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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I am new to this forum, but have participated in similar forums for other make/model vehicles, and know there is power in the community discussion for common concerns with vehicles where dealerships may try to make you think it is isolated only to your car. Which, I kind of feel like is happening to me now.
2013 Elantra GT, first Hyundai I have ever purchased. Been an avid Honda/Acura owner for years, but decided to pick up a used GT with 140K on it, and still covered under a factory extended warranty until 160k....what could possibly be the downside to that?!
Well, I continued to build a relationship with my local dealer by taking it to them regularly for check ups and oil changes, warranty work etc... Had my final oil change of the warranty at 159k, and low and behold, at 161k, get transmission slipping and engine light with 2 codes, P0731 and P0733, both gear ratio codes related to the transmission. Thinking, being only 1k over the extended warranty and a regular dealership visitor for all the vehicles work, there would be no question about getting that covered, but was I wrong. No coverage, Hyundai Canada will not provide good will coverage and I will now be out 5K for a new transmission (for a car I paid 7k for 6 months ago).
So, the car still runs, and despite some slipping and slow shifting when the car is cold, it still drives fine. I am thinking, perhaps there are alternatives to a new transmission, maybe some other type of service that the dealership chooses not engage in, if replacement is their default solution. Cause, quite frankly, other than pulling the same codes I did and taking it for a test drive, they really didn't do any other diagnostics, replacement is just their standard solution in situations like this (their words, not mine).
Any thoughts from the community would be great, thanks.
 

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Do a complete flush and fill. It can't hurt, and may get you further down the road. That is a solenoid shifted transmission and fresh oil may clean up the 160K worth of sludge. Tranny's are not like engines; you don't have a filter, and the transmission fluid is "lifetime". The situation you have encountered is why I had my fluid changed at 60K. Not because there was a problem, but because a fluid change is a whole lot cheaper than a transmission replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great, that is exactly my plan, and exactly what I thought was happening. It is only exaggerated during cold conditions, once its warmed up, it's fine. Lead me to believe sludgy fluid and dirty passages. But when I tried to talk the dealership in to that, they gave me the spiel about what they usually do in these conditions. I'll see if they want to charge me for their 'diagnostics' time. I gave them the codes. Thanks.
 

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A transmission rest might also help. It can be done with a good scantool or by taking the negative battery terminal of for abt 5 minutes and pressing the brake pedal to remove any electrical energy. Not sure how successful the second method is.
 

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You want to do a drain and fill NOT a flush of transmission fluid. Look in YouTube for detail video on procedure. But you need to jack the car up on all four corners, so that the car is level. There is a drain plug at the bottom of transmission. There is a fill location on the top and a valve on the side that is used to see the level of the transmission fluid. You will drain like 5 liters. Replace the same amount of fluid that drains out. The transmission holds like 7 liters. A flush would be forcing fluid in and out and transmission are very delicate and have lots of nooks and crannies. You don’t want to clog anything up
 

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You want to do a drain and fill NOT a flush of transmission fluid. Look in YouTube for detail video on procedure. But you need to jack the car up on all four corners, so that the car is level. There is a drain plug at the bottom of transmission. There is a fill location on the top and a valve on the side that is used to see the level of the transmission fluid. You will drain like 5 liters. Replace the same amount of fluid that drains out. The transmission holds like 7 liters. A flush would be forcing fluid in and out and transmission are very delicate and have lots of nooks and crannies. You don’t want to clog anything up
If he were not having issues I would agree with you. Even my dealer does not push the "flush" on a normally performing tranny, just a drain and fill. But if you have issues with not shifting, or slipping, or other true performance issues the flush may clean out any ports that are obstructed and restore pressures to normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just an update. Ultimately, nothing the dealership can do for me, although I do feel they were in my court, but were subject to Hyundai Canada rules around a good will offer to extend the warranty by the extra 1000kms. Spoke to HC, and they also said there is nothing they can do. So, I asked the dealership to do the fluid change, and I took my car back. It still drives fine, although very apparent there is a problem, especially when cold. Once it warms up, it seems to work fine, but maybe not cycling through all the gears, seems to stop shifting up at 4th gear, as far as I know they have a 6 speed auto, and when switching to manual mode, the display is stuck on 4th no matter what, and does not shift manually. But normal city driving is fine once it warms up, haven't pushed it on the highway yet to see what happens.
Just some history, this car was purchased new with a factory extended warranty (6 year, 160k), and all regular service was done by Hyundai since new. I became the second owner in May 2019 with 140k on it, so approximately 20k left on the warranty. Upon reviewing history and maintenance requirements, it is very clear in the manual that the transaxle fluid does not need to be checked or changed, except for severe conditions, which this vehicle does not meet. Having been serviced by Hyundai it's entire life, if there was a need to change the fluid, wouldn't Hyundai have suggested that at some point?
When I dig in to any other pre-existing issues through TSB's and past maintenance, there is a TSB issued by HC regarding this particular issue, TSB #19-AT-012H which states that if these DTC codes appear, it is recommended to change the transaxle. This tells me it is a known issue. Also, when speaking to the dealership about any indications of this in the past, they noted the previous owner was recommended to change the fluid at 108k, and ultimately did it 3 months later. So, at approximately 115k, the fluid was changed. The dealership started talking about the previous owner not being diligent about maintenance as perhaps he should have had that fluid change done earlier. When I brought up the very clear, black and white issue in their maintenance schedule for the vehicle, which, again, recommends not even checking the fluid for the life of the car, he seemed a bit oblivious to that.
What does this all add up to? Defective prescribed maintenance practices in this vehicle, and likely many other models, which leads to premature transaxle failure, which HC is refusing to acknowledge.
Just my opinion, but considering the vehicle had been diligently maintained by the dealership since new, and given the failure(or impending failure) happened only 1k over the extended warranty, they should have at the very least, made an offer of co-pay or full replacement.
For all the Hyundai lovers out there, I am sorry to provide you my opinion on this, but as an avid Honda/Acura owner for most of my life, since my first purchase of a Hyundai, the engineering of these vehicles is far less superior in comparison. I have driven those brands for upwards of 400k, with nothing but regular maintenance, and for a major component like a transaxle to fail at only 161k, is strong indicator that I will never make a Hyundai purchase again.
 

