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I have noticed some reviews say the Hyundai Elantra is bad in snow. But I wonder if that is just the Hyundai issued tires.

I live in NY so we have snow.

Should I not get this car simply for how it performs in snow?
 

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But I wonder if that is just the Hyundai issued tires....
This. Within general categories of cars (e.g., the small compact FWD class the Elantra is in), differences in snow capability is almost 100% due to tire differences not car differences. Put good snows tires on the Elantra and it will perform as well as any other similar car. Even better all-seasons would help.

- Mark
 

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Lots of Canadians in the MD Elantra forum and I don't see many complaints. I moved from TX to KY last fall and drove in snow my first time last winter with no issues. No blizzards just a few inches with all season tires.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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With a good set of snow tires the Elantra drives and handles pretty good in the snow. I never had any problems last year.
 

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After one winter my only fear is with the ABS brakes that I did not have on my previous car, last winter I almost rear-ended someone because I did not expect a so long braking distance. In summer my ABS kicks in every time I brake over manhole covers or cracks in the pavement, it seems to be a bit too nervous. I use winter tires in winter.
 

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No problems here, with the limited snow we had the past several years. Just use good common sense and plan for the worst.
 

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I put some Michelin X-Ice on mine and it was great in the snow. I turn off the traction control if trying to get up a steep hill or out of a snowbank, as it otherwise cuts the power so the wheels don't spin. No problems last year.
 

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After one winter my only fear is with the ABS brakes that I did not have on my previous car, last winter I almost rear-ended someone because I did not expect a so long braking distance. In summer my ABS kicks in every time I brake over manhole covers or cracks in the pavement, it seems to be a bit too nervous. I use winter tires in winter.
Um what? I know Quebec roads are notoriously crap and in bad condition, but I have never, ever had my ABS come on over cracks in the road, pot holes, tar lines or anything else. Maybe in typical Quebexican fashion you're a late breaker and jump on tie binders too hard?
 

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I have had my ABS come on after hitting a dimple in the road going at a decent speed, along with my back end jumping sideways. Same dimple every time, just down the road from my house :p Plan on getting the KYBs in the spring time to fix the latter problem.
 

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After one winter my only fear is with the ABS brakes that I did not have on my previous car, last winter I almost rear-ended someone because I did not expect a so long braking distance. In summer my ABS kicks in every time I brake over manhole covers or cracks in the pavement, it seems to be a bit too nervous. I use winter tires in winter.
ABS is often misunderstood. It's primary function is not to shorten braking distance but to maintain control of the vehicle while braking in low-grip conditions.

For a long time now, basically as long as ABS has been around, drivers are not taught "threshold braking", which is what ABS is meant to do for the driver.

Without getting into a big long explanation, let me just say this; while it may not seem like the vehicle is stopping as quickly as you'd like it to, you probably wouldn't stop any shorter if you didn't have ABS in that situation because unless you're really good at threshold braking, you'd be locked up and sliding (which is a much worse situation to be in). When ABS is active, you also have the benefit of EBD (electronic braking distribution) which will direct more braking force to the wheels that have more grip and less to the wheels that have less grip.

Not speaking about you specifically, TurboLed, but I hear a lot of people complain about ABS (in any vehicle). I just have to laugh because I know most of those people don't even know what threshold braking is and if they knew what and how ABS works, they'd realize they're FAR better off having it do what it does, than not. ;)

To answer the OP's question: The tires make all the difference. I HATE it when someone gives a vehicle a negative review and claim it's not good in snow. The car itself has nothing to do with it. There's a reason I call all-season tires "no-season tires". ;)

Went through last winter, drove in lots of heavy snow conditions with a full set of proper winter tires and the car was fantastic. No problems at all. :)

Oh, forgot to mention; I too experience the ABS activating momentarily while braking over sharp bumps in the road. It's to be expected when the wheel that's bouncing over the bump locks up for a moment. That's what triggers the system to active.
 

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ABS is often misunderstood. It's primary function is not to shorten braking distance but to maintain control of the vehicle while braking in low-grip conditions.

For a long time now, basically as long as ABS has been around, drivers are not taught "threshold braking", which is what ABS is meant to do for the driver.

