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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I am interested in compiling a list of specific tools (types, sizes (SAE/Metric)) required for performing a complete spark plug replacement on a 2008 Santa Fe Limited (or similar with 3.3L V6 Lambda I). Spark plug types are omitted from this quest due to their ubiquitous availability.

Can anybody provide some insight? Thank you! :)
 

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5/8" spark plug socket (rubber inside): Many socket ratchet sets include
6" extension
10mm socket


Hyundai OEM spark plug must be
-NGK 7854 IFR5G11 PlatinumGroundElectrode NGK 7854 IFR5G11 Iridium Spark Plug

and these are compatible lists,

-Denso 5303 Iridium IK16 0.4mm (short life, rated 30k miles=50k km)
-Denso 3395 SK16PRL11 longlife
-NGK 5464 BKR5EIX-11 0.6mm MPG imprv NGK 5464 BKR5EIX-11 Iridium Spark Plug
NGK Iridium Ix Spark Plug (BKR5EIX-11)-5464 - Advance Auto Parts
NGK BKR5EIX 11 Iridium IX Spark Plugs SET OF 6 FOR Merecedes Benz | eBay x6 C$53

I drove '07 SF only 60k miles, so I'll wait until 90k miles,
then NGK 5464 BKR5EIX-11 will be my choice.
 

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If you plan to replace ALL spark plugs (6) - you may need to have the intake manifold off.
 

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For there rear plugs, there's no "may" about it. The upper intake comes off.
Tools that have been recommended in the past:

M6, M8, M10 & M12 (and possibly M14) sockets
Ratchet wrench with long and short extensions
spark plug socket
pliers
Philips screwdriver
flat screwdriver
adjustable wrench
New gaskets (from Hyundai)

Per Hyundai, here are your tightening torques for reassembly of the intake manifold and new gasket, and it's done in 3 steps and in a particular sequence to keep from warping things:

Tightening torque
1st : 3.9 ~ 5.9Nm (0.4 ~ 0.6kgf.m, 2.9 ~ 4.3lb-ft)
2st : 18.62 ~ 23.52Nm (1.9 ~ 2.4kgf.m, 13.74 ~ 17.36lb-ft)
3st : Repeat 2nd step twice or more.

When you do the first step, tighten in sequence a to h (see photo).
When you start the 2nd, tighter step, tighten in sequence 1 to 8.
 

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Nothing more than a few simple hand tool.. though I have air ratchet, so I cheat.

10, 12, 14 mm short sockets, maybe an extension or 2, a plug socket, long needle nose for couple clamp..

Nothing complicated about the job.

Plugs, and appropriate gaskets for intake plenum and throttle body..
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for all of your help! I will be posting a new version, specific to the Hyundai Lambda 3.3L V6, with photos in the coming month.

I realize that without checking to verify that my spark plugs are worn, and with my car only having 45,000 miles, this procedure would most likely be considered unnecessary/wasteful. However, for the purposes of learning more about working on my Hyundai which I purchased at 30,000 miles, I want to be ahead of the game.

Thank you all for your assistance and, hopefully, I will produce a high-quality DIY Spark Plug Replacement guide for the Lambda 3.3L V6!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Can anybody confirm the following? I have determined these are the part numbers for the two gaskets (plenum & throttle body) that need to be replaced during this job:

Again for the Santa Fe 3.3L:
Plenum: 29215-3C301
Throttle Body: 35101-3C200

I grabbed this information from HyundaiPartsSource.com and other sites.

The Throttle Body gasket is labeled "35101" in the diagram. The Plenum is labeled "29215." I have circled these in red to make them easier to see.
 

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Depends if your engine uses the plastic plenum, or the aluminum plenum, LAMBDA use both in the mix
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
sbr711: It sounds like I will be able to determine this by feeling the plenum when the engine is cold, either via texture or tapping lightly on it with a metal object?
 

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If someone experienced can post Diy with pics on this, will be very helpful to other members..
Here are those;; The same engine, similar intake (look like plastic plenum), my 07 SF has aluminum.
2006 Sonata (NF) V6 3.3L Lambda engine @99k miles

Forum::
FLUID's blog: Sonata 2006 v6–Changing Spark Plugs

Pictures::
http://www.hyundai-forums.com/181-n...nata-v6-spark-plug-pcv-valve-replacement.html

Video::

hpspec said:
to determine this by feeling the plenum
plastic or aluminum by color (see my SF aluminum, picture when I replace the valve cover gasket)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
plastic or aluminum by color (see my SF aluminum, picture when I replace the valve cover gasket)
I see the difference...so how does this affect the plenum gasket? Does it require a different part number, or does one require a gasket and the other does not? I have only found the one part number thus far, but perhaps I am not searching hard enough.
 

