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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At 13,000 miles the clutch self destructed and was replaced under warranty (not without a fight).

At 24,000 miles the transmission had to be replaced under warrenty (Metal in gear oil and broken teeth in 2.6)

Anyone else having similar problems in 2012 or 2013 Accent with the manual transmission?
 

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My manual transmission issue is not the same, but I thought I would mention it anyway.

Mine makes a little rattle when cold, but still performs well. The rattle happens when in neutral and the clutch isn't pressed. If I push up on the shifter slightly as if going to 1st or 3rd, then it quits making noise. This only happens when cold, or it has sat for days without use, and only for about the first 5-10 minutes. Replacing the stock oil with Redline helped, but didn't make the rattle go away. Dealer has confirmed that it's in the transmission, but doesn't want to tear it apart for a rattle, and I agreed. There is a 10 year / 100K mile warranty, so if something is truly "bad" inside it should show itself by then. No metal filings in the oil, so far.
 

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26000 KM and no problem. I asked the dealer about using Redline when I get the fluid changed later this year. He said that it would VOID my warranty if I used anything other than Hyundai fluid (even if I bring it in for them when they do the service)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The US has a law saying companies can only call out a specification not a brand.
not sure about anywhere else.
 

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At about 4k miles my 2013 Accent SE's 6sp transmission was making a really awful whining noise. My dealer gave me a brand new transmission, no questions asked. I'm at 10k now and so far it is fine.
 

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No problems anything like that -at 19,500 miles. I had big problems with notchy shifting early on. Not exactly at the very beginning. At the very beginning the shifter was smooth as ice - but I'd encounter a notch that kept me from entering third, and often at the worst possible times. Maybe my transmission wasn't filled to capacity at the factory. Who knows - I didn't think to check. The problem got worse over time. Redline MT85 at 10,000 miles cured it very satisfactorily! Maybe any gear oil of the right specs would have done the same, but I became a convert within about 3 minutes after driving away from my Redline drain and fill. Holy #%$& this is smooth!

It is thicker than the Hyundai gear oil I believe, at the same 75/85 SAE weight. But that may be a mistaken impression. I've only seen the Hyundai gear oil after it had experienced 10,000 miles of shearing. RL MT85 might be nicer if it were a little less viscous, (which is why I asked on another thread about possible mixes of the Redline manual gearbox oil with their D6 ATF which Redline claims "Also satisfies API 70W/75W/80W and GL-4 gear oil requirements") but then maybe if it were lighter it would lose some of the sweet properties that I like about it.
 

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No problems anything like that -at 19,500 miles. I had big problems with notchy shifting early on. Not exactly at the very beginning. At the very beginning the shifter was smooth as ice - but I'd encounter a notch that kept me from entering third, and often at the worst possible times. Maybe my transmission wasn't filled to capacity at the factory. Who knows - I didn't think to check. The problem got worse over time. Redline MT85 at 10,000 miles cured it very satisfactorily! Maybe any gear oil of the right specs would have done the same, but I became a convert within about 3 minutes after driving away from my Redline drain and fill. Holy #%$& this is smooth!

It is thicker than the Hyundai gear oil I believe, at the same 75/85 SAE weight. But that may be a mistaken impression. I've only seen the Hyundai gear oil after it had experienced 10,000 miles of shearing. RL MT85 might be nicer if it were a little less viscous, (which is why I asked on another thread about possible mixes of the Redline manual gearbox oil with their D6 ATF which Redline claims "Also satisfies API 70W/75W/80W and GL-4 gear oil requirements") but then maybe if it were lighter it would lose some of the sweet properties that I like about it.
How easy is it to drain and fill ?
 

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It's not too hard. Really simple if you have a car lift and a metering fluid pump. Most of us don't have access to those things though. If you're doing it in your own garage, there are two ways to do it: hard or easy. I did it the hard way. The way I did it simulates putting the car up on a lift, and this way measures the refill level the same way the service manual says to check for correct amount of fill. The correct amount of gear box oil is 2 qts (with an acceptable range of 1.9 qts to 2.01 qts). So two bottles of gear oil is exactly right. But you must make sure to get all of those 2 qt bottles in the transmission without spilling any. The procedure for checking whether the gear box is neither overfilled nor underfilled is to lift the car level both front to back and side to side, open the "Fill" port on the housing and stick your finger in. If the oil comes right up to the hole, there's enough gear oil. If the oil is pouring out of the hole, there's too much. (It's obvious why having the car truly level matters for this check). So I decided to put the oil in the same way. I would know that I had pumped enough oil in when there was oil up to the level of the fill hole, and none was coming out. I got three quart bottles of oil to make sure I'd have enough in case of spills and to allow for the retention of some oil in the transfer pump. My object was not just to empty two qt bottles, but to make sure to fill the gearbox up to the level of the fill hole, whatever volume of oil that took.

