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Torque steer is usually felt only under high load, while accelerating from a dead stop at full throttle.

If it was not doing this before changing the tires, you either have a defective tire, loose lug nuts, or
something in the suspension was left loose or damaged.

I have never needed a wheel alignment after a new set of tires.
 

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QUOTE (mamamia @ May 30 2010, 09:03 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=327822
I'm just wondering, wouldn't you expect the car manufacturere to take it all into consideration when engineering the car and then writing the alignment specs? In my logic, if the alignment is done to those exact numbers --- the car should have no pull whatsoever, no?


It's possible to compensate for torque steer at 1 speed, and 1 throttle loading, but not all speeds and all loadings.
If you set the alignment to completely eliminate it for say 0-15mph under hard acceleration, your car would
probably pull hard to the left cruising at 60mph. It's 1 of the many compromises in cars. On the whole, I think car
makers do a great job negating torque steer.

On 2 different occasions, I have bought new tires that made the car pull to one side. Once, it was a slipped belt,
once it was a big bubble on the sidewall (don't know if the belt was also slipped). Exchanging the faulty tires
straightened it right out.

New tires should not require you to align the wheels on a car in good condition. That's just a sales gimmick.
 
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