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Aluminum intake uses a flat shim gasket with somewhat square ports I think it is and a flat gasket at throttle body I think.... the black plastic plenum uses (3) grey silicone gasket for the plenum to lower intake, and a single grey silicone ring for the throttle body to plenum..
 

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Just changed the plugs on a 2008 sonata and thanks to this site and the step by step directions it was a breeze. Reused the old gaskets also. thanks again

Gary
 

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How I replaced my 2008 Santa Fe 2.7L spark plugs.

I noticed at approx. 90K miles the average fuel mileage had dropped from 22-23mpg to 20mpg my driving is primarily all highway. I drive 500 miles per week. So at 98K I decided to tackle changing the spark plugs myself.
After replacing the spark plugs acceleration was instant w/no hesitation and after a couple of fill ups the mpgs were back at 22-23mpg.

Below is how I accomplished changing the plugs.

I spent a Saturday morning 1-2 hours getting the surge tank out of the way to reach the back three plugs.
Sunday morning I installed the new plugs and reinstalled everything in1-hour
Now that I have accomplished this service I can do it in half the time.

1st remove negative battery terminal

unclip air cleaner cover , remove the air cleaner assembly remove the hose clamp at the air intake unit. See Pics showing the electrical connectors (blue circle) and hoses (yellow circles) to remove. No need to remove the air intake unit it can stay attached to the surge tank.

remove the black plastic top cover 4 - bolts. See attached Pic.

Look at the attached picture 08 santa fe spark plug service.jpg to see the bolts (red circles), hoses (yellow circles) and electrical connectors (blue circles) that need to be removed.

There is one bolt to the right side just below the air intake and it's right between the two water lines connecting to the surge tank that has to be removed also two bolts at the back of the surge tank that you have to reach from behind and remove by touch and feel.

No need to remove the water line clamps, now the surge tank can be lifted above the two front threaded studs and turned counter-clockwise just enough to clear the rear head to access the rear three spark plugs easily.

I also attached a picture showing the NGK plugs I used and the Hyundai surge tank gasket for the 2008 2.7L Santa Fe engine.

Enjoy
 

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Quick question, is the head on the 3.5L aluminum?

Also, glad to see nobody is using anti-seize. If you read the NGK documentation closely, the plug threads have what they call a Trivalent coating and do not require additional anti-seize compound. In fact I believe NGK tell you specifically not to apply anti-seize compound to avoid over-torquing.

I am curious because I come from the BMW world. On the E46s they spec NGK plugs with the Trivalent thread coating. You would not believe the heated debates over using vs not using anti-seize when doing plugs.
 

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At 65k miles of 2007 3.3L, in the middle of changing engine oil,
I checked one spark plug at the front center, NGK IFR5G11.

Its threads are all wet, probably with engine oil.
The plug body hole wall looks clean.

I took pictures, please give me your opinions.
Do I need to replace plugs?
Do I have engine oil problem?
 

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Can't say I like the looks of the crud building up around the center electrode, especially what I see in photo #6. Is that representative of how all 6 look? If that's hardened material that can't be cleaned off easily, you should save a few $ worth of your good humor and just replace instead of trying to clean them up.

As for all of the oil around the threads, have you dealt with the valve cover gaskets on this engine yet? I can't recall what, if anything, you've posted about that.
 

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Can't say I like the looks of the crud building up around the center electrode, especially what I see in photo #6.
Is that representative of how all 6 look? If that's hardened material that can't be cleaned off easily,
you should save a few $ worth of your good humor and just replace instead of trying to clean them up.

As for all of the oil around the threads, have you dealt with the valve cover gaskets on this engine yet?
I can't recall what, if anything, you've posted about that.
Yes, picture shows right. it's covered half side of the plug.
I tried to remove it on the center and ground electrode,
that was very hard to remove even with a cutter knife.

I replaced the valve cover gasket on the early 2012.
 
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