I had a more or less level concrete pad in a garage to do this safely (not at my house) and I had 2 pairs of stands to get all 4 corners off the ground simultaneously. I got a magnetic carpenter's level to check that the car was level once lifted. You can place this on a door sill to check for front to back level, and on the oil pan for side side level.

This way of draining and filling simulates having a car-lift and all work is done from the underside of the car, including the refill. If you do this you'll be all the way under the car for a long time so make to have fail safes for your stands - a substantial wheel or something placed underneath the car to keep it off you in case a stand cracks or the car slides off one way or another. As it happened, my car was level once up on four stands, according to my carpenter's level, but I discovered that it was not actually making contact on the driver's side front stand. It was just hovering over that one! There was like an 1/8" to 1/4" of air between car and stand. The car was balancing on the other three stands. I had been under the car on that side for some time when I noticed this. So I positioned the trolley jack on that corner and brought it up to just make contact with the pinch rail on that side for insurance. Check your stands carefully.

To drain: first of all check to make sure you can get the Fill plug lose before attempting to remove the Drain plug. THese nuts are screwed on very tight and getting sufficient leverage to wrench them off is difficult on your side with a car just inches above you. I drained the transmission first (Dur!) and then found the Fill plug so immovable that I just about gave up and called a tow truck. Don't do this. Losen the Fill plug first, and leave it in place.

Since in this method the car is level like it would be on a lift we can be sure all the gearbox oil will drain out, and very little will remain inside clinging to parts. You will need every drop of two quart bottles, and more if you spill. I spilled some naturally and was glad I had a third quart on hand. Also I expected that some would remain in the pump, and the last little bit of a bottle would be difficult to pump out. I was right on both counts. Having a third bottle hurts nothing.

After the transmission drains out, replace the drain plug, using a fresh crush washer. Both Fill and Drain have crush washers and guess what? they're not the same size as crush washers for the engine oil drain plug. Even better, they're not a common size you can find at an auto parts store. Triple bonus: your Hyundai dealer won't have these lying around in their parts dept. either. I had extra Dorman washers for oil changes and they were useless. I took the gearbox crush washers to autoparts stores and they couldn't match them. I went to the parts counter at the closest Hyundai dealer and they told me I could walk out with the parts I needed provided I was willing to wait 3 to 5 days for them to be shipped in from elsewhere. None of the other dealers nearby had them either, according to the computer. Order them well in advance of when you plan to change your gear box oil, or you will be forced to reuse the old washers, like I did, which is a very bad practice.

To refill from beneath the car requires some kind of fluid transfer pump. Any Walmart or auto parts store will have these for about 7 or 8 dollars. Some people refill using gravity to feed the oil in from above the engine compartment. In that case the hose must be snaked down past the engine etc, to reach the Fill hole on the transmission housing. I didn't do this. I refilled from below using a hand operated transfer pump. Some transfer pumps have a specially shaped screw on cap and siphon that fits the quart bottles you see in stores of transmission oil/ ATF bottles. Redline carefully designed their quart bottles not to work with this kind of pump. So you will need to hold the siphon in the RL bottle with one hand, work the transfer pump with your second hand, and hold the output hose of the pump securely in the gearbox Fill hole with your other second hand. Really, you don't want to cheat yourself out of an experience like this.

Transfer the first quart, and as the second quart begins to look empty, slow up your pumping. You don't want the stuff to splash out as it approaches the level of the fill hole. Maybe you'll find it easier to start on the third bottle than to struggle to get the last drops of the second into gearbox. That's what I did. Slowly finish bringing the level up until the oil begins to trickle out of the fill hole. Let it trickle some, making sure though that the level is really high as the hole, and not just splashing out from the force of your pumping. Stop pumping. Stick your finger in the fill port. If the oil is present at that port (and your car is level) your gearbox is refilled just right. Replace the Fill plug with a fresh crush washer.


