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Discussion Starter #1
Hey There,

2014 Santa Fe - 115,000 km
No prior issues to this.

Vehicle stalls/turns off. Three times in the past week. Vehicle traveling between 60km and 100km. Most recent stall was while accelerating onto highway. The other two times were maintaining a speed of approx 60/70.

The vehicle stalls, but power steering/radio/brakes remain the same. Once pulled over, the vehicle can be started immediately. The last time a "HILL PARKING" notification light came on the dashboard.

My mechanic has said a few of the codes related to a communication error. They cleaned some of the connections. Then it stalled the 2nd and 3rd time. Most recently, the dealer has told my mechanic that the code is related to the ABS... which makes no sense that an ABS sensor will turn off the vehicle.

I will post the codes when I get them later, but was wondering if anyone can help?

Thanks very much,
 

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CC....No way to diagnose that from here, even with the codes. Someone here may be able to point you in a general direction, but that will be about all.....

Once cleaned we generally add dielectric grease to wiring connectors to help if there is an intermittent contact issue and to help prevent any future corrosion. Where applicable there are also tests that can be done on the terminals within each connector is a contact issue is suspected....Basically to see if any are loose, backed out of position, etc...

Issues like this can be a bear to diagnose when it corrects and allows an immediate restart. Could be an electronic component failing, a wiring issue, a wiring connector issue, etc....You will most likely need to get it to a Dealer or independent you know and trust. I'd suggest a Dealer as there may be some emission / powertrain warranty left? If not then an independent would be fine. Again...This may be difficult to diagnose so go into it with patience and understanding as contrary to the popular belief there is no "machine" that we can plug into that will tell us exactly what is wrong.

Do post the codes and keep us updated.......
 
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Just throwing this out there. No harm or foul looking at these two thoughts.

1. Your MAS may be dirty. Mass Airflow Sensor - It's located after the air filter box.
2. Check your O2 sensors for any burnt or clipped wires.

I am not using reference to my own SAS because it's brand new but refer to what your saying the issues are vs what my other vehicle did.

Once again, I'm no mechanic and don't play one on TV. LOL. But ya, like greysave says, post the codes please.
 

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When I worked for Honda a long time ago we had many cars with the same complaints. Troubleshooting is very difficult unless two items are present:
1 Happens while driving for the tech
2 Fuel pressure gauge and a spark tester are connected, both must be visible while driving
Maybe 90% of the time replacing the fuel pump and/or fuel pump relay brought in the solution. It doesn't mean it could help you, however. This usually happened on cars with 60K miles or higher.
Replacing the relay with the pump was recommended because the relay was only $ 30 and access was easy.

To be clear, troubleshooting a car which doesn't start at all is relatively easy.
The hard part is when the car starts up right away before any diagnosis could be completed.

The second most common failure to start or stalling intermittently used to be the igniter, but I don't think igniters are in use today. I retired in 1999 (went into a different line of work.)
 

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Would tend to believe the fuel system has an issue
Compression would be fairly consistent
Meaning if it was a mechanical failure that it would be all the time bad
Spark is controlled by ECU and so is timing of spark
But, would check spark at higher rev .. to see consistency

So, fuel would make a little sense.
Fuel pump makes enough pressure to start and run engine idle
When asked for more fuel to keep up with highway demand, it bogs down
Maybe due to bad fuel. Maybe due to dirty tank. Of even faulty fuel regulator.
So, it stalls on highway.
Pull over and it starts right up.

Okay, I know it is guess work on the internet and especially forums.
Good luck and keep us updated
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi All,

Dealership gave me about $800 in options after first diagnostic. There were no codes stored for them to look up, so they quoted me for plugs, injector cleaning etc etc. I declined because they were just guesses. I left the dealer and it stalled no more than 1km down the road. Turned it back on and went back. They said it was either the ECU (or maybe the PCU... if that's a thing?) or they could grind down some of the connectors for a fraction of the price.

The cleaning was 1hr shop rate (so $130). The new unit was about $700.

The car ran fine until this morning when it stalled travelling approx 50km/hr.

My only issue is that if it's a computer sensor... can that be maintained? If it just stops functioning after 115,000 km is it reasonable for me to be out of pocket to replace the component? I am over warranty by 15K but under in years by 12 months.

Thanks for your suggestions so far - the forum has been a big help
 

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Many manufacturers stick very closely to their warranty. Once the vehicles are out of warranty they are out. And with the longer warranties one can understand why. Is the ECM / PCM covered by the Emissions 8/80 select component warranty (That's 8/80 in US numbers) that might still be in play?

