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My heated driver and passenger seats just stopped working recently. Both went out at the same time. No lights from the 2 switches on the center console when they are pressed as well. I asked my mechanic to do a quick check and the fuse is still functional. What should I be looking into? Thank you in advance!
 

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What should I be looking into? Thank you in advance!
Your mechanic probably checked the obvious fuse. The one with the heated seat symbol on the diagram, but there will be more than one fuse in the circuit.
If it was me I would switch the ignition on, then take my voltmeter or test light and use that to check ALL the fuses. If you look closely at the fuses you will see that there are two little terminals on top of each fuse. If you probe those terminals with your voltmeter/test light you should find the same voltage on both terminals. If you find a fuse that has 12V on one terminal but nothing on the other that fuse is blown and should be replaced. It only takes a few minutes to probe all the fuses and it is often time well spent.


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I suppose, but who owns a stand alone continuity tester?
If your gonna use a multimeter I would suggest using the voltmeter. Not only does that tell you that the fuse is good but it also tells you that the fuse is being supplied with good voltage, so it's like two tests in one.

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You really got a point there! I still own a continuity tester with an alligator clamp attached to the wire end Of it and a little light bulb inside the contraption with the pointed needle. Man, I am old!
 

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I still own a continuity tester with an alligator clamp attached to the wire end Of it and a little light bulb inside the contraption with the pointed needle.
I guess the modern name for that is test light. Yeah, you can certainly use that. In fact I prefer using my test light to the voltmeter for testing fuses.
When you said continuity tester I thought you where talking about a beeper thing that you would connect to the two fuse test points, like the continuity test you would do with a multimeter.

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I guess the modern name for that is test light. Yeah, you can certainly use that. In fact I prefer using my test light to the voltmeter for testing fuses.
When you said continuity tester I thought you where talking about a beeper thing that you would connect to the two fuse test points, like the continuity test you would do with a multimeter.

You are right! Test light!!


If I helped you fix it, why not...

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Your mechanic probably checked the obvious fuse. The one with the heated seat symbol on the diagram, but there will be more than one fuse in the circuit.
If it was me I would switch the ignition on, then take my voltmeter or test light and use that to check ALL the fuses. If you look closely at the fuses you will see that there are two little terminals on top of each fuse. If you probe those terminals with your voltmeter/test light you should find the same voltage on both terminals. If you find a fuse that has 12V on one terminal but nothing on the other that fuse is blown and should be replaced. It only takes a few minutes to probe all the fuses and it is often time well spent.


If I helped you fix it, why not...

Your support is greatly appreciated
Hi AUTOSPARK,

My Sonata has the same issue. May I ask why do you suggest testing all fuses instead of just the Front Seats Warmer Module one? Thanks!
 

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May I ask why do you suggest testing all fuses instead of just the Front Seats Warmer Module one? Thanks!
Because 25+ years experience tells me that the fuse that has blown and is causing a fault often isn't the obvious one that would seem to make sense.
Plus it only takes 5 minutes. And it's often 5 minutes well spent.

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Because 25+ years experience tells me that the fuse that has blown and is causing a fault often isn't the obvious one that would seem to make sense.
Plus it only takes 5 minutes. And it's often 5 minutes well spent.

If I helped you fix it, why not...

Your support is greatly appreciated
Do you mean the fuses are somewhat connected with each other? Also if there's nothing wrong with the fuse, what other things should I look at? I read that the fault could be due to the switch or the heater module underneath the seat, and it's costly to fix those areas. Is this correct?
 

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Do you mean the fuses are somewhat connected with each other?
Different fuses supply power to different parts of the circuit. The fuse with the heated seat symbol might supply power to the heating element, but there could be another fuse that supplies power to the switch, for example. So you really need to check all the fuses.

That is especially on a modern car with a BCM. What are the MODULE fuses on your car actually for?
No, I've no idea either. So when I am asked to diagnose a fault the first step in the process is to check ALL the fuses. That way it doesn't matter what each fuse is for.

CrispyBacon said:
Also if there's nothing wrong with the fuse, what other things should I look at?
You should check that the voltage from the fuses is reaching the component it's supposed to power. You should check that all the grounds are where they're supposed to be. That the switches are supplying power or sending their signals to where they're supposed to be going.

CrispyBacon said:
I read that the fault could be due to the switch or the heater module underneath the seat, and it's costly to fix those areas. Is this correct?
It could be costly, or not. It really depends what the fault turns out to be. Fixing a broken wire is cheap. Replacing a faulty module probably wont be.

If I helped you fix it, why not...

Your support is greatly appreciated
 

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Different fuses supply power to different parts of the circuit. The fuse with the heated seat symbol might supply power to the heating element, but there could be another fuse that supplies power to the switch, for example. So you really need to check all the fuses.

That is especially on a modern car with a BCM. What are the MODULE fuses on your car actually for?
No, I've no idea either. So when I am asked to diagnose a fault the first step in the process is to check ALL the fuses. That way it doesn't matter what each fuse is for.


You should check that the voltage from the fuses is reaching the component it's supposed to power. You should check that all the grounds are where they're supposed to be. That the switches are supplying power or sending their signals to where they're supposed to be going.


It could be costly, or not. It really depends what the fault turns out to be. Fixing a broken wire is cheap. Replacing a faulty module probably wont be.

If I helped you fix it, why not...

Your support is greatly appreciated
Thank you for explaining. I'm no mechanically inclined so these information is very helpful. I'll check the fuses first to see how it goes.
 
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