Sizes and locations for the Fill and Drain plugs can be found in the service manual, uploaded by AZ2008, linked to in many threads here:
Dev-Host - The Ultimate Free File Hosting / File Sharing Service

Observe the torque values given in the service manual for retightening the Drain and Fill plugs. (Need torque wrench for this)

I guess the easy way involves pouring the gear box oil in from above, down a funnel/hose with the front wheels up on ramps or something. I didn't do that. If you go that way, make sure you have drained the trans out completely, with the car level all 4 wheels down, or there will be a fair amount of oil left in the gearbox and you can easily wind up overfilling the box if you put in two full qt bottles. others can give the full details for this method.
 

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Wow...very detailed description. I've swapped out the manual transmission fluid on two other cars w/ Redline and the difference is usually very noticeable if not night and day. I have yet to swap out the OEM fluid for Redline MT-85 but should hopefully be able to do that soon. You're stoking the interest again...

I think the one issue that I see with doing this change on the Accent is that the plug locations don't seem to be self-evident which can be a problem. There are a few ways to do this change...I usually utilize a clear 4 oz. squeeze bottle and fill it slowly from underneath the car. It takes a bit longer but in my opinion you have better control versus a pump or doing a gravity feed from the top of the engine. I have more patience when you eliminate the potential issues with leakage, overfill, dumping 10 bucks worth of fluid, or a total 30 buck disaster.
 

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Just changed mine it wasn't to bad to do but my shifter is still weird can't remember ifs it's normal or not it's hard to explain if I go to a gear you can feel it go through neutral like a bump and then it's fine
 

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I'm sorry to hear that changing the gear oil out didn't improve the problem. I should be more restrained in praising the Redline, but it really fixed some wicked notchiness for me. I wonder about the shifter mechanism itself sometimes, as it sees a lot of wear and tear. Is there something we can do to maintain them? At what point would it help to replace it, and what would that cost? I know there's a B&M sport shifter that some people have tried already, but I was thinking more like replacing stock with stock.
 

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I'm sorry to hear that changing the gear oil out didn't improve the problem. I should be more restrained in praising the Redline, but it really fixed some wicked notchiness for me. I wonder about the shifter mechanism itself sometimes, as it sees a lot of wear and tear. Is there something we can do to maintain them? At what point would it help to replace it, and what would that cost? I know there's a B&M sport shifter that some people have tried already, but I was thinking more like replacing stock with stock.
To be honest it does feel smoother so the redline is good. I just have a issue that affects my bushings probably and it's preventing me from getting perfect smooth shifts.
 

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The factory fill oil is not the 75/85 specced for refill ! Hyundai use a lighter grade oil then add stabiliser and load improver additives, that's the silvery grey speckles you can see in the old oil if you hold the drain pan up to a strong light. My i30 had a very stiff cluncky shift from the factory, at 15000 I changed it out for standard 75/85 mineral oil as specced in the operators book, shifts are much improved. I might consider synthetic next service.
 

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The factory fill oil is not the 75/85 specced for refill ! Hyundai use a lighter grade oil then add stabiliser and load improver additives, that's the silvery grey speckles you can see in the old oil if you hold the drain pan up to a strong light. My i30 had a very stiff cluncky shift from the factory, at 15000 I changed it out for standard 75/85 mineral oil as specced in the operators book, shifts are much improved. I might consider synthetic next service.
Good to hear. I was really hoping that grey silvery stuff wasn't shavings from my 3rd gear! Sometimes you know it just wouldn't... @$#&ing... go... in...

I noticed when I drained it that the original fluid seemed like it was composed of two different densities. Also, the 75/85 wt. Redline I put in seemed thicker. When my car was brand new the gear box would shift like a knife through water - except when it would hang up. Even when you shift you can feel extra viscosity with the Redline - like warm honey surrounding everything down there. And that led me to ask on another thread about maybe mixing it with with Redline ATF (SAE 75/80 )- but I sure as heck am not going to experiment with that myself.
 

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Yeah, I noticed the almost 'layered' densities when I drained my transmission, it's almost like the friction modifier/ load improver package Hyundai use are not quite soluble in the base oil. I never had problems with third, mine was an absolute cow to get into 2nd when cold, sometimes it felt like I was bending the shifter. Took it back to Hyundai and was told 'cannot replicate fault, therefore it doesn't exist', or similar words. Changing your oil one grade, specially in a multigrade oil will not have a dramatic effect, the oil you are suggesting will be ever so slightly thinner when hot. In Australia Ford used to make a manual transmission, coded T5 that depending on model application used 75W80, 20W50 engine oil, or ATF fluid as lubricant. I tried all the oils in mine, 75W80 felt like you were stirring mud with a stick, ATF fluid great shifts but you could hear the gears whining under hard throttle use when hot, settled on the 20W50 which was a reasonable halfway point.
 
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