As for maintaining a sensor or a control module.....Nothing you can generally do to prevent a failure other then....I NEVER jump start another vehicle or use another vehicle to jump start mine. Too many risks involved. Use a jump box. Much safer. That said, the fact that you most likely did nothing to cause the failure doesn't make it the manufacturer's fault either. These are very complex machines and sometimes things just break or fail electronically.

It sounds like they are making an (educated?) guess at what may be wrong even with the ECM / PCM? Keep in mind that if it is a guess....No guarantees it will fix it. I agree that it "sounds" like a failed control module because it restarts and runs immediately, but something like a wiring issue could create the same type of symptom. For what it is worth....I know how you feel. I had a classic Chrysler product years ago that would shut down and immediately restart. Guessed at the ECM on my own and that did fix it. It sucks and it is a horrible feeling to make that kind of guess when it involves a lot of money, but even those of us in the business have to make those educated guesses on our own vehicles at times.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Many manufacturers stick very closely to their warranty. Once the vehicles are out of warranty they are out. And with the longer warranties one can understand why. Is the ECM / PCM covered by the Emissions 8/80 select component warranty (That's 8/80 in US numbers) that might still be in play?

As for maintaining a sensor or a control module.....Nothing you can generally do to prevent a failure other then....I NEVER jump start another vehicle or use another vehicle to jump start mine. Too many risks involved. Use a jump box. Much safer. That said, the fact that you most likely did nothing to cause the failure doesn't make it the manufacturer's fault either. These are very complex machines and sometimes things just break or fail electronically.

It sounds like they are making an (educated?) guess at what may be wrong even with the ECM / PCM? Keep in mind that if it is a guess....No guarantees it will fix it. I agree that it "sounds" like a failed control module because it restarts and runs immediately, but something like a wiring issue could create the same type of symptom. For what it is worth....I know how you feel. I had a classic Chrysler product years ago that would shut down and immediately restart. Guessed at the ECM on my own and that did fix it. It sucks and it is a horrible feeling to make that kind of guess when it involves a lot of money, but even those of us in the business have to make those educated guesses on our own vehicles at times.
Thanks very much for your reply!

Being in Canada, I believe my ECM is 8/130 (which I am still well within).

It might not be the manufacturers fault that it failed, but from a business standpoint the customer should not be held at a loss on a 4yo vehicle for a component that does not suffer from "wear and tear". I get it though, it's a car and they cost money.
 

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I would definitely be interested in the resolution of this issue. Please post up once you have it dialed in. Irrelevant but, my GF many years back had a 78 Lincoln Town Car (boat) and sometimes it didn't want to start. The fix was to beat on the ECM with a screwdriver and wala! ECM's are funny little buggers and I imagine in Canada they are subjected to some extreme temperature changes which electronics don't always respond well to.
 

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LOL. Rocket, those early ECMs were junk. The manufacturers had no clue how to build them to withstand heat and vibration. My Chrysler product was also a 1978 and had the ECM (Lean Burn Engine) bolted to the side of the air cleaner where it was subjected to all kinds of heat and vibration. Today's electronic components are much better, but some manufacturers (You all know who I mean by now!) STILL put them and / or their wiring connectors in the worst possible places where they are subjected to salt, water, and mud kicked up by the front or rear tires....

That old Lean Burn......It ran horribly when cold and I had to tweak the choke system to make it work but once warm....It ran well and 18 MPG city and 22 - 25 MPG on the highway in a 1978 V8 powered full size car was unheard of back then.
 

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LOL. Rocket, those early ECMs were junk. The manufacturers had no clue how to build them to withstand heat and vibration. My Chrysler product was also a 1978 and had the ECM (Lean Burn Engine) bolted to the side of the air cleaner where it was subjected to all kinds of heat and vibration. Today's electronic components are much better, but some manufacturers (You all know who I mean by now!) STILL put them and / or their wiring connectors in the worst possible places where they are subjected to salt, water, and mud kicked up by the front or rear tires....

That old Lean Burn......It ran horribly when cold and I had to tweak the choke system to make it work but once warm....It ran well and 18 MPG city and 22 - 25 MPG on the highway in a 1978 V8 powered full size car was unheard of back then.
Mrs had a 2000 Cavalier l that would light up every indicator on the dash when it rained or got humid.

Found out that GM put the ECU up in the right fender well right behind the tire. By the time the problem really got bad it was literally hanging off above the tire as three of the four the rivets holding the mount to the frame had corroded away.

Yes mfgs have come a long way from even 18 years ago
 

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ding ding ding....Yep, the used the PCM like a mud guard, although I thought it was in front of the wheel. Maybe it varied by models year as I ma sure it was in front at times because it and the wiring were also vulnerable to damage from high curbs when being parked........And they STILL put components in similar locations.....

Hopefully in the OPs case it is covered by the longer component specific emissions warranty.
 
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