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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in the mountains an back into my driveway that is on a steep hill. My car has rolled backwards twice now with the parking break engaged. The first time it came to a halt where it flattened out. Last night I had my truck parked behind it and it rolled into our recyling and garbage bins and pinned them between the car and the truck. I have a significant dent below the window on my hatch.

From my searching I see that Hyundai is recalling the Veloster for parking break issues. I am trying to find out if anyone else is having this problem with the Accent.

Manual transmission. Parking break engaged. Car was in neutral. I usually leave my car in first when parking on a hill. I am not sure if it slipped out of gear or I left it in neutral by accident.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Is there a way to edit your thread? I want to kick myself for spelling brake wrong. hahahaha

It let me edit this post. I have 58,000 miles on my car and the velosters recall is involving road dirt messing with the calipers so I am thinking this is a similar problem.
I always leave my car in gear when I park. I've been driving stick trannies since I was 15. It was found in neutral this time so I either screwed up or it popped out.
 

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The Veloster is a bit goofy, as (I think..) uses the Accent "chassis" and Elantra rolling bits (note that the Veloster has 5-lug hubs vs our 4 lug). I wouldn't be surprised if the rear brakes on the Veloster are closer to the Elantra vs. the Accent.

In any case, I've seen the light as far as rear brakes go- drums are perfectly fine, they last longer, and are harder to mess up with gravel/grit/dirt etc. My next cheap vehicle will probably have rear drums. I don't track cars.
 

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I have 27 000 km on my 2013. I complained twice to my dealer that the E brake will not hold unless pulled up to the max. He said that this was normal. I am not sure that i should have to pull it all the way up for it to hold
 

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I have 27 000 km on my 2013. I complained twice to my dealer that the E brake will not hold unless pulled up to the max. He said that this was normal. I am not sure that i should have to pull it all the way up for it to hold
I have almost 32,000 km on mine. I've always had to pull the hand brake all the way up for it to hold. I usually leave it in neutral unless I'm on a hill. Most of Southern Ontario is pretty flat.
 

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That's very alarming. I park nose down on a very steep hill every night. With a snow machine and a chair lift I could sell tickets to skiers & boarders. So far, with approximately 20K miles on my 2013 GS (has rear drums instead of discs) no hint of a problem with the parking brake. I leave it in reverse, wheels turned to the curb just in case. The owner's manual has something to say about how many clicks the parking brake should take to engage fully and at what force. Or maybe it's the service manual that describes the force needed. It's not normal for you (rietvelh) to have to pull the thing all the way up to the full range of its travel for the brake to be set - that dealer is talking some shinola the way dealers often do.

TGONAB: Any chance someone is pranking you? Transmissions should not pop out of gear into neutral by themselves. Although when you're stopping on a hill, getting the shifter into 1 or R FULLY can be a little harder than normal. Anyone who could get into my car could take it for a ride to the bottom of the hill at least by pushing in the clutch and releasing the parking brake. There is some best sequence to follow I'm sure. Like: holding in clutch and brake, set parking brake, move shifter into 1 or R, release brake pedal, turn front wheels to curb, switch off ignition, and finally release clutch. I think that's the order I use to avoid difficulty in shifting into a gear to park, but it's so involved I'm not completely sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nope, no pranking. My car was locked both times. I called Hyundai America and got a case number. My car is at the dealer now getting looked at.

The parking brake works. I can't pull out of my driveway when it's engaged. It sat in my driveway for at least an hour before I left in another vehicle and came home 4 hours later to find it down the hill.
 

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At least you are getting it looked at. Maybe if you can set a camera pointing at the car if the dealership "doesnt find anything wrong" to get evidence of it doing it.

Like many other users on the forum I too have to pull my handbrake pretty high to get it to hold. This is even after it has been "adjusted" at the dealership.
 

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NEVER-EVER leave a manual trans car parked in "N" and left with hand brake to hold vehicle in place.. hand brake not intended to hold weight of vehicle.

Place the manual trans in "1" or "R" when parking and wlaking away.. and set hand brake to add that little bit more resistance to roll..

