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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My Sonata PHEV had Hybrid System failed not once, but twice within a span of 1.5 months. It's been hardly 1.5 years since I had bought this car. In both cases the Check Hybrid system warning comes up and Engine looses total power. The 1st time it happened, it was in the middle of a busy 405 freeway and was left all of a sudden with no power on the engine. Extremely dangerous and life threatening problem to face with. With what ever power was left, was able to coast to the ramp on the right. Stopping anywhere in 405 freeway is absolutely dangerous, even on the shoulder (many people including cops has been rear ended). The 2nd time it happened it was on a 3 lane local Parkway still dangerous as I am left with no power to control the car. It was 106 degrees outside while I was waiting outside for the tow truck to come. The car had to be towed to the dealership in both cases. The 2nd time the car had to be towed I had called Hyundai roadside assistance, and that turned to be a total disaster, which I am not getting into here as that will take another post to describe the awfull experience I had. After that I had to call my AAA service to get it towed. The dealership took 1 month to fix the car the 1st time. They ended up replacing the Power relay Assembly which had to be shipped from South Korea. It ran for close to 1.5 months and again the same problem with the Check Hybrid System warning and its back at the dealership. The dealer ship says that the Power relay has gone again and Hyundai now wants to see if replacing the Hybrid Battery will fix it. It seems to be a trial and error thing from Hyundai's end, let's try this, let's try that and see. I have become their unpaid real time Tester to try out their solutions.Now they want another month to fix it!!! Highly unreliable car, imagine getting this problem in the middle of nowhere, this car cannot be trusted. I have so much expectation from this car when I bought it but it turned to be a Lemon :frown:
 

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I'm also trying to get Hyundai to buy my Plug in back. It failed to charge, twice. Today it almost died, while accelerating.


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Discussion Starter #5

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Discussion Starter #9
Just out of curiosity, how many miles were on the car when this happened?
I had 32K miles on it when it happened 1st. How about you ? I believe that for those who haven't faced it yet, it is a ticking time bomb, by the time it gets to this mark, there is a good chance it will fail.
 

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I had 32K miles on it when it happened 1st. How about you ? I believe that for those who haven't faced it yet, it is a ticking time bomb, by the time it gets to this mark, there is a good chance it will fail.
19,480 miles. I feel lucky that it happened before 20k because that's the cut off for lemon-law in New Jersey. The fact that they've been unable to fix mine for over 8 weeks indicates how ill-prepared Hyundai is for dealing with this issue.
 

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Thank you. I am using an Attorney as well.
There is both a state and a federal lemon law. The federal law covers almost anything, whereas the CA Lemon Law covers new vehicles. I suspect your attorney will be using the federal lemon law. The CA lemon law requires the problems begin in the first 18K miles or 18 months. I am unsure how many months you have owned your new car.
 

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There is both a state and a federal lemon law. The federal law covers almost anything, whereas the CA on covers new vehicles. I suspect your attorney will be using the federal lemon law. The CA lemon law requires the problems begin in the first 18K miles or 18 months. I am unsure how many months you have owned your new car.
The Lemon law is different depending on which state.

Here in Washington state, you have 24,000 miles or 24 months, which ever comes sooner of the two.
 

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So true! Did you notice the OP and I both live in CA?
Opps! I saw kgoroway and thought we where in that tread.

Here in Washington state you go through the state's arbitration process if you wish to use the Lemon law. However, I would advise one to get an attorney to represent you.
 

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Opps! I saw kgoroway and thought we where in that tread.

Here in Washington state you go through the state's arbitration process if you wish to use the Lemon law. However, I would advise one to get an attorney to represent you.
My attorney sent a letter to Hyundai, informing them of my desire to have them buy back my car. It mentioned the attorney's fee, and that if the company settled right away, they would go no higher. This was not actually necessary.
CA Lemon Law requires a notification to the BBB Auto Division in Virginia, to officially begin a Lemon Law case. My attorney has done this, as Hyundai never responded to his letter. Now Hyundai will be receiving a higher attorney bill, and my car gets more depreciation every day they delay buying my PHEV back. Depreciation has no affect on the case--it just hurts the resale value of the car, once Hyundai buys it back and tries to sell it.
The BBB decision is *mandatory* for Hyundai to follow, but is optional for me. The BBB may not grant me 100% of what I am allowed under the Lemon Laws. For now, it is a waiting game--for the BBB to act. They have a lot of options available to them, including having a mechanic examine my car, and hold a meeting with the two parties (my attorney and Hyundai.)
Assuming the BBB's decision is not to my satisfaction, I can sue Hyundai directly. My attorney is willing and able to do this (with zero cost to me.)
In the meantime, I will continue to make my car payments, knowing I will be getting them back, if I win.
 

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Just a thought. Maybe it is the way/manner some of these things get handled? I live in CA and just this year (January 2017) Hyundai bought back my 2012 Genesis Couple that had 75K miles on it. The issue I reported had started at 58K miles and around a year earlier. It was an intermittent issue so it was difficult for both sides really. However, working with them and documenting, was able to get the issue validated and ultimately bought back without any attorney, arbitration, etc. Just myself... Never threatened anyone with actions, just due diligence and following protcols.

Really sucks that in these several cases here that is has gone the way it has. Seems to me like Hyundai will come out on the losing side in each case as well as potential longer reaching damages to customer opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There is both a state and a federal lemon law. The federal law covers almost anything, whereas the CA Lemon Law covers new vehicles. I suspect your attorney will be using the federal lemon law. The CA lemon law requires the problems begin in the first 18K miles or 18 months. I am unsure how many months you have owned your new car.
The CA "Lemon Law" presumption is a guide, not an absolute rule, the Lemon law rules becomes more severe when the safety of the driver is in question. Its even applicable to used cars. I think most lawyers use the CA Lemon rule when possible. It seems to be most favorable to consumers, but I would assume that any attorney will use the best tools (state/federal laws) available to win the case. Anyhow, the best outcome will be for Hyundai to recall these cars without putting more people at risk. I have lodged a complaint at NHTSA as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
19,480 miles. I feel lucky that it happened before 20k because that's the cut off for lemon-law in New Jersey. The fact that they've been unable to fix mine for over 8 weeks indicates how ill-prepared Hyundai is for dealing with this issue.
Looks like you will be eligible for a full refund minus the allowance.
 

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The CA "Lemon Law" presumption is a guide, not an absolute rule, the Lemon law rules becomes more severe when the safety of the driver is in question.
This is something I had not heard. I am hoping you can explain what "more severe" means to you.
 
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