Without getting into a big long explanation, let me just say this; while it may not seem like the vehicle is stopping as quickly as you'd like it to, you probably wouldn't stop any shorter if you didn't have ABS in that situation because unless you're really good at threshold braking, you'd be locked up and sliding (which is a much worse situation to be in). When ABS is active, you also have the benefit of EBD (electronic braking distribution) which will direct more braking force to the wheels that have more grip and less to the wheels that have less grip.

Not speaking about you specifically, TurboLed, but I hear a lot of people complain about ABS (in any vehicle). I just have to laugh because I know most of those people don't even know what threshold braking is and if they knew what and how ABS works, they'd realize they're FAR better off having it do what it does, than not. ;)

To answer the OP's question: The tires make all the difference. I HATE it when someone gives a vehicle a negative review and claim it's not good in snow. The car itself has nothing to do with it. There's a reason I call all-season tires "no-season tires". ;)

Went through last winter, drove in lots of heavy snow conditions with a full set of proper winter tires and the car was fantastic. No problems at all. :)

Oh, forgot to mention; I too experience the ABS activating momentarily while braking over sharp bumps in the road. It's to be expected when the wheel that's bouncing over the bump locks up for a moment. That's what triggers the system to active.
You nailed it............... Most people just don't know how to drive safely when it snows
 

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Had to pump the brakes manally on my 2004 Saturn Ion once when I had to make an emergency stop on the 401 freeway in Toronto; learned to do it in Young Drivers, and it came to me instinctively that day. It was the only time I ever felt a car almost lose control in good driving conditions (I had two other instances where I was driving too fast in rain or snow).
 

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Not speaking about you specifically, TurboLed, but I hear a lot of people complain about ABS (in any vehicle). I just have to laugh because I know most of those people don't even know what threshold braking is and if they knew what and how ABS works, they'd realize they're FAR better off having it do what it does, than not. ;)
In the specific case of a snowy road, sometimes a shorter braking distance can be achieved by locking the wheels for a while allowing some of the snow cover to "pile up" under the wheels, and letting off the brake then slows down the car because the wheels now needs to climb that fresh pile of snow. If the ABS pulses too quickly, it just let the car slide over a longer distance in that situation.
 

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In the specific case of a snowy road, sometimes a shorter braking distance can be achieved by locking the wheels for a while allowing some of the snow cover to "pile up" under the wheels, and letting off the brake then slows down the car because the wheels now needs to climb that fresh pile of snow. If the ABS pulses too quickly, it just let the car slide over a longer distance in that situation.
It's not just about stopping distance. It's about maintaining control.

When your wheels are locked and sliding, you have no control.

When the ABS is pulsing, you still have control to a much higher degree.

Every situation is unique, however. In this case you're talking about several inches of snow by the sounds of it. I can see how the method you described could work, but I wouldn't rely on that every time. ;)
 

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I purchased my car in November last year and resisted buying winter tires thinking that obviously the car had new tires and therefore should be fine for the winter. Flawed thinking. The Hankooks really were not very good even in the not so bad winter we had. This year I've decided to shell out for Michelin X13 Ice. I've never bought winter tires before but it's time to stop being so cheap !

Chris
 

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Ok! In for some General Tire Altimax Arctics -- good tires from the reviews available. Picked 'em up from Discount Tires Direct for $70 a piece, and some new rims from Costco. Under $450 for the whole thing. :)
 

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I purchased my car in November last year and resisted buying winter tires thinking that obviously the car had new tires and therefore should be fine for the winter. Flawed thinking. The Hankooks really were not very good even in the not so bad winter we had. This year I've decided to shell out for Michelin X13 Ice. I've never bought winter tires before but it's time to stop being so cheap !

Chris
exact same thinking I had... except by early February I had bought winter tires and rims.... felt the stock 17" Hankooks were simply unsafe and I live in a valley town... lots of hills where traction was needed both uphill and downhill. Was concerned about straight line snow packed hwy driving as well.
I used one of the winter tires to sub out for my spare tire during the summer... for a full size spare tire in the trunk.
XI3 ice are awesome winter tires per every review I have read.
 
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