In 25yr of driving a manual trans car, I never use handbrake on flat suface, let alone the trivial slope of my driveway.. I dont park think I have ever parked/left car unattended on an incline that I can recall
 

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Haven't parked my Accent on any huge hills yet. However, when I park any car on a particularly significant hill I always leave it in gear (frequently opposite of the direction of the car's orientation), turn the steering wheel to full lock one direction or the other (depending on the environment) which provides rolling resistance, and I chock one wheel with something handy like a rock.

When brake pads and rotors are warm, they expand a little. As they cool off, they contract. If a car is parked on a hill while the brakes are still quite warm, you run the risk of them cooling and then the car rolling as that happens. I see that all of the time at the top of The Snake on Mulholland Highway. People drive through the canyon and forget they heated up the brakes. Then they park and just engage the parking brake. Fifteen minutes later you hear everyone going, "oh no!" as a Mustang rolls back into a Camaro and it's not a pleasant situation.

Pointed up hill, I chock behind the right rear. Pointed down hill I chock the right front and then just use reverse to back off of the rock by one foot before driving off. This works even with the parking brake not engaged. I am *not* suggesting leaving a car parked on a hill without the parking brake engaged after normal driving, but after a particularly serious canyon drive using your brakes hard, you don't want to risk warping the rotors with the parking brake clamping the hot pads to the hot rotors in one spot for a long time which then impedes even cooling. For the situation the OP described, turning the wheel, leaving it in gear, and pulling the parking brake is minimum. A rock, piece of a 2x4, or proper wheel chock is something worth considering depending on the severity of the hill.

Or, if it is at all possible, consider orienting the car such that it is perpendicular to the hill. I realize that might not be an option in your driveway.
 

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Ok I'm still confused. Why would the parking brake be hot? Shouldn't it be at "ambient" temps. Unless you've out been practicing your j turns.
 

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Ok I'm still confused. Why would the parking brake be hot? Shouldn't it be at "ambient" temps. Unless you've out been practicing your j turns.
Unless you own a vehicle with a second set of rear brakes for use by the parking brake system only, then your parking brake uses the same pads and rotors as the rear brakes when you press down the brake pedal. There are some vehicles with small separate pads which still use the same rotor and some vehicles which actually have an entirely separate drum and brake just for parking brake system use.

In the case of vehicles which use either the same pads and rotors as the regular braking system or which use a separate set of pads but the same rotors, you will be pressing either hot pads against a hot rotor, or cool pads against a hot rotor. Either way, you are causing a "hot" spot on the rotor which will cool at a different rate than the rest of the rotor thus creating a potential for warping your rotor.
 

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Ok I'm still confused. Why would the parking brake be hot? Shouldn't it be at "ambient" temps. Unless you've out been practicing your j turns.
I think you are thinking there are separate main and parking brakes (there are on some aircraft and some (very) old cars.

There is not a separate parking brake on an Accent. The parking brake lever engages the pads (or shoes, not sure on an Accent) of the rear brakes. So, if you pulled in to the driveway quickly and engaged the brakes to avoid hitting the house (or rode the brakes a bit so your aren't driving up the driveway at 15 mph or more), the brakes are "hot" when you engage the parking brake and will release slightly as they cool.
 

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Interesting bit. I happened across this when I did a google search on "2013 Hyundai Accent parking brake".

 

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Interesting video! Expletives fail me.

And that Accent would be one with drums in the back, if I'm associating the wheel options with the brake options correctly. So it's not just Accents with rear discs doing this. I've always been pretty consistent about leaving my car in R (parked nose down on hill) with the wheels turned and parking brake on. Sometimes I don't turn the wheels very much - like maybe I shut the engine off before trying to turn them. But from now on, I know I'll have to be 100% consistent about this.

On edit: Oops that could be 2012 sedan with 14" steel wheels AND discs all around.
 

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I can't really comment on what brake type that model had and won't even try, but that is definitely a circumstance in which a wheel chock would have helped. They did have the wheel turned a little. I really half expected to see it roll down and squish the kids on the bicycles. Now that would have been truly awful!

Can't tell if this is a defect or not just from the video, but it sure is crazy to see it roll off like that.
 
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