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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 2014 Sante Fe sport, 2.4 L. 97,345 kms. The transmission feels weak/lazy and at times will slip when changing from 1>2, 2>3, and sometimes 3>4. I notice this mostly upon initial start up in the day.The transmission also will do this under easy acceleration , but doesn't seem to exhibit these problems if I drive the vehicle with a heavier foot, which I don't do very often. Had the vehicle in for a recall on the hood release cable and to have an inspection done for a possible bearing issue, brought the trans issue to the dealerships attention, but was told there is nothing wrong, just took the car to a transmission shop and will see what the shop tells me, and will update later today as to what the shop said. If anybody else has had a similar scenario please let me know what the diagnosis or result of any repairs , thanks.
 

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My santa fe is like this when it's still cold. This is a "feature", not a defect =P
it's always been lethargic unless you really step on it.

Do you live in cold climate?
 

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Yes , Hamilton Ontario, I just had an uneasy feeling about what I was feeling in the way it shifted when initially driven at the start of the day, thanks for your reply, and yes if I step into it there is no laziness whatsoever , cheers
 

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Have you done a drain/refill on your ATF? At 97k km (60k mi), pretty much everyone falls into the “severe” service interval which is where you are at.

It’s not a magic cure but depending on state of your fluid currently, that may help clutch plates grab.

My 14 SFS feels more sluggish than Sonata with same engine but it’s a heavier car with different gear ratios.


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I am not sure of your level of knowledge so please do not take this the wrong way....Do you mean delayed upshifts when cold or do you feel actual slippage where the engine revs during shifting / between gears? If you are feeling true slipping during shifts that is not normal and the longer it is driven with that condition the more expensive it will be to repair (Assuming that an independent might repair versus replacement)
 

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Trans is essentially a "puppet".. only does what it' controller tell it to do..

Take the thing out of ECO also,, makes it drive "stupid"....


Scan for DTC, if none, reset Adaptive learn while hot and drive it again to start learn process again..
 

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Ours does the same thing when its cold here, which is only for about 4 months out of the year. It doesnt feel like its slipping, just kinda "delayed" shifting or hanging onto gears. Operates fine after warming up. Seems pretty normal from the cars Ive driven. We keep eco off because the vehicle is an absolute turd with it on.
 

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Delayed upshifts in colder weather (Usually more noticeable in northern States) is because the programming is set to try to bring the cats and oxygen sensors online faster to cut emissions. Delayed shifts are an entirely different feel from a transmission that is slipping, which is why I asked the OP for a clarification. That delays could be construed as the transmission hanging in gear due to a lack of engine power. There are a couple of streets on my way home that have slight upgrades and the trans wants to hold third gear so long that I usually just manually upshift.
 

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Delayed upshifts in colder weather (Usually more noticeable in northern States) is because the programming is set to try to bring the cats and oxygen sensors online faster to cut emissions. Delayed shifts are an entirely different feel from a transmission that is slipping, which is why I asked the OP for a clarification. That delays could be construed as the transmission hanging in gear due to a lack of engine power. There are a couple of streets on my way home that have slight upgrades and the trans wants to hold third gear so long that I usually just manually upshift.
Yeah thats why I tried to describe it as delayed and also mentioned the eco mode. Every automatic Ive owned has held onto gears when its cold to get things warmed up. My sister in law has a 2013 sonata 2.4 and just last week was claiming that the trans was starting to slip. I suspect that its just doing what were describing here. She lives in northern kentucky, I guess its been cold up north recently from my understanding lol.
 

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ECO mode cuts engine power dramatically and also provides for quicker upshifts and fewer downshifts. You can see the difference for yourself by pulling away from a standing start in ECO mode and then switch to normal while maintaining the same throttle application. The change in available engine power is very noticeable. I use ECO mode on the highway, if I am in an area with mainly level roads and light traffic, and during the winter when less power is preferable for better traction anyway.

