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My '05 has been failing recently and now that its below zero out, the heating has died on me. I started the car up, cranked up the heat/defrost and went back in side so the car could warm up, got back outside and the fan was off. Doesn't matter what speed or setting. My wife had said the fan was making noise last week.

So how do I troubleshoot this to determine what could be the problem? I've read about it being the switch or the blower motor, or even the fuse, but i'm not sure which one to start with. Also, I can't find any diagrams about where the blower motor is on the car or how to get to it. Any help would be appreciated since this car is strictly a DIY fix now. Thanks!

Jake
 

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My '05 has been failing recently and now that its below zero out, the heating has died on me. I started the car up, cranked up the heat/defrost and went back in side so the car could warm up, got back outside and the fan was off. Doesn't matter what speed or setting. My wife had said the fan was making noise last week.

So how do I troubleshoot this to determine what could be the problem? I've read about it being the switch or the blower motor, or even the fuse, but i'm not sure which one to start with. Also, I can't find any diagrams about where the blower motor is on the car or how to get to it. Any help would be appreciated since this car is strictly a DIY fix now. Thanks!

Jake
Push hard in the middle of the fan switch(or give it a hard whack) and see if the fan doesn't start back up. If it does, you have a bad fan switch.
 

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Hitting it did nothing. Still not working and still freezing outside.
well, I can tell you where the blower is as I just removed mine last week(I had a leaf caught in the blades). It is in the passenger side tucked up tight to the bulkhead. It has three screws holding it in and the third one towards the bulkhead is a bitch kitty. I ended up using a straight slot screwdriver on the phillips head because you can't get a straight shot at it. Maybe 60 degrees at best. When(and or if) you manage to get all three screws out, you can pull it down around 2 inches(you need to pull it 5) when it will hit the bulk head. I pealed back the carpet and ultimately cut out about a 5 square inch patch of plastic backing in order to get the fan out. If I remember right SBR711 used a good sized ballpean hammer to get clearance from the bulkhead to get the fan out.
 

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The fan switch has a propensity to fail under extremes (hot or cold) so I'd put my money on that before anything else as it much cheaper to replace than the blower motor.
 

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The fan switch has a propensity to fail under extremes (hot or cold) so I'd put my money on that before anything else as it much cheaper to replace than the blower motor.
Shouldn't take all that long to take a multimeter to the fan connector and it is not that hard to pull out.
 

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Great posts. I can tell you my little story on my 2004 Santa Fe V6. All the above is correct. If you aren't getting any blowing air, start this way as it's 99% it's one of these four things. Do it exactly this way to save time and money. Don't be me.

Start the vehicle. Make sure you hear your engine running. No radio on, no ac/heater fan on.

Turn your blower fan to any position. Do you hear the engine drawing power to the fan? Yes? Then it's not a fuse, (the first thing to check, but most unlikely suspect). No? Then check the fuse box in the engine compartment, (not under the dashboard).

Second, the blower switch. That's the middle knob you are turning on the dash from high to low. If turning the knob produces no air it's $25, simple to remove and replace. Yes, mine died in 30 below zero temperatures this year but I did everything backwards from this post. (Expensive and stupid).

Third, the resistor. You have to take the glove box apart, (easy), to get at it, but it's simple to replace. $40 solution

Last, (and good luck as mentioned before), the blower motor. Three screws. If you actually can get the farthest one out, congrats! Then the motor will drop two inches and you will still need clearance for three more which will be impossible as the back of the motor will get stuck on the curved floor panel. I never got mine out! I just plugged the new one in dangling, ($100), and found out it didn't run either so I THEN knew it wasn't the motor.

Hope this helps...If anyone needs a new resistor or blower motor, let me know...
 

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Seen many previous threads about failing fan, it turned out to be the switch in 99 of a 100 cases. However, resistor could have failed at the lower settings. At highest setting the resistor is not involved anymore and the ground lead is directly switched to the motor. So if it is still not running at highest setting your switch (or a loose ground wire to it) will be the problem. Seems it fails a lot, probably it is a bit weakly engineered or choosen to small for its task.
The resistor probably only would fail on the second highest setting, with most current flowing through it, so most power dissipated in that little resistor section.

So, I would first check the fuse, if it is ok I would pull the switch out and simply interconnect the outgoing wires one after the other to a ground. The fan motor should respond by turning slow or faster. Only one wire can not respond to the fan, the ground wire to the switch itself. If it is still not turning the fan you might suspect the motor itself or wiring going towards it.

Good luck,
Paul
 
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