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if your in Canada... the Severe service schedule should be followed. Some conditions will always be severe in Canada... just by temperature range and type of driving. Its covered in the owners manual.
as far as replacing the tranny, when it finally is decided it needs to be replaced, 2 options I would look at would be rebuilding (at a considerable cost I am sure but with a longer warranty) or buying a guaranteed used one from an auto recycler, maybe through a mechanic who would then also guarantee his labour to replace if it proved to be faulty within the warranty period.
There has to be plenty available at the auto recyclers in totalled GT or sedans. I bet they are all the same from 2011 to 2017 models of both the GT and the sedans. Same engine and trannys for sure on 2013 GTs and the 2011+ sedans. The engines changed in 2014 on the GT, but I don't think the transmission changed at all.
 

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For all the Hyundai lovers out there, I am sorry to provide you my opinion on this, but as an avid Honda/Acura owner for most of my life, since my first purchase of a Hyundai, the engineering of these vehicles is far less superior in comparison. I have driven those brands for upwards of 400k, with nothing but regular maintenance, and for a major component like a transaxle to fail at only 161k, is strong indicator that I will never make a Hyundai purchase again.
I was a Honda/ Acura owner only since 1992... with Accord and Acura TL models. Honda has had a long history of wonky transmissions. My 1999 Acura TL .. I sold because it had a chronic issue with the transmission, and it was a 1 off year so they were rare to find replacements... I sold it while failing at 275 K... and I was lucky to get that much compared to many other owners of the same car.
Honda Odyssey vans.... they had terrible transmissions for a number of years in the 2002 to 2005 years.
I had a 02 Ford Explorer... bought uit cheap and used, just out of the 60,000 kms warranty. Fixed the tranny slipping at 113k, replaced it at 117k, and sold it at 157k needing another complete replacement. Some people experienced as many as more than one replacements in the first 60K kms.

My 2013 GT is working fine at 128K kms... but i have an ear to any pending issues it might have. Overall, it's been a good vehicle for the 7 years I have owned it.... I have done nothing except change the oil and replace tires. original brakes are getting thin I bet. Need to spend some time & money on replacing fluids, including a tranny drain and fill. Don't like my Hyundai dealer though.... I avoid them unless its a recall or clear warranty issue.
 

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if your in Canada... the Severe service schedule should be followed. Some conditions will always be severe in Canada... just by temperature range and type of driving. Its covered in the owners manual.
as far as replacing the tranny, when it finally is decided it needs to be replaced, 2 options I would look at would be rebuilding (at a considerable cost I am sure but with a longer warranty) or buying a guaranteed used one from an auto recycler, maybe through a mechanic who would then also guarantee his labour to replace if it proved to be faulty within the warranty period.
There has to be plenty available at the auto recyclers in totalled GT or sedans. I bet they are all the same from 2011 to 2017 models of both the GT and the sedans. Same engine and trannys for sure on 2013 GTs and the 2011+ sedans. The engines changed in 2014 on the GT, but I don't think the transmission changed at all.
The gearing and final drive ratio is different between the 2013 1.8 GT and the 2014-2017 2.0 GT. I agree that a used transmission could be found relatively easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Update - I finally got my vehicle back from a local, reputable transmission repair shop. They had it for about two weeks, but repairs really only took a few days once they were able to source parts. I was thoroughly impressed with the shop, they walked me through everything, from removal to disassembly and diagnosis to reinstallation and finally, got to drive it home, better than ever. Here's what they had to say. They showed me how first gear had been slipping and burned out due to a factory defect when two bolts had loosened over time causing the gear to not seat properly, which eventually lead to its failure. The repair involved replacement of the gear and necessary seals etc, removal of the loose bolts, re-tightening and lock tight, and then replacement of the failed parts. Their assessment of this is it is common enough of a problem that a TSB had been issued, and factory parts were back ordered through Hyundai. Replacement was completed with sourced out after market parts.
Just a recap, Hyundai would not honour their factory warranty on a known issue as this failure happened less than 1000 km's beyond the warranty. I have since spent $2500 to have the repairs completed. The dealership quoted $5000 to replace the transmission, as far as I am concerned this is a deal for Hyundai to pay for the repair. I am continuing to pursue having Hyundai Canada pay for this known factory defect, and will not accept anything less than that. They are starting to get annoyed with my persistence. On hold again...…….great elevator music though.
 
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