ECO mode is good for about 10% to 15% better mileage (Depending on your driving habits and yes, I have confirmed the improvement) but the reduction in available power can be a big negative if you need it in an emergency situation. Going to a heavier or even full throttle application does not, as far as I have been able to tell, over ride ECO mode. You have less power across the board until you switch it off. You also need to avoid lugging the engine in ECO mode as that is harmful to the engine's connecting rods over the life of the vehicle.
 

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Is it actually less power or just much slower throttle response and different shift points? I don't think it actually messes with fuel strategy except for cutting the throttle response by half. Too annoying to drive in all the time, I definitely agree. Can achieve the same thing by just taking it easier during acceleration.

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Is it actually less power or just much slower throttle response and different shift points? I don't think it actually messes with fuel strategy except for cutting the throttle response by half. Too annoying to drive in all the time, I definitely agree. Can achieve the same thing by just taking it easier during acceleration.

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I actually notice the most dramatic savings using it on the highway - keeps you in sixth gear much more than if you weren't in ECO. I think I get about 1 mpg better although I just use it for highway trips.
 

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KP....It alters the power curve dramatically, at least on my 2015 2.4L. Put your in ECO and accelerate at a moderate pace and while in second or third gear while holding the throttle steady cycle back to normal mode. You will feel the added power. It is VERY noticeable. What you are perceiving as a slower throttle response is most likely the reduced power curve. It does also alter the shift points to faster upshifts / upshifts at lower vehicle speed than in normal mode.

Many ECO settings in other vehicles only alter shift points. Hyundai took a different approach. I do think that there should be a programmed over ride so that once you get past (arguably) 3/4 throttle it reverts back to full power until you back off. That would be a nice added safety feature.
 

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We are probably beating this topic to death by now. Surprisingly, there isn't a lot of info out there on the Hyundai Active ECO strategy. I found an old Veloster forum post that supposedly explains how it works.

http://www.veloster.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1206

I'll flip it on in my Sonata and see if it changes the TPS value when I flip it off via ScanGauge. Probably need GDS to see exactly what's happening behind the scenes.

Bottom line, it's insanely annoying and probably best kept off until your kid wants to borrow the car .

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Generally what happens is that ECO mode changes the 1:1 throttle pedal to throttle opening ratio (these are drive by wire remember). In other words, in Normal mode if you push the pedal 1/4 of the way down the throttle body will open 1/4 of the way. In Eco mode if you push the pedal down 1/4 of the way it may only open the throttle body 1/8 of the way (that would be a 1:1/2 ratio). So, the power curve is not really changed, but it sure seems that way because you are getting less power out for the same amount of input (how far you push the pedal) as you did in Normal mode. Combine that with the different shift points and you have better gas mileage.

I hated ECO mode because of the sluggish throttle response, so I installed a thing called a Pedal Commander that makes the 1:1 ratio adjustable to my preference. That means that in ECO mode I can now restore the 1:1 pedal to throttle body response (or make it "better") and keep the different shift points. The result is the car no longer feels sluggish but I still see improved gas mileage over driving in Normal mode.
 

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Crock....OK...That explains a lot and is the best plausible explanation of how the ECO mode operates as I have seen. Also perfectly matches what I experience and described as a change in the power curve for obvious reasons. That device would probably be the best option for me as I find the ECO mode a little too slow to respond and find the normal mode hold the gear ranges just a titch too long on some grades. That said....In ECO mode all I really need to do is apply a bit more throttle. Interesting device for customization but I don't think I'll drop $300 on it.

Thanx again for the description of the ECO mode....
 

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Not to hijack the tread.....Started digging around a little and Crock is correct. Throttle response may be altered. In addition though, based upon what I read on both Kia and Hyundai web sites (Some were Dealer sites with info that looked like it was cut and pasted from owners or shop manuals) other items may be affected as well. The curb idle speed may be lowered a bit, injectors may be turned off (or turned off to a higher degree) when coasting, and there was actually a mention of engine torque being limited (Could be a result of the throttle position sensors signal being modified). So, depending upon your exact model and model year multiple items may be affected when using the ECO button. If you live in a warmer climate keep in mind that a lower engine RPM at idle and due to faster upshifts will result in reduced A/C performance. Lower AC compressor RPMs will result in reduced cooling ability.
 
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