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I have a 2014 Santa Fe Sport (Turbo) and I purchased it new. It has 87,000 miles on it. In 12/17 at 53,000 mi. I had a right rear wheel sensor go bad and it was replaced. In 8/18 at 62,000 mi I had the left rear wheel sensor go bad and it too was replaced. Now I have the rear wheel speed sensor needing to be replaced AGAIN! Each time this needs to be replaced (post warranty) it is quoted at $280 parts & labor. I am wondering if others have had an issue with speed sensors on this model of vehicle? It seems like an excessive rate of failure to me. I've also had some A/C issues in the past- compressor discharge line was replaced and the blower motor & transistor were also replaced.

This is my first Hyundai and, after having this many issues at under 100,000 mi., I thinking it may well be my last. I have also found that private mechanics charge FAR less than the Hyundai dealerships in my area. Really dissatisfied with Hyundai at this point.
 

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Your vehicle is a very complex machine and yes, things WILL go wrong at less than 100,000 miles. I am not being critical of you. It is just that for some reason a lot of people think these vehicles...Any vehicle....Should be bulletproof for 100,00 miles at least. If you get one that goes for 100,000 miles with no issues then consider yourself lucky.

Wheel speed sensor failure on GM vehicles as an example is not unusual. It is not epidemic, but it happens as do repeat failures. I would agree that three and two repetitively in that short of a period of time is a bit unusual. Do you live in a northern State where corrosion from road chemicals may be an issue? I ask that because we are seeing a LOT more issues in our area since local and State agencies have increased their use of brine. It seems to get into places that standard road salt did not.

And yes, independent shops can be less expensive as they generally do not need to invest in the training, equipment, and people to service the ENTIRE vehicle. They may also use aftermarket parts which may be better or worse than original equipment depending on the manufacturer, model, and component being replaced.
 

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Your vehicle is a very complex machine and yes, things WILL go wrong at less than 100,000 miles. I am not being critical of you. It is just that for some reason a lot of people think these vehicles...Any vehicle....Should be bulletproof for 100,00 miles at least. If you get one that goes for 100,000 miles with no issues then consider yourself lucky.

Wheel speed sensor failure on GM vehicles as an example is not unusual. It is not epidemic, but it happens as do repeat failures. I would agree that three and two repetitively in that short of a period of time is a bit unusual. Do you live in a northern State where corrosion from road chemicals may be an issue? I ask that because we are seeing a LOT more issues in our area since local and State agencies have increased their use of brine. It seems to get into places that standard road salt did not.

And yes, independent shops can be less expensive as they generally do not need to invest in the training, equipment, and people to service the ENTIRE vehicle. They may also use aftermarket parts which may be better or worse than original equipment depending on the manufacturer, model, and component being replaced.
it is the repeated failure under 100,000 mi that I question, not merely an issue. No I do not live up north. I live in FL in the middle of the state and have never driven this on the beach re.salt.

i think needing to replace another sensor after only 30,000 miles seems odd.??
 

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it is the repeated failure under 100,000 mi that I question, not merely an issue. No I do not live up north. I live in FL in the middle of the state and have never driven this on the beach re.salt.

i think needing to replace another sensor after only 30,000 miles seems odd.??
some replacement parts can be of poor quality, you could buy an oem part from one of the online suppliers and take it an Indy to install, do you know what parts source the indy uses ?
Toyotas on the whole are widely acknowledge to be more reliable - but they cost more. Some will chime in that they had this or that problem with their Toyota but my statement is one based on industry reports, not anecdotal .
At least your engine has not seized.
 

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Given your location yes, I would agree that many failures and especially the repetitive one is unusual. There are a few Hyundai Techs who lurk around here. They should be able to shed some insight on how common an issue this is.
 

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Given your location yes, I would agree that many failures and especially the repetitive one is unusual. There are a few Hyundai Techs who lurk around here. They should be able to shed some insight on how common an issue this is.
usually the front are more prone to failure as they see more physical movement - his replacement sensor failed but I don't think he indicated who made the replacement, some replacement parts nowadays are little more than cheap junk.
 
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