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We have a 2011 Azera that has 23,000 mi. Just returned from a 4K trip to Nova Scotia and the tire 'noise' was terrible.

I had the Michelin tires inspected at the neighborhood Michelin dealer and they said the tire wear was even but we have 'chopping' on the inside of our tires.

We have not been rotating our tires (never did on the 2 Mercedes, 1982 300k mi and 1992 225k mi owned previously only moved the fronts to the back when the excessive wear was evident) and we have not had an alignment done - never hit any big pot holes or curbs.

Is tire 'chopping' common on an Azera and are we responsible for not having the tires rotated or an alignment done?

I am disappointed in the tire wear but am willing to 'man up' if lack of rotation is the cause.

More and more I think I should have bought a rear wheel drive automobile.

What do all you Azera/Hyundai owners think? I did have an 06 Sonata that I replaced the original equipment tires with Yokhama tires and never encountered this problem although we did rotate the tires as it was included in the purchase price.

My/our bad??
 

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Lack of rotation is a start, gross camber and toe numbers called out by Hyundai dont help matters..

Find an alignment guy that will read the numbers and minimize (straighten and square the numbers) everything adjustable to maximize tire wear.
 

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I had 53,000 miles of my Azera when I sold her a few months back. Had the stock Michelin tires and the ride couldn't have been better. Didn't have any issues with the tires.

I did rotate then twice a year, alignment twice a year as need, proper pressure, all makes for better tire ware. I took my car to the dealer one more time in April and he said the tires had another 8 to 10 thousand miles on them for sure as the tread looked good. My Azera was 6 years old. Not many miles on a six year old Azera yet I don't drive much as my work is only two miles away from home.
 

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they said the tire wear was even but we have 'chopping' on the inside of our tires.

Is tire 'chopping' common on an Azera and are we responsible for not having the tires rotated or an alignment done?
I think the term probably is "cupping" and yes, it is common on ALL cars where the proper tire maintenance is not done.
Low tire pressure makes it even worse.
How often do you check the pressures ??

I think this is a "man up" situation for sure.
 

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Not sure if there are any newer threads, but I am looking for help with similar problem on my '11 Azera. I started with the OEM Michelins and had to change them at 37k miles after I couldn't take the noise any longer. These tires started with the chop pattern (technical term for it is heel-toe wear) on the inside tread blocks. By about 20k miles the inside edges were showing a scallop or cupping pattern (high/low tread blocks alternating approximately every 1-2 blocks). This is what creates the worst noise. Was only rotating every 10k. Based on info on this site, it sounded like it might be alignment or maybe just the Michelin tires.

I spend $$$ on Continental DWS tires (great tire in rain or snow!) and also had alignment done at reputable shop - also had them reduce rear camber from a little over -1.0 to around -0.5 deg. Tires were fine for several rotations (have been rotating every 4-5k). Could still see some heel-toe pattern just starting on inside tread blocks, but X-rotating every 4-5k allowed me to cancel it out before the chop set in too much. The problem is that by about 15k I was again just starting to see the cupping form on the inside tread blocks. Had another alignment done at 18k on tires (about 55k on car) and nothing major, but did adjust toe and camber more back to neutral. I am now at 25k on tires and the cupping is very it is very visible and the tire noise is getting bad again. Based on my observations at the rotation I believe the cupping is coming from the rear positions, but unfortunately with the frequency of rotation I have ruined all 4 tires again.

Given that it is all 4 tires, it isn't simply a balance issue. Based on two high end sets of tires and 2 full alignments I don't believe it is related to the brand of tire or the basic alignment being off. The shocks don't appear to be bad (no bounce) and there is no clunking indicating a loose/worn part in the suspension.

Is this just a design issue on the Azera (and other Hyundai cars from what I have seen posted) or is there a fixable problem that I can address before spending money on another set of tires. PS - I drive nearly all highway miles which allowed me to get 85-90k on my Michelins on my last two cars (Buicks) with absolutely no detectable wear patterns or tire noise.
 

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Try General Altimax Hp tires

Have 07 Azera and this is the best tire for the car. My michelins made so much noise by 25 , I had to get rid of them. LAst set of Altima lasted 35k and no noise. I probably could have run them longer if it were not the start of winter. Little did i know there would be no rain in California in dec and Jan. I rotate all tires but have not done alignments between tire changes. This time I will.
 

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tire wear/ tell it how it is

These comments about tire rotation are full of it. I think this is put out by Hyundai salesmen...I have had two azeras that were plagued with early tire wear and roadnose. For the life of me I dont understand why Hyundai wont fix this. Probably because this vehicle is not a front runner in sales so they get away with not investing into it the way they would a top seller such as Sonata.
 

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I got a very good digital level for camber and a string set up to measure toe (if careful, I can repeatably measure both camber and toe to within less than 0.1 deg). I then did various different checks of camber/toe to see what conditions might be influencing my tire wear problems. To duplicate my weight I put 210 lb. on drivers seat - almost no change to camber on LR, but added about 0.5 deg negative camber to RR (very little change in front wheels). To simulate rolling load/resistance, I preloaded the wheels by putting car in drive, depress the brake and set the emergency brake and put the transmission back in park. This keeps tension on the rear wheels to somewhat duplicate drag/resistance at highway speeds This adds about 0.4 negative camber to both rear wheels. I also checked putting 100 lb. in trunk - this adds about 0.3 deg of negative camber to both rear wheels. Due to my work I drive most of the time by myself with some luggage, etc. in the trunk. My prior shop alignments showed my rear wheels to be in the range of neg 0.6-0.7 degrees, but under driving conditions these wheels are probably well over 1 degree neg camber and even more so on the RR where I have seen more of my wear pattern coming from. I have now set my car up (unloaded/no weight) with 0.4 deg pos camber on RR and 0 deg on the LF. I estimate that this should keep me in the range of negative 0.3-0.5 deg under my normal driving conditions. I also set my toe to zero on both rear wheels since none of my tested conditions had any measurable effect on rear-end toe. Shop manuals indicate setting rear toe at +0.1 deg (toe-in) to compensate for the rearward force of rolling resistance, but I couldn't see any effect. At this point I left the front end as is since I don't believe my issues were coming from the fronts anyway.
 
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