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Greetings all,

In the recent cold snap here in the Northeast (3 or 4 days between 5 and -5 degrees F) and after three or four days of not driving it, I went to use it and the car was about 1/2" off the front tires. The car displayed an ECS error. I had it brought to the dealer which they had some difficulty in diagnosing based on the labor charge. In reading the mechanic's notes when I went to pay the bill, I was shocked that the problem appeared to be a blown fuse, which he checked last after what appears to me to be a fairly exhaustive diagnostic procedure. The original bill for this fuse repair was over $500.

My question is that based on the notes (attached and deidentified lol) would it not have made more sense to check the fuse first, and then look to see if there were problems that caused the fuse to blow, rather than check everything first and then realize the fuse was blown?

I appreciate your responses. I do not pretend to be an expert, my car troubleshooting skills ended about 25 years ago - lol.
 

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Greetings all,

In the recent cold snap here in the Northeast (3 or 4 days between 5 and -5 degrees F) and after three or four days of not driving it, I went to use it and the car was about 1/2" off the front tires. The car displayed an ECS error. I had it brought to the dealer which they had some difficulty in diagnosing based on the labor charge. In reading the mechanic's notes when I went to pay the bill, I was shocked that the problem appeared to be a blown fuse, which he checked last after what appears to me to be a fairly exhaustive diagnostic procedure. The original bill for this fuse repair was over $500.

My question is that based on the notes (attached and deidentified lol) would it not have made more sense to check the fuse first, and then look to see if there were problems that caused the fuse to blow, rather than check everything first and then realize the fuse was blown?

I appreciate your responses. I do not pretend to be an expert, my car troubleshooting skills ended about 25 years ago - lol.
As a former aircraft mechanic and someone who used to work on his own cars often, I'd say that checking the fuse is certainly one of the first troubleshooting steps I take. Reading the attached note, it does look like they did what they could to leak check the system and try to identify any problems that may have caused the fuse to blow in the first place, so I don't think they were just running up the tab, so to speak. That said, $500 seems a bit steep.
 
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