bay, which literally makes it a "hot air intake" (Picture attached for a poorly designed intake system, where the person chose to locate the air filter cone in the worst place in the engine bay - in front of the hot engine over the headers)

I am talking more about a high flow air intake system properly placed under the hood, by leaving the air ducts and placing a heat shield around the cone filter.... The system also replaces the plastic pipes that crinkle when you push the throttle, with metal or carbon fiber pipes, hence the high flow...

But surely it is an investment and different tastes/choices, so nothing to argue about...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everyone for the information. I'm glad to hear that the numbers are misleading. I had to figure something was up.


Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I am going with the older version you have has reliability issues just the like 2.0T Sonata and Optima had. That's why at least the Sonata dropped their numbers as well. That high HP was causing issues, namely overheating cylinder #2. If you read people who have had engine troubles on all three platforms you will notice that cylinder #2 is one of the top issues. It would get too hot and overheat the spark plug and the bottom of the electrode would melt and fall off into the cylinder, thus destroying it. How do I know you ask? Because my 2012 blew an engine that way and so did numerous of other people on the Sonata's forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I am going from a 2013 SFS 2.0T to a 2016 Sorento 2.0T so this will be interesting.

I noticed during test drives that the Sorento did feel just as quick if not more. I thought the 'more' part was just in my head, but apparently not!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
I am going with the older version you have has reliability issues just the like 2.0T Sonata and Optima had. That's why at least the Sonata dropped their numbers as well. That high HP was causing issues, namely overheating cylinder #2. If you read people who have had engine troubles on all three platforms you will notice that cylinder #2 is one of the top issues. It would get too hot and overheat the spark plug and the bottom of the electrode would melt and fall off into the cylinder, thus destroying it. How do I know you ask? Because my 2012 blew an engine that way and so did numerous of other people on the Sonata's forum.
Is there a remedy for this problem? Should I change the spark plugs sooner than the 45K they recommend? Use certain type of plugs? I have a 2015 Ultimate and do the occasional "punch it" but not too often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
Is there a remedy for this problem? Should I change the spark plugs sooner than the 45K they recommend? Use certain type of plugs? I have a 2015 Ultimate and do the occasional "punch it" but not too often.
The initial post goes back to 2016 and the subject might have some relevance to your question. The 2013 2.0T was rated at release to be more powerful than the later MY where Hyundai went to a smaller turbo - but back in 2013 and 2014 and maybe 2015 you will find a number of posts where engines were damaged by spark plugs coming apart in the internal cylinders. According to a knowledge Hyundai mechanic changes were made to the engine map and installed when the auto was brought in for service or recall work. This seemed to have largely solved that problem - but at the same time I wonder if a MY with the larger turbo was put on a dyno if the power rating would be the same 264/269. Power ratings at the crank are rarely tested outside of the oem doing it. Hyundai also can sell you a more expensive NGK spark plug if you wish to go that route - I opted not to but did change the plugs at 45k miles with a Denso of a lower heat range. mine is a 2013 and still has the 10/100 power train warranty and my position is that if Hyundai's new and higher cost plug was useful in preventing spark plug related engine issues - the should have issued a TSB to owners and provided the plugs for free. Owners can still use plugs from a number of makers - some which probably aren't as resilient as NGKs or Densos .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Something not mentioned but of more importance to many would be reliability. Will these turbos make it well past the 10/100 warranties? I'm a 2013 2T owner, love my car and hoping to love it in another 10years . SO FAR... almost perfect 57000miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
Something not mentioned but of more importance to many would be reliability. Will these turbos make it well past the 10/100 warranties? I'm a 2013 2T owner, love my car and hoping to love it in another 10years . SO FAR... almost perfect 57000miles.
Are you referring to the entire engine or just the turbocharger itself ? In the MY 2013 - 2015 it's highly likely the turbochargers have a much higher life expectancy than the engine itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
I have a 2016 2.0T and have not driven the 2017 or later when they went to a smaller turbo. Benefits of a smaller turbo, is it will spool up faster so less lag at first that will give a faster jump start than a 2013-2016. Better fuel economy and faster 0-100km/h times, but guarantee the 2013-2016 will have a faster 1/4 mile time because the bigger turbo will give you more top end. But who drives their SF at the track one might ask? The time difference will not be that much at all I might add. But what I do like about the new turbo setup is that I am sure it would get rid of the turbo lag when driving in town speeds. I find my 2016 driving through town kind of cruises around 1500 RPM so the turbo is not really spooled up enough especially when pulling a trailer or boat etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
The 274HP is faster 0-60 as well as 1/4 mile time
2013 264HP @ 6000 Torque 269 @ 1750, 6.6 0-60 1/4 mile 14.8 EPA MPG 20/27 23
2017 240HP @ 6000 Torque 260 @ 1450, 7.1 0-60 1/4 mile 15.4 EPA MPG 20/28 23

That 240 HP with 9 ft-lbs of torque less, but with a 300 RPM lower isn't going to make up for the loss of 24HP.

Some could care less and never notice the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
The 274HP is faster 0-60 as well as 1/4 mile time
2013 264HP @ 6000 Torque 269 @ 1750, 6.6 0-60 1/4 mile 14.8 EPA MPG 20/27 23
2017 240HP @ 6000 Torque 260 @ 1450, 7.1 0-60 1/4 mile 15.4 EPA MPG 20/28 23

That 240 HP with 9 ft-lbs of torque less, but with a 300 RPM lower isn't going to make up for the loss of 24HP.

Some could care less and never notice the difference.
Where are those numbers from? Interested b/c the TFL car video linked earlier shows the larger heavier Sorento with the smaller turbo consistently beating the Santa Fe Sport with the larger turbo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Something not mentioned but of more importance to many would be reliability. Will these turbos make it well past the 10/100 warranties? I'm a 2013 2T owner, love my car and hoping to love it in another 10years . SO FAR... almost perfect 57000miles.
2013 SFS 2.0T, original owner, 144,000 miles. Starting to have small issues like wheel speed sensor(s) and brake switch. But engine wise, still runs strong.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top