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Tools Required

Ratchet
8 inch extension
10mm socket
12mm socket
Electric Meter (optional)
Electrical Tape (optional)
Drill
1" drillbit (speedbor or spade probably best)
Vice
Shop Towel
Work Light

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Install Time +/- 90 Minutes
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This is a $100 eBay CANBUS HID Kit

Most all these kits are just a bulb and ballast combination. Nothing complicated, it's just like changing the headlight bulbs, except you're going to put a new power source between the car's 12V and the bulb.

Step 1 - Get the battery out of the way

Assuming you've got all your tools together and are in a nice, well lit, garage environment and not battling the elements, set the parking brake, pop the hood, and get to it.

Use the ratchet and 10mm socket to disconnect the negative battery terminal, and set the terminal aside.

Use the ratchet and 10mm socket to disconnect the positive battery terminal, and pull it loose from the battery.

Use the ratchet, 8 inch extension, and 12mm socket to loosen and remove the battery retention bracket from the front of the battery.

CAREFULLY remove the battery and set on a surface other than the ground (or on top of something on the ground. Don't set this on your engine cover or anything stupid....

Now that you've got the battery out of the way, you have room to work on the drivers side headlight.



Step 2 - Installing the bulb and ballast

The Sonata headlights have a screw on cap with a soft poly washer that keeps the water out of the lenses. You DO NOT want water in the headlights or any part of the electrical system, so taking a little extra care here is a big deal.

Pop the cap (it's the one at the far right) off the rear of the projector headlight. You'll notice inside the cap a letter G. Using a shop towel as a buffer to keep from marring or cracking the cap, put the cap into your vice so that the inside is facing upward and tighten until snug enough to drill (DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN - YOU'LL BREAK IT).

Using the drill, line up the center of your bit on that letter G on the inside of the cap, and bore a 1" hole out. (This particular kit, 1" was the sweet spot. Measure FIRST, and TWICE!)




Back to the car: pull the power connector off the back of the light bulb and push aside.

The bulb is held in by a simple spring (looks like a paperclip), If you push in a bit, and move to the side, the retaining spring releases and swings downward and out of the way. You can then remove the bulb (avoid touching the glass). Note the little toothed notch in the steel area of the bulb. This faces straight down, 6 o clock. Only goes in one way.

Time to install the new bulb. Take out of the casing carefully, again, not touching any glass. Thread all your wires through the headlight cap you just drilled out (thread them from the inside of the cap to the out) and pull the rubber grommet into place, filling the hole you've drilled with a nice water (resistant) seal.



Notice the tooth on the edge of the bulb in the picture below. Insert the bulb carefully, with this tooth facing down, and you'll find there's a slot in the headlight socket where it lines up. Once lined up and pushed in flush (you'll know when it's in there) - lock it in place by pressing the spring back in, and shifting it slightly sideways to latch.



I recommend using a meter to make sure you have the positive and negative properly identified. Obviously, you need to do this BEFORE disconnecting the battery. Hook to the headlight connector, push the start button of the car twice to enable the headlights and then mark your positive and negative. The positive terminal is shown below with the red lead sticking out of it.



The power leads and the connector stay inside the actual headlight casing on the Sonata. Connect up the leads, and then wrap in electrical tape to ensure they stay in place. The last thing you need is your headlights melting down on you in the middle of a late night ride home from the pub...





With all of this done, you can now re-install your cap. You'll need to gently tuck the connector off to the side inside the headlight housing, and then screw the cap back on. Be careful not to lose the poly ring around the cap, as this is the water seal.



Now all there is left to do is mount the ballast and plug everything up. The two way tape that comes with the kit is the way to go in my opinion. There's a nice bit of flat-ish real-estate as shown below where the ballast fits nicely. Bear in mind, your wires need to be able to reach, be secure and out of the way of any moving or flexing parts, and out of the path of any water that would normally spray up into the engine in bad weather. Pick a spot, verify your connections will reach (and you have enough clearance to plug them in or unplug them) and stick it to it.



The procedure is exactly the same for the passenger side, and there's also a nice place to stick, right in front of the coolant reservoir.




Step 3 - Put it all back together

Check all your connections. Make sure everything is snug, and out of the path of moving parts. Make sure to tape up anything that might shift or rattle, or be exposed to more water than it should.

Pop the battery back in place, secure the bracket with the 12mm socket and extension, and reinstall the terminals (positive first) with the 10mm socket.

With the hood still open, push your start button twice to enable the headlights and fire em up. It's normal for ballasts to have a bit of a buzz to them when you click them on. These are considerably louder than the factory ballasts on any of my Acuras or my S2000, but it's normal - no panic.

Start the car. Verify you aren't getting any check engine or warning lights with the headlights turned on, and that all your switches are doing what they should. Turning the HID lights off and on repeatedly is bad for the bulbs and ballasts - so avoid doing so.

You're good to go!


This is an 8K HID from this kit on the drivers side vs the factory Philips halogen bulb on the passenger side.



This is the HID vs the Halogen on field of view.



The car with both HIDs installed




Honestly, I'll need to drive it at night to see if it's an improvement, but it might not be. The field of view seems much more narrow, and I don't know if the lights are as bright (though more illuminating for sure). They do have the 12'o'clock shadow, and maybe better bulbs would avoid this piece.
 

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Didn't see it posted anywhere but what bulb size did you get? I'm getting my limited turbo tomorrow and this would be my first upgrade that I want to do.
 

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Does the radio need a security code to activate after a battery disconnect? I ask as my VW has this feature. Also on a previous car I had the auto up down (for the power windows) & power seats needed to be re activated after a battery disconnect. Great tutorial, I'm certainly going to do this mod........
 

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QUOTE (pseudomaniac @ Nov 27 2010, 09:50 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=375063
Honestly, I'll need to drive it at night to see if it's an improvement, but it might not be. The field of view seems much more narrow, and I don't know if the lights are as bright (though more illuminating for sure). They do have the 12'o'clock shadow, and maybe better bulbs would avoid this piece.
With a 8000k HID kit, your lumen output isn't that much higher than the regular halogen bulbs. So, the lower lumen output coupled with the higher Kelvin rating is likely the reason you're not seeing much of a difference in overall light output. OE HID headlights are in the 4200-4300K range and put out a lot more lumens than a typical halogen bulb. The shadow you're talking about (I think you meant a 6 o'clock shadow?) is created by the ceramic insulator that covers the one exposed electrode going to the tip of the HID capsule (the other electrode is built into the HID capsule base).
 

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QUOTE (NBCGLX @ Dec 29 2010, 01:19 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=384425
With a 8000k HID kit, your lumen output isn't that much higher than the regular halogen bulbs. So, the lower lumen output coupled with the higher Kelvin rating is likely the reason you're not seeing much of a difference in overall light output. OE HID headlights are in the 4200-4300K range and put out a lot more lumens than a typical halogen bulb. The shadow you're talking about (I think you meant a 6 o'clock shadow?) is created by the ceramic insulator that covers the one exposed electrode going to the tip of the HID capsule (the other electrode is built into the HID capsule base).
Apparently if you are able to file down the one notch of the HID base of the bulb, you can flip it to avoid the shadow tracks shown in this picture. I will be doing my HID's next week, just waiting for my relay kit to arrive to play things